Apple Infuriating Customers By Auto Bricking Their iPhones!

Wow.... a little angry this morning JK? ROFL!

S5 tap'n
The more I think about this situation, the more I get pissed off. I don't intend to own an iPhone any time soon, but I'd be more than furious if this happened to me and I'm upset for the unknowing folks who've had or will have this happen.

This, to me is like killing a tiny spider with napalm and no warning to the unsuspecting soul who paid good money for the house that the spider is in.
 
I just wonder what's next..if I buy a Shelby mustang or a zl1 Camaro and have their oil changed at my local garage...are they going to say their tuning could be violated or messed with and shut my car down?? Slippery slope...
 
I have to agree with Mr. Jonny Kansas here. This is just preposterous for the sheer fact that, if you buy a device, that device is yours and you should be able to do with it what you please. This reminds me of when I was a little kid and I would get gifts from my dad and step-mom, my step-mom had this view that, even though the gifts were given to me, they still belonged to her/my dad because they bought the gifts. Even as a little kid, I knew this concept was whack.

I think a similar concept is happening here. Apple is essentially saying, "Hey, we know you paid for this device and it is legally yours, but we manufactured it so we still want to control what you do with it and there will be dire consequences if you do something we do not approve of."

Long story short, Apple is akin to an evil step-mother.
 
I am all for freedom to use, modify or repair MY devices as I see fit but .... beware folks. If the TPP (Trans Pacific Partenership) gets ratified, we will see the floodgates opened to prohibit any work or replacement on all kinds of items we use. Forget flashing ROMS, replacing firmware in routers, performance parts in connected cars. This is not a tin foil hat rant, rather the constant eroding of freedoms in the quest for security and control. It will not be a surprise to see any manufacturers do what Apple is doing in this instance. Most things we use today have some sort of electronics or digital content inside them and they will be subject to TPP regulations.

"The TPP’s anti-circumvention provisions, if adopted, would introduce new barriers to users’ abilities to tinker with their devices and content, even for entirely lawful purposes." EFF.org

Source and links: Trade Officials Sign the TPP But It's Still Up to Lawmakers to Reject It
 
I just wonder what's next..if I buy a Shelby mustang or a zl1 Camaro and have their oil changed at my local garage...are they going to say their tuning could be violated or messed with and shut my car down?? Slippery slope...
A similar scenario is why the law linked into the thread near the beginning was enacted. I remember back in the early 80s new GM products warranties were voided if we used gasoline that had ethanol in it because it ate up the fuel lines and other inner fuel related parts. Back then only mom and pop gas stations had ethanol and when you were out in the boonies there just weren't big name stations around. If you took your vehicle in for service and it turned out to be rotted fuel system parts not only did they not cover it but it voided the warranty as well. It's why there was no ethanol in gasoline for a while until the fed forced it back.

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I am all for freedom to use, modify or repair MY devices as I see fit but .... beware folks. If the TPP (Trans Pacific Partenership) gets ratified, we will see the floodgates opened to prohibit any work or replacement on all kinds of items we use. Forget flashing ROMS, replacing firmware in routers, performance parts in connected cars. This is not a tin foil hat rant, rather the constant eroding of freedoms in the quest for security and control. It will not be a surprise to see any manufacturers do what Apple is doing in this instance. Most things we use today have some sort of electronics or digital content inside them and they will be subject to TPP regulations.

"The TPP’s anti-circumvention provisions, if adopted, would introduce new barriers to users’ abilities to tinker with their devices and content, even for entirely lawful purposes." EFF.org

Source and links: Trade Officials Sign the TPP But It's Still Up to Lawmakers to Reject It
TPP is NAFTA on steroids. It'll destroy what's left of our manufacturing economy.

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The bottom line is that anyone affected by this should be entitled to either a free repair or phone and compensation. If they now warn you *AND* provide replacement at a reasonable cost, then okay.

Doing this without warning or explanation in advance is negligent and criminal.
 
I wonder if it's embedded in the legaleze of the tos that hardly anybody reads?

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This is what Apple is saying in response to all this.

S5 tap'n
No I mean the actual user ends agreement that users accept or not. The gazillion pages of legaleze that they suggest be read before accepting updates and what not. I wonder if there's any wording that unauthorized repairs WILL cause permanent failure. In most cases its worded "may" and "have the right to...." but not just plain old words like " will destroy all onboard data".

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Why does it have to brick the device and destroy all onboard data though? As I understand it a lack of needed code toggle causes the phone to basically self destruct minus the pyrotechnics. A lock out trigger I could understand but I don't see the need for the nuclear option choice only, especially in world markets without Apple store support.

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There is no way to tell who is attempting to break the encryption. Once encryption is broken, all device data is destroyed. That's the point of encryption.
 
There are a number of things that can be done. Disable the radio, throw up a warning, whatever. The key here is that people were unaware. That is inexcusable.

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Wow...just wow...I would be really upset if I were an IPhone user.

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I have read quite a few boards with 100's of apple users who are extremely pissed because this isn't just the replacement of the TouchID sensor, many are reporting that this is also if your TouchID sensor isn't functioning 100% or it's just broken, and hasn't been fixed yet. Apple is going to get in some very hot water about this, because once the user purchases the phone, it is that users property. While i do agree that apple has the right to security of the device, there needs to be safeguards in place. Apple cannot just destroy someone's property and then say well you need to pay 300$+ to get a new one.... umm no, you can figure out how to disable to TouchID until a new unit has been installed and security re-established, or have a permanent switch to disable this functionality if the user never wants to use TouchID again.

I completely understand that it can be against the Terms and Services but apple cannot simple take someone's device and then basically hold it for ransom after the fact by saying that no it's not really your device anymore, it's mine. This will turn into a HUGE debate as to who actually owns phones and the software on them. To have people pay upwards of 800 dollars for a device and then if the device breaks, they get it repaired at somewhere other then an Apple Authorized repair shop, that they will brick the phone and make you pay 300 dollars to get a refurbished one. Even if it just resets the device, so that the enclave where the fingerprints were stored was wiped and you could set the device back up, that would be semi-acceptable, but to merely say you can no longer use the phone is stepping out on a very thin line, which i'm not sure they will have a leg to stand on, even if it states it within their agreements.
 
There is no way to tell who is attempting to break the encryption. Once encryption is broken, all device data is destroyed. That's the point of encryption.

Which would be acceptable at least in my book, if i owned an Iphone and the only way to get a non-apple authorized repair on the screen or TouchID sensor was to wipe the phone and reset it back up. The fact is that this is not what's happening, it's basically giving them an error, and Apple is saying you can pay us for a new phone (refurbished) or your device won't work again, is unacceptable. As another user states that TouchID is a feature that can be toggled on and off in the menu's, and if that's possible, then why not just permanently disable TouchID until it can be fixed by an authorized apple repair shop? It's not like apple doesn't know that people get their devices fixed at other places.
 
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