Moto explains why they locked the bootloader

Discussion in 'Motorola Droid X' started by titans, Jul 14, 2010.

  1. garath

    garath Member

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    They have a right to protect their IP. You aren't just buying the hardware. You are buying a phone - hardware and software. It's yours to do what you want. Just because they have locked down the software doesn't make it any less yours. You got exactly what you paid for. If you don't agree with it, you can buy a different phone. However, if you like their product, you can buy it as is.

    It is absolutely different than a PC. On a PC you are implicitly buying the hardware. The hardware and software are two different products regardless of their bundling. The DroidX is a consumer device. You aren't buying two different products, it's one. The software is part of it. Changing that is changing the device itself.
     
  2. sin vicious

    sin vicious Member

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    Agree 100%.. no one has been duped or tricked into buying this product. I think the more important point is the un-intended consequences opening things up may cause. The road to hell is pathed with good intentions!! I am willing to give up flashing as a whole if it facilitates better devices being released as rapidly as they are now.
     
  3. h_10

    h_10 Member

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    HTC doesn't seem to have a problem with this. and what IP is moto trying to protect? it's not like the have a great GUI like Sense that they are trying to keep competitors from stealing. motoblur is crap.

    i respect moto's decision to lock the bootloader. but i will exercise my right as a consumer and not buy their products. it may not mean much to motorola but at the end of the day, it doesn't mean much to me either as there are and will plenty of alternative android phones which aren't locked.
     
  4. sin vicious

    sin vicious Member

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    Bravo your going about it the right way.. perhaps MOTO can find a way to offset any loss of revenue and provide the means to open things up.. allowing the market (us the people) to dictate the terms spurs compeition which we all stand to benefit from. Either way im getting the droidx.. dancedroid, screen ..gaming possibilties, raw power..
     
  5. Darkseider

    Darkseider Senior Member

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    Hell ain't a bad place. Hell is from here to eternity.
     
  6. EgooEspada

    EgooEspada Member

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    Does Moto not realize that the Motorola Droid was one of the best selling devices and still is because it was stock and easily cracked. Motorola has done everything right with these devices, but now they do this to mess it all up. They could of easily trumped the iPhone alone with their strategy like that of with the original Droid and the only phones with the full Android experience (excluding the N1).
    But I will say though, if they make the Droid Pro UI stock Gingerbread and with those awesome specs going around here, I'll be fine with it..
     
  7. Darkseider

    Darkseider Senior Member

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    What IP? Really? They use off the shelf parts, including the SoC, and throw it together in a case. I am not a lawyer but my understanding is as follows. The operating system is open source and under the Apache license. I am sure that some of the software that Motorola includes stock on Android is licensed in part or wholly under the GPL v3. In which case according to the Apache license the entire OS and everything contained therein falls under the GPL V3.

    GPL compatibility

    The Apache Software Foundation and the Free Software Foundation (FSF) agree that the Apache License 2.0 is a free software licence, compatible with version 3 of the GNU General Public License (GPL).[6]
    However, the Free Software Foundation considers all versions of the Apache License (as of 2007) to be incompatible with the previous GPL versions 1 and 2.[7][8]
    It should be noted, however, that there is a one-way incompatibility between the Apache version 2 and GPL version 3 licenses, in that you cannot include GPL version 3 code in an Apache project without activating the requirement that the entire project be relicensed under the GPL version 3.[9]

    In which case by encrypting the boot loader and denying the ability to root the device is a breech of the GPL V3 because even if the source code is available it cannot be modified for use on the device due to these restrictions. Any one else following this?

    EDIT: I just contacted the FSF asking this very question to see if there is any merit to my ramblings. I will keep you updated with their response if I get one.
     
  8. steven.rn

    steven.rn Member

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    Yep, I haven't heard of anyone successfully bricking a droid.

    But "bricking" is a BUILT IN FEATURE of the X. A software command will invoke it. And no one but verizon can unbrick it. Yes it can be undone- not by you or me.

    That's the whole point of EFUSE, as I understand it. A bad OTA update could brick the phone so it can't be recovered until it visits Verizon.

