Microsoft Discontinues Android-to-Windows Tool 'Project Astoria'

Discussion in 'Android News' started by dgstorm, Feb 26, 2016.

  1. dgstorm

    dgstorm Editor in Chief
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    Microsoft confirmed that they have killed off their Android-to-Windows tool called "Project Astoria." There are still three ways that Windows developers can port their apps from to Windows: Web (Westminster), Win32 (Centennial), and iOS (Islandwood). It's obviously notable that this leaves out a direct port from Android to Windows now.

    Here's a quote describing the confusing and complicated nature of this decision by Microsoft,

    "Microsoft pulled Astoria from builds of Windows 10 late last year, saying at the time it wasn't ready. Developers have been wondering what was up ever since, and now Microsoft says it has ended development. The rationale is bizarre, though. