Battery life questions

Discussion in 'Motorola Droid MAXX' started by BrodoSwaggins, Dec 24, 2013.

  1. jackiescivic

    jackiescivic Diamond Member

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    FoxKat, just to clarify for my own brain, you are saying that it is best to charge the phone to 80% and let it discharge only to as low as 20% and plug it in as needed to keep it between those levels. That will help with the life expectancy of the battery?

    Sent from my Droid Maxx
     
  2. FoxKat

    FoxKat Premium Member
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    Actually Jackie, that's exactly what I'm saying. The evidence is overwhelming and shown in detail on www.batteryuniversity.com... Let me find the link.

    http://www.batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/how_to_prolong_lithium_based_batteries

    "Similar to a mechanical device that wears out faster with heavy use, so also does the depth of discharge (DoD) determine the cycle count. The shorter the discharge (low DoD), the longer the battery will last. If at all possible, avoid full discharges and charge the battery more often between uses. Partial discharge on Li-ion is fine; there is no memory and the battery does not need periodic full discharge cycles to prolong life, other than to calibrate the fuel gauge on a smart battery once in a while. Read more about Battery Calibration."


    "Most Li-ions are charged to 4.20V/cell and every reduction of 0.10V/cell is said to double cycle life. For example, a lithium-ion cell charged to 4.20V/cell typically delivers 300–500 cycles. If charged to only 4.10V/cell, the life can be prolonged to 600–1,000 cycles; 4.00V/cell should deliver 1,200–2,000 and 3.90V/cell 2,400–4,000 cycles. Table 4 summarizes these results. The values are estimate and depend on the type of li-ion-ion battery."

    Charge Cycles.png

    The two quotes above when combined say that either charging to the maximum charge capacity (4.2V), or draining to the minimum capacity (about 3.65V) will both shorten the lifespan of the battery, and if you do both, the results are exponentially worse. Conversely, shortening the charging and discharging cycles to between 80% and 20% of full capacity should keep from both charging to high voltages (i.e. 100% or about 4.2V), and from discharging to the minimum (i.e. 0%, or about 3.65V).

    A 4.2V to 3.65V range gives you about a .55V range. So a .1V reduction in charge to 4.1V instead of 4.2V would equal a reduction of approximately 18.18% of .55V or 18.18% of 100% of capacity, or about 81.2% of a full charge when you remove it from the charger. Likewise, 0% plus .1V or 18.18% would leave the battery at 18.18% when you resume charge.

    By doing the above, you could extend the battery's lifespan to well over 1,000 100% charge cycles, and closer to 2,000 100% cycles, where each cycle would be about 1.57 charges and 1.57 discharges each of about 63.6% of full capacity. Rounding to 20% and 80% makes the math much easier... In other words, from 20% to 80% = 60% charge, and back down to 20% = 60% discharge. So to equal 100% charge and 100% discharge (a full charge cycle), you would have to charge to 80%, use to 20% (60%), then charge to 80% and use to 40% (40%), and so 60% + 40% = 100%), or any combination thereof.

    To make it easier, think of a gas tank that you always fill when it dips below 1/8 of a tank or so (since you never want to run out of gas), and the pump shuts off automatically at about 7/8 of its maximum capacity, since you KNOW you can ALWAYS get at least another gallon or two in there after the pump shuts off.

    So you would potentially be able to get as many as 1,000-1,500, or possibly 2,000 or more 60% charge and discharge cycles, as well as another 1,000-1,500 (or again possibly 2,000 or more), 40% charge and discharge cycles, or a combined total of 1,000-1,500, to upwards of 2,000 or more full 100% cycles.

    Sent from my XT1080 using Tapatalk
     
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  3. Luici

    Luici New Member

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    I got my Droid Maxx last thursday, and I have charged the phone 4-5 times. I listen internet radio alot, I use Radio Tunein. Is this normal useage for the phone?

    maxx 013.png maxx 014.png maxx 015.png

    about 6h and the phone is dead.

    My old phone Razr maxx HD does way better, after 2h 45min of internet radio, theres still 75% battery left. And end of my work day, listening 7h internet radio, 30min facebook, theers still 10-15% battery left.

    Please don´t tell me thats normal for Droid Maxx.
     

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  4. xeene

    xeene Gold Member

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    What is H+ network? Considering your poor signal quality, I'd say it's normal.
     
  5. Luici

    Luici New Member

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    I live in Finland, it´s finnish network sign. The razr maxx had same kind of signal, and the battery lasted alot better, so why maxx battery does not last longer. I tested this with Wi-fi, and the phone was dead after 6.5 hours, with full wi-fi signal.

    E = EDGE (Enhanced Data Rates for Global Evolution)
    H/ H+ = Is faster version of 3G. data from the network max. 21 Mbit/s or max. 42 Mbit/s

    The network is bad because I work in warehouse, there is bad signal.

    When I´m home the signal is full, but the battery drains sooo much faster that my razr maxx.
     
  6. Luici

    Luici New Member

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    Could someone test their own Maxx for example with radio Tunein. Starting with full battery and post how much the phone has power left after 1 hour. With Wi-Fi or with your phones network. I would like to see the differences and compare those to my own maxx.

    I´m very disappointed if the maxx battery really is as poor as it has shown to be. I love the phone but it´s useless to me with that kind of battery life and I need to take my Razr maxx back to use, theres a battery that still suprice me.
     
  7. Luici

    Luici New Member

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    You are right, the bad signal killed my battery. I switched my network to use only GSM, and the signal is full all the time. And my battery does two times better than earlier.
     
  8. galletta

    galletta New Member

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    Beware of Calibration Issues

    Professor Foxcat has provided some evidence that the batteries are better kept at 80% maximum and 20% minimum. One caveat is that we don't know the actual calibration of what the phone calls 100% and 0%.

    For instance, my Chevy Volt reports the number of miles, so in summer, when at full charge it says 41 miles. When it gets to 0 miles, I'm told it is actually at 15% of the remaining charge. I've read that will prevent electrical problems with the battery of some sort or other, which could cause serious harm to the battery.

    Therefore, Moto might have the charger to indicate 0% left in the same way, when the battery is physically at 15%. In the same way, who's to say that they call 100% the physical maximum? If 80% would result in more battery life and even perhaps more safe operation, my guess is that they would stop charging and call it 100% at whatever level is best.

    So I would not set an alarm to disconnect my phone at 80% or power it down at 20% without being sure of the top and bottom calibration limits. If they already have set 20% as what is reported as 0% and 80% as what is reported as 100%, then you'll actually be stopping the charging process at 64% (80% charged x 80% max) and powering down at 36% (100% minus 80% discharged x 80% discharged min). My math might not be correct but you get the idea.
     
  9. doogald

    doogald Active Member

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    We know that the 0% level is deliberately set high to prevent bad things that happen when true zero is hit. It's very likely that the max is slightly lower than true max - again, because Li-ion can be very, very badly affected by high heat at full charge.

    However, your scheme above is supposedly the perfect way to run a Li-ion battery. Try to prevent full discharges, try to avoid full charges, and you will get maximum life from your battery, because the stress of large charge cycles leads to fewer charge cycles over the life of the battery pack. See How to Prolong Lithium-based Batteries - Battery University for a great article about these issues, including the depth of discharge affect on the lifespan of a battery pack.
     
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