    You don't think this is an incredible vulnerability? Heck, if we have faith that someone can over come the encryption, and the hardware locks- I can't imagine it wouldn't be 1000 times easier to blow the EFUSE by some exploit.

    Dangerous stuff. Don't get me wrong, I'm still getting an X. I just don't know if this ever happens that there will BE a motorola in the future. That's all I'm saying. And it could even happen to someone who would never, ever think of doing anything not stock.
     
  9. Mule65

    Mule65 Member

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    You can't delete stock apps from the app drawer without root access. But, you don't have to put them on your home screens. Not a big deal.
     
  10. garath

    garath Member

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    This is where I take issue with your stance. I fully appreciate the people that WANT to flash custom ROMs for their own benefit and in turn will not be buying the device. That's their choice and I support that. I do NOT understand the sense of entitlement some people have when it comes to the device. Rather than saying "the phone doesn't support my needs, I will look elsewhere", the approach is "I am going to boycott, sue, march outside their offices until they MAKE it the way I want it". I understand your desire to prevent future phones from other manufacturers to follow suit, but the only way to do that is to speak with the wallet. No matter the outrage on enthusiast forums, if the phone sells well that's that.

    Even though this article is from 2007, it points out some key things about handset makers and their own proprietary software.

    Why Google chose the Apache Software License over GPLv2 for Android

    Availability of Android under the ASL will ensure that a broader number of companies will be able to adopt the platform and build on top of it without having to expose the inner workings of proprietary technologies that give them a competitive advantage.
     
  11. sic0048

    sic0048 Member

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    There are less than 100k members on this forum. What % of those root and want to load custom ROMs? Perhaps 10%, maybe 25% at most. While I realize this isn't the only forum of it's kind, you can see that the hacking community is a small % of users.

    I haven't seen any recent Droid sales numbers, but it took 72 days for Motorola to sell 1,000,000 units when it first came out. I'm sure sales have slowed since then. So perhaps 1,500,000 units have been sold in total.

    Lets say that 88,000 users represents all Droid users on all forums combined. After all there are 88,000 members of this forum, and the represent a lot more phones than just the Droid.

    Lets say 25% of all those members root their Droid - equals 22,000 people. That would account for 1.5% of all Droid users. This for a phone that is easily hacked so more users are willing to try to root.

    I realize these numbers are not scientific or even that accuate at all. But my point in all of this is to show that rooting isn't a large % of users. I have no doubt that Motorola makes/saves more money by encrypting their systems than the lost sales (perhaps 1-2%) that they would gain by actually not encypting their systems.

    The bottom line is that all the hackers could rise up and boycott Motorola and it won't change Motorola's stance. The money equation just doesn't work in our favor.
     
  12. tt8698

    tt8698 New Member

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    Moto does realize that the droid is the most popular android on the market? and the fact that the community behind it is the strongest and one of the most developed I do not understand why they would do this to all there phones most ppl who don't know how to root do not because they don't understand it I may be making a switch to htc because of this reason next time my contract is up now I'm fustrated haha

    Sent from my Droid using Tapatalk
     
  13. RolandDeschain

    RolandDeschain Member

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    Even though I'll have a Droid X, I actually wish someone would make a virus that ends up bricking all Droid Xs. It'd be a PR disaster for Motorola, and they'd fall more in line with future devices. They're starting to be like the "Apple" of Verizon. I don't care how great your vision for phones is, I don't want it force-fed to me, Motorola. *glare*

    Definitely the last Motorola device I'll be buying.
     
  14. sin vicious

    sin vicious Member

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    Well said... i just dont understand droiders would want to stifle innovation or create an environment where phones would cost us 700.00-800.00 to cover lost revenues.
     
  15. mflynn

    mflynn New Member

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    With that said and I agree with you, does the average consumer care?

    I mean just look at how they flock to iPhone. I bet if I walk into my verizon store right now, and ask the salesman (or woman) about the encrypted boot loader, I'd get a blank stare. Only a small minority care about this, in so much that it will have no affect on moto's bottom line nor will it ever.

    Personally, I'm having a hard time justifying dropping my Nexus for the droid x.
     
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