Turbo battery get better after "break-in" period?

Discussion in 'Motorola Droid Turbo' started by Pologuy, Jan 16, 2015.

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  1. Pologuy

    Pologuy Member

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    I read somewhere, I think on the Motorola site where someone was complaining about the batter life, that the battery needed a "break-in" period.

    Now, while I really didn't think that sounded right at first - now, I am not so sure.

    I have had my phone for just over a month now and am consistently getting more than 40 hours and there have been quite a few days were I got more than 2 days on my battery...

    Anyone else notice this?
     
  2. Jonny Kansas

    Jonny Kansas Administrator
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    For any of these devices, when you first get them, you spend a lot of time setting them up and then find excuses to pull them out an use them. It's new and fun.

    While a battery and device will adapt a bit after some time, you also have to consider your own usage. I would imagine you have the phone out of your pocket with the screen on far less than you did a month ago.
     
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  3. Pologuy

    Pologuy Member

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    Well, yes, but my point was that it now lasts very close to, and sometimes exceeding, what Motorola stated of - 2 days...
     
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  4. Jonny Kansas

    Jonny Kansas Administrator
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  5. FoxKat

    FoxKat Premium Member
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    And I'll echo @Jonny Kansas in his comments. There is some misinformation about these batteries and there is lots that is so wrong out there that it's sad. Truth is, these batteries themselves do not get any better with each charge, whether a full or partial charge, than they were the previous charge. Truth is, like anything that is used and which has a measure of performance tied to a volume or quantity, it will either perform exactly like the last time, or slightly less (as is the case with Lithium Ion batteries). They will NEVER hold more power with the same charge time, voltage and current applied to them than they did the first time they're charged, except for perhaps the first couple cycles the manufacturer puts them through at the factory. Still, even Motorola is guilty of propaganda regarding this. In the online support portal (How to properly charge the device) it states;

    "How do I properly charge my device?

    If you are just setting up your device, new batteries are not fully charged. Plug the supplied battery charger into your phone and an electrical outlet. It may take several seconds to start charging the battery.

    If your battery is completely discharged, it may take several minutes for the device to begin charging. The battery needs to charge to a minimum voltage before the system can boot up, and this may take a few moments to achieve.

    It is best to use the Motorola charger that came with your phone. Chargers have different output capacities, and a weak charger will take longer to charge your battery. If you are using the device heavily at the time, it may be possible for a weak charger to fail to provide enough energy to actually charge at all.

    Important note: The Motorola Turbo charger will charge the device at a faster rate when the device is below 78%. If the device is already at 78% or higher, it will charge at regular speed.

    During initial set up of your device, once you have added your accounts (Google and any others) your device will typically transfer significant data while it initially synchronizes your accounts and updates applications from the Play Store. Your phone's battery may drain faster than usual during this initial update and sync session. After the initial sync, and a few charging cycles, your battery will reach its maximum capacity. We strongly recommend keeping the phone attached to the charger during the initial sync.

    It may take several charging cycles for your battery to reach optimum performance."

    The Blue text above I completely agree with and that again echo's Jonny's comments. The Red text, I am at odds with. The implication is that the battery will get better with successive charges (reach a higher capacity to hold a charge). Nothing in Lithium Ion technology could be farther from the truth. What they are saying and what it implies are two different things.

    The Red text is really another (however poorly worded) way to restate what is in Blue, that is that as your phone settles into your usage profile and as it stops bringing to you new features in a baby-step process that was implemented by the manufacture so as to not overload you with all the features at once, it will consume less and less power for the same timeframe, with all other things being equal such as usage patterns. Once you've been spoon-fed all the features, and you've settled into a routine, this is when you will see the battery's full potential, not becuase it has gotten any more powerful, but because you are using less power overall.

    Both sentences in Red could have been fixed by replacing "battery" with "phone". Edit; Also, using "charging cycles" as the differentiator rather than days or simply time, is again misleading.

    • It will take "time" (and also or therefore power), for your phone to do all the sync'ing it needs to from the initial setup to when it's fully sync'd.
    • It will take "time" for you to become acclimated with all the features and decide which ones benefit you and which ones you are not going to be using.
    • It will take "time" for you to get faster in doing the same tasks with your phone, such as typing or swyping text, knowing where the icon for a particular app is, etc.
    • It will take "time" for the phone to become accustomed to your usage patterns and any built-in applications that use your usage patterns as a gauge for how frequently it does things like check your location or pull your email or social networking.
    It's this "time" (and again also or therefore increased power consumption for the same time period), that it will use less-efficiently during the first few days, week or longer (again depending on your personal usage pattern), and which will influence how soon you reach YOUR optimum battery usage and see YOUR PERSONAL battery's maximum potential to power the phone. It just so happens that they are using "charging cycles" interchangeably as a measure of time, assuming that you will charge every day or two. So to summarize, it will take perhaps 2 to 6 days minimum (1-6 charging cycles), and can be upwards several weeks (and many more cycles), before your phone and you are in syncopato and you experience the maximum length of "time" your phone can be operated with one charge of the battery.
     
    #5 FoxKat, Jan 16, 2015
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2015
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