NO Root For Note 5 or Galaxy S6 Edge + EVER! Thanks To Knox!

If they are going to do this to us they should at least remove the bloat and not have multiple apps that do the same thing installed. If we want say another email app we know were to get one.
 
Ahhh some dev is going to see this as a challenge.

My have times changed.... an article like this 2-3 years ago would have resulted in mass emails, tweets, and complaints from the community.

Now, people are like...ehhh Im over my root phase anyway.

I am in that camp. I have not rooted in a long time, and I currently own a nexus 6. There just isn't a huge need for it these days, as the stock ROMs have really gotten a lot better.

I have found that the only real reason that I could use root for is customization, but with a gazillion launchers out there, you can pretty much customize whatever you want with those, for free, without risk of messing up your phone or not getting an OTA, etc...

I have yet to find a custom ROM for this phone that works better than the stock one, they all tend to have at least one issue, or some app of mine that won't run on it...

It reminds me of the PC overclocking era... I started overlocking my PC back on a Cyrix 686 PR133... That's how far back I was doing it, I just dated myself there... haha

It was great to get near the performance of the $900 CPU out of the $300 CPU... But after several years, the law of diminishing returns kicked in and mid range and affordable CPU's were so fast, that risking drying your rig with exotic water cooling systems just to gain another 4% score in a synthetic benchmark, just wasn't worth it any more.

I feel like phones are hitting that point now, from a software perspective...

For those doing it, more power to them, but I think that like the PC, a lot of us that have been doing it a long time, come to realize that as time goes on, you spend a lot of time tweaking and fiddling, and in the end the gains just are not that much...
 
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The only thing I really miss with root is installing viper4android. I had that set up perfectly. Other than that I didn't really find myself utilizing it.

Sent from my XT1060 using Tapatalk
 
We go through these "to root or not to root" discussions from time to time. Basically I see it like this:

Rooted phone: I own the phone and can do what I want.
Unrooted phone: You own the phone and can do what YOU want.

Simple.
 
I started overlocking my PC back on a Cyrix 686 PR133... That's how far back I was doing it, I just dated myself there... haha...

686?? Filthy casual. ;) Just kidding.

My first PC was an IBM 8088...

We go through these "to root or not to root" discussions from time to time. Basically I see it like this:

Rooted phone: I own the phone and can do what I want.
Unrooted phone: You own the phone and can do what YOU want.

Simple.

Read that again. I think you missed a "don't" and a "can't" in there somewhere.
 
686?? Filthy casual. ;) Just kidding.

My first PC was an IBM 8088...



Read that again. I think you missed a "don't" and a "can't" in there somewhere.

No, that was the first PC that I personally overclocked... My first PC was a TI-99, then a Commodore 64, then the Commodore 64+4, then an ATT PC6300(8086), etc... ;-)
 
No, that was the first PC that I personally overclocked... My first PC was a TI-99, then a Commodore 64, then the Commodore 64+4, then an ATT PC6300(8086), etc... ;-)

Those aren't technically "PC's." My first computer was an Osborne Executive. We were so psyched when we upgraded it by swapping out the second 5.25" floppy drive for a 40MB HDD...

serveimage
 
Those aren't technically "PC's." My first computer was an Osborne Executive. We were so psyched when we upgraded it by swapping out the second 5.25" floppy drive for a 40MB HDD...

serveimage

They were not PC's? DO you mean because technically, the term wasn't coined yet?

My school got their first computer... it was a Commodore PET. Keyboard and green CRT all in one case, with a cassette tape drive on the side...
 
IBM coined the term "Personal Computer" as an actual marketing term sometime around 1981. Back then, "PC" meant that something was compatible with IBM's line of Personal Computers. I didn't get into the DOS game until the mid 80's with a PS2 with a screaming 8088 processor and 640KB of RAM. :rolleyes:

Now that I think about it, the PS2 had the 40MB HDD, the Osborne must have had something dramatically smaller.
 
Samsung could, but they won't, provide a secure version of their phone and a consumer version.
Samsung got into bed with the NSA and General Dynamics a couple of years ago.
Press Release Detail
Both the NSA and General Dynamics have Samsung software signing keys.

How many of you would stand for buying a PC and have Dell, Hp or Apple brick your computer if you tried to install another OS?

