Nearly 75% of Android Devices Can Be Accessed By Google If Court Ordered

Discussion in 'Android News' started by DroidModderX, Nov 22, 2015.

  1. DroidModderX

    DroidModderX Super Moderator
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    It seems that older versions of Android which do not use full disk encryption can be remotely accessed by Google. The passcodes can also be bypassed using any of a variety of forensic techniques. Google is even able to reset passcodes remotely. This can be done if Google is court ordered. This can be used to assist law enforcement to grab info off a device, or to view the full contents of a device. This can not be done on devices running Android 5.0 or higher which use full disk encryption. This means that almost 75% of all Android devices are remotely accessible.

    via TheNextWeb
     
  2. liftedplane

    liftedplane Gold Member

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    that's a little bit scary. I wonder if they added the full disk encryption to fix this. I hope that's the reason at least.
     
  3. Jeffrey

    Jeffrey Premium Member
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    I seem to recall reading something about Apple being forced [court ordered] to access an older iPhone. Apple claims their phones no longer have a backdoor access as it creates vulnerability.
     
  4. MissionImprobable

    MissionImprobable Silver Member

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    You are correct. Newer iOS versions can't be accessed by Apple no matter what according to their statements. As for Android, it's interesting to see how many devices are still 'open' to this. I wonder if user encryption matters in those cases or not.
     
  5. akhenax

    akhenax Silver Member

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    What does full disk encryption have to do with remotely accessing a device? If they can authenticate with a master google id/key, then they have full access whether I have full disk encryption or not...right??
     
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  6. tech_head

    tech_head Silver Member

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    The justification is scary. "We can't solve crimes if we can't get access."
    It's for the victims. Yeah, don't believe the hype. "We will get a warrant." Like they always have in the past? Right.
    Read the whole document, it's a scary diatribe and justification for them to be able to search.

    The supreme court has said that a cellphone is an extension of private space. They cannot compel you to unlock your phone.
    So what they would like to do is circumvent the supreme court by reducing security and having the manufacturers provide them with a back door.

    They then go on to say that foreign governments wuld need to ask for access from the US if they are US companies. THis is a flat out lie. Those other governments would do nothing less than prohibit Apple or Google from doing business in their locales unless they get the same access as the US.

    I don't have anything to hide but, that doesn't mean I'm okay with them looking.
    Just say no.
     
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