am i alone here or is pinch to shrink an odd thing

Vitticeps

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Aren't all words "made up"? They all came into existence somehow. :)

And pinch to zoom (as someone already pointed out) is still correct. The word zoom doesn't specifically mean "make it bigger", it simply means you are changing how large/small the subject appears. Zooming out is still zoom.

Trying to apply conventional linguistics to terms used in modern technology is senseless. The industry/field/culture that spawns the term is the ultimate deciding faction on proper use and pronunciation, even if the word already exists with another meaning and/or pronunciation.
 

mikes

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LOL. Yes, they're words. Yes, they're used in English. Now go look up "ain't." Now feel free to add that word to your vocabulary, so you can continue to demonstrate your literacy.
 

mikes

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The word zoom doesn't specifically mean "make it bigger", it simply means you are changing how large/small the subject appears. Zooming out is still zoom.
I submit that zoom does mean "make it bigger." If you're operating a camera lens, and are told to "zoom," which way do you go?

Even if we accept your argument that zoom can apply to either direction, since pinching only works in one, "pinch to zoom" is still incorrect.

As "zoom" alone is most commonly understood to enlarge, it can only be correct to say "pinch to zoom out." (or "spread to zoom in," or "spread to zoom")
 

kevin1016

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Here's a fun word: epitome

As in: "This thread is the epitome of a nerd conversation."
 

kristoff125

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If it was on wikipedia it must be true. :wink:

Government Federal constitutional republic
- President Barack Obama (D)
- Vice President Joe Biden (D)
- Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D)
- Chief Justice John Roberts
There's some info I pulled off wikipedia I guess it must be wrong though, because clearly everything is wrong if it's on wikipedia.
 

aminaked

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I submit that zoom does mean "make it bigger." If you're operating a camera lens, and are told to "zoom," which way do you go?

Even if we accept your argument that zoom can apply to either direction, since pinching only works in one, "pinch to zoom" is still incorrect.

As "zoom" alone is most commonly understood to enlarge, it can only be correct to say "pinch to zoom out." (or "spread to zoom in," or "spread to zoom")

Language isn't always perfect and it would be really inefficient to cover every case all the time. Should we settle this and call it "pinch to zoom out and spread to zoom in" from now on?

Anyway, this is all semantics. For some substance, I just wanted to repeat that I like xScope after the latest update. It has what I called "tap and swipe to zoom" but the developer calls "pin zoom". Literally, we might call it "double tap and swipe right to zoom in and swipe left to zoom out". Kinda cool.
 

kristoff125

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to bring a subject, scene, etc., into closeup or cause it to recede into a long shot using a zoom lens and while maintainingfocus.
Definition of zoom from dictionary.com, pinch to zoom works, don't need to explain the whole process of how it works, pinch to zoom is what we'll be calling it, stop trying to change the world, one phrase at a time.
 

C3-PO

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Aren't all words "made up"? They all came into existence somehow. :)

And pinch to zoom (as someone already pointed out) is still correct. The word zoom doesn't specifically mean "make it bigger", it simply means you are changing how large/small the subject appears. Zooming out is still zoom.

You're right. When you're talking about a 2D space zooming and shrinking are the same thing.

The English language is so jacked up, arguing about semantics is an excersize in futility.
 
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