Net Neutrality Rules Overturned By FCC

Discussion in 'Android News' started by DroidModderX, Dec 14, 2017.

  1. LoneWolfArcher

    LoneWolfArcher Silver Member

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    Yeah this is bound to happen either way though. And more and more taxes too. Kind of like our cell phone bill. Just checked my monthly cellphone bill, $13 in fees and taxes. (You all might not be surprised to learn that I am pretty anti-tax.)
     
  2. Narsil

    Narsil Silver Member

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    I think wired providers are going to be going the way of the dinosaurs here in the very near future.

    I read a tech article several years ago about a wireless technology that could replace cell towers as we currently know them. The individual wireless devices were about the size of a loaf of bread, ran on 110V power, and functioned similarly to a wireless router but also boosted cellular frequencies. The author opined that, if the manufacturer could get the tech approved, instead of paying exorbitant fees for the placement of cellular towers (I looked into buying a home with a cell tower on the property; contractually guaranteed $2k/month income for 20 years on the tower) people would be given free internet service for mounting one of these breadbox "routers" on the outside of their home/apartment. The author further opined that, given slight modifications, instead of simply boosting cellular frequencies, the boxes could function as their own independent cellular network. The power restrictions, at that time, were such that they could be powered by (If I remember correctly) a 3'X5' solar panel in many locations in the US to expand the network into areas where wired power was problematic.

    This type of " internet mesh" currently only works in densely populated, urban, environments but as wireless technology continues to advance at breakneck speeds, traditional cable-and cellular-companies are going to find their services in progressively lower demand. They will be forced actually compete because of their unwillingness to license their hardware or infrastructure.
     
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  3. me just sayin

    me just sayin Diamond Member

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  4. TisMyDroid

    TisMyDroid Super Moderator
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    That actually happened before NN rules were in place but it is just an sample of what we can expect now that us consumers have no protection.

    Those in support of Ajit Pai's argument that getting rid of NN protections will be good for innovation and strengthen the "free market" only works if there is competition. As has been mentioned already, when it comes to home internet ISP's, there is no choice. You're stuck with whichever ISP is available. Most often it is only one provider. You're lucky if you have two. Until that changes, we are at the mercy of the ISP companies and believe me, they care about $$$$, not us!

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
     
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  5. pc747

    pc747 Administrator
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    I won't doubt that if a smart company could get that implemented and provide reliable service at a reasonable price they will have market in your metros. The small and medium towns will still be subject to the "lack of competition", as you pointed out. I would like to see that implemented.
    Though the rules of NN protected us from "fast lanes", we still saw carriers finding ways around this. We saw various carriers this year already offer zero usage counted for select services. Verizon was able to limit smartphones to 720P, and att was offering plans for those that used their directv services.

    Even if we were to turn the clock back and keep NN, we still haven't solved the problem. With that said, removing NN gave the carriers more ammo.

    If we stepped back and was honest I think we would find the viable solution being a mix of both sides of the argument.

    Unfortunately because this removing of NN was more about money and less about finding a means to allow for competition by backing the regulations down to the minimum basics that focused on protection from fast lanes, we are left in the wind while we wait for competition to keep the big carriers in check.

    They should drop the title 2 portion and cut back from being able to discriminate against data usage. Force companies to be transparent. And for companies looking to receive any type of government payment be required to follow the minimum agreed upon regulations that will keep the companies from being able to develop fast lanes.

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  6. Narsil

    Narsil Silver Member

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    Here's what the FCC commissioner under George Bush and Barak Obama has to say on the issue on MSNBC.

     
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  7. pc747

    pc747 Administrator
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    Despi
    Thanks for posting.

    Despite being for NN, the host was being unprofessional. The guest was actually professional and made a lot of good points. And Ali Velsi missed the fact that att being able to bundle with their directv services happended when NN was still in play. So his argument there was off.

    To me that is my issue with many things that become political. People go "if you don't see it my way you're stupid" when the reality was that both sides had some weaknesses.

    Ali Velsi missed a chance to have a good discussion because he was trying to cause an argument versus allow the interviewee to continue a very informative point. Then they could have turned that to a discussion on how we could improve on a plan that allowed the growth without so much federal intervention, also while protecting the consumers from being slowed down unnecessarily.

    Because despite all this talk of NN all 4 carrier have been caught throttling their customers and they continued despite what the FCC said with the NN in place. So NN in a way failed to be able to show enough teeth at times when it was warranted.

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  8. pc747

    pc747 Administrator
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  9. me just sayin

    me just sayin Diamond Member

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    yep was a gotcha... I have seen the same with water, electric and other utilities companies in my area. they have no problems providing service outside of their areas as long as you paid for the infrastructure.
     
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