Just say no to Samdung.
 
Samsung could, but they won't, provide a secure version of their phone and a consumer version.
Samsung got into bed with the NSA and General Dynamics a couple of years ago.
Press Release Detail
Both the NSA and General Dynamics have Samsung software signing keys.

How many of you would stand for buying a PC and have Dell, Hp or Apple brick your computer if you tried to install another OS?

Just say no to Samdung.

Those GD protected phones have nothing to do with the consumer version phones. They were a batch that were flashed for the government under the direction of the NSA. I know I would want NSA grade protection if I were a government employee. No one can best them.

We aren't safe from anyone's prying eyes online anymore so you could approach it two ways. 1. Stay off of the internet. 2. Continue to use the Internet knowing what to expect and adjust your habits accordingly.

Apple gave the source code of iOS to the Chinese government to get into China. That would worry me more than our own NSA having a backdoor to my devices.
 
Actually they do have everything to do with consumer phones.
They have an efuse and KNOX.
The point I was trying to make is that they can easily make a secure and/or non-secure version and have a signed bootloader.

They chose not to.
 
Actually they do have everything to do with consumer phones.
They have an efuse and KNOX.
The point I was trying to make is that they can easily make a secure and/or non-secure version and have a signed bootloader.

They chose not to.

As I mentioned earlier I believe the option to have/not have a rootable phone should be a choice on first boot. I've always rooted just for nandroid purposes, but it looks like that is going away if I stick with Samsung.
 
I have to say, this is exactly why I still have a few hundred downloads of my OG Droid ROM, STILL. It's open, rooted, updated, fast, and free. People still want that openness. It allows anyone to dive in, learn code, improve on things, and discover their inner passion for customization. It's inspiring. But when you lock it all up, people forget about it, lose interest, and find other venues for their creativity.

I actually see Apples lame a$$ phones making a HUGE comeback, even with the 5 (yes 5, can count them all on ONE hand) new improvements, and making Android look like Blackberry, old and obsolete. Nothing REALLY new in Android land, just another version number bump, just like Apple has done for years (and been very successful).

I love my Note 4, BUT I want root back. The phone has serious potential, but it's locked away, never to see the light of day. Such a waste. That's why I'm moving to the Moto X Pure, as soon as I can afford it. It's not Samsung's fault, it's Verizons, for ordering it to be locked down tighter than Fort Knox (pun intended).
 
I think we've blown this out of proportion a bit. Especially with security being such a hot topic these days. I love a rooted device as much as the next guy, but times are changing and you either change with them, or get left behind.
Fact is, it's much more important (& profitable) for AT&T & Verizon to cater to the business community, (as well as the general public) with security concerns at an all time high, than it is with providing a completely unlocked device for a dying root community.
What gets me is, people have been complaining about this for years, yet Verizon & AT&T have always offered either developer edition (and even Google edition devices) for all of it's flagship models. Whether it's a Samsung, HTC, LG and yes, even Motorola. But the fact is, they simply don't sell all that well, and this is one of the reasons they are rarely if ever, available on release day. Another complaint is that DE devices are much more expensive than retail versions and that's not always the case. DE devices are usually released in 64GB variants, so of course it's going to seem a little more expensive than your average 16-32gb variant. Another factor that comes into play is the actual release date. We all know the retail branded devices (as well as subsidized) price of every flagship device drops by at least $50 after the first 30-60 days of being released. Usually by the time a DE model is released, 2-3 months have passed so of course it may seem as if you're paying significantly more for a DE model.
And so what if you have to pay an extra 50 bucks for a DE model? IMO, it's worth having the instant gratification of an unlocked bootloader, as opposed to waiting a few months for someone to gain access via an exploit. Sure, having the option at first boot up would be sweet, as previously mentioned, but that's merely a pipe dream these days. Especially after it cost these two carrier's millions of dollars over the past few years replacing bricked devices for inexperienced users who thought they needed a rooted device because their buddies devIce was rooted.

The point is, we have SO many options available to us as consumers. Options that should satisfy everyone, from your soccer Mom or government employee who's concerned with purchasing a secure device, to your hard core developer and weekend root enthusiast who will settle for nothing less than the ability to freely do what they want with their device.
 
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