Wow, does this phone pocket dial alot.

jsh1120

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A couple of points.

First, though it seems counter-intuitive, there is considerable evidence that limiting phone use to hands-free devices does NOT make it a safer practice. In fact, hands-free phone use is just as dangerous as holding the phone to your ear.

Why might this be? And why is talking on the phone different from talking to a passenger in the car? The answer seems to be that when the driver talks on the phone (however it's done) (s)he goes to a different psychological "space" that (s)he shares with the person on the other end of the line. When both parties are in the car, on the other hand, they each are "in the same place" and respond to the traffic environment in the same way, altering their conversation to deal with their shared environment.

You can understand this if you'll think about the number of times you have to tell someone you're talking to, "Wait a sec, I have to turn here" and other such lines.

There have been multiple studies of the phenomenon and I know of no study that has found holding the phone is significantly more dangerous than using a hands free system. On the other hand, no pun intended, texting while driving is simply insane. Not only is it a danger from a distraction standpoint, it involves active use of your hands for something other than using the steering wheel. The only thing more dangerous I can imagine is giving yourself a pedicure at 70 mph.

In short, there is much less difference than one might expect between the effects of using a hands free device to chat and a handheld phone. Both are dangerous. And if I see a solitary driver chatting away to the air in their car, I avoid them. Stop talking on the d**n phone and drive!

Second, the "no call log" app corrects what I think is an error in the selection of a default action for ending a call. The assumption seems to be that the most likely next action after ending a call is to call the person you just spoke to again. In my experience this simply isn't the case. Perhaps the design was settled on to deal with AT&T and other carriers with lots of dropped calls. :)
 

TBV

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A couple of points.

First, though it seems counter-intuitive, there is considerable evidence that limiting phone use to hands-free devices does NOT make it a safer practice. In fact, hands-free phone use is just as dangerous as holding the phone to your ear.

Why might this be? And why is talking on the phone different from talking to a passenger in the car? The answer seems to be that when the driver talks on the phone (however it's done) (s)he goes to a different psychological "space" that (s)he shares with the person on the other end of the line. When both parties are in the car, on the other hand, they each are "in the same place" and respond to the traffic environment in the same way, altering their conversation to deal with their shared environment.

Me: In the back and forth between myself and ShowTime, there didn't seem to be a disagreement as to whether there was danger in talking on the phone versus not talking on the phone, just the difference between going hands-free or not...

If you want to place your bet on a theory as to what happens to a person's 'psychological space' when talking to someone on the phone as opposed to someone in the car, so be it, but I will just rely on good old common sense: I believe I (and probably the vast majority of people) can respond faster to a situation on the road if I do not have a foreign object in my hand, planted next to my ear. (shrugs shoulders)

You can understand this if you'll think about the number of times you have to tell someone you're talking to, "Wait a sec, I have to turn here" and other such lines.

Me: I guess I cannot understand that because that example has never happened to me.


...:) :motdroidvert: ... .
 

djk_dnb

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Many who have posted in this thread have offered very valid points. It can not be argued that driving in the absence of distractions is the safest way to get from point A to point B. With that said, and all things considered, I am still of the opinion that if you can't drive and talk without swerving, speeding, etc., then your driver's license should be revoked. In fact, I think talking on the phone while driving should be part of any and all driving tests seeing as how it should be assumed that people are going to do it regardless of common sense and/or local laws.

There is no such thing as a perfect driver. No one is infallible. However, the fact remains that some people are simply more capable than others where multi tasking is concerned. There are any number of things that will divide a driver's attention on any trip, so it all boils down to the fact that those who are unable to effectively process and execute more than one task at a time ought not be allowed to get behind the wheel.

Just my two cents.
 

jsh1120

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A couple of points.


If you want to place your bet on a theory as to what happens to a person's 'psychological space' when talking to someone on the phone as opposed to someone in the car, so be it, but I will just rely on good old common sense: I believe I (and probably the vast majority of people) can respond faster to a situation on the road if I do not have a foreign object in my hand, planted next to my ear. (shrugs shoulders)

/QUOTE]

Possibly correct. However, the most effective response to an emergency situation usually doesn't involve your hands; it involves your foot on the brake. And in such situations hands free and hand held devices are equally powerful distractions.

Feel free, of course, to rely on "good old common sense." Personally, I've always found science to a better source of knowledge. I don't have to worry about falling off the edge of what good old common sense tells me is a flat earth, for example.

Hands-Free Cell Phones No Safer for Drivers
 

normwerner

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I can maybe understand the phone making calls when you accidently touch the screen somewhere while it's in your pocket; but, this morning my Droid apparently got lonely while sitting on the dresser by itself and started calling people. That's not only wierd,it's unacceptible.
Norm
 

TBV

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I can maybe understand the phone making calls when you accidently touch the screen somewhere while it's in your pocket; but, this morning my Droid apparently got lonely while sitting on the dresser by itself and started calling people. That's not only wierd,it's unacceptible.
Norm

That same type of thing happened to me on Christmas Day.

We were at friends house that has very spotty VZ coverage, 1 bar @ best in some spots of the house. My phone starts ringing and it's my son, however he is no more than 10 feet away from me, and he is clearly not calling me...we shake our heads, laugh, and a few minutes later, his phone is ringing and the caller ID is showing that I am calling him...again, the phone is not in my pocket, but right there in my hand, and I have not called anyone, let alone him!

We laugh it off again, figuring that they weak signal has the Droid trying to contact other Droids? :reddroid: :icon_ devil:

About 10 minutes later, my wife's Blackberry starts ringing, and the caller ID says it's me...again, I did not make any calls. :icon_eek:

We could obviously never explain what was going on, and it has not happened since.

Weird.
 

Ghostwheel

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*Note to self.........never drive behind, next to, or in front of any of these people in this thread*

LOL at all the people here actually defending their bad "talking on the phone while driving" habit. No matter how good and/or safe you think your driving really is while talking on the phone, just take a step back and put yourself in the car driving behind you - imagine what they are seeing. Just because you think your are a good driver while using your phone...doesn't mean you are.

Like someone mentioned earlier, I'm not trying to preach either, just use some common sense guys.

Agreed. Reminds me of people who are sure they're safe to drive after they've been drinking: "I'm fine to drive drunk, I've been doing it for decades without a single accident - it's all those other morons who can't handle it."
 

mattygabe

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*Note to self.........never drive behind, next to, or in front of any of these people in this thread*

LOL at all the people here actually defending their bad "talking on the phone while driving" habit. No matter how good and/or safe you think your driving really is while talking on the phone, just take a step back and put yourself in the car driving behind you - imagine what they are seeing. Just because you think your are a good driver while using your phone...doesn't mean you are.

Like someone mentioned earlier, I'm not trying to preach either, just use some common sense guys.

Agreed. Reminds me of people who are sure they're safe to drive after they've been drinking: "I'm fine to drive drunk, I've been doing it for decades without a single accident - it's all those other morons who can't handle it."
Hey man, I'm just buzzed.
 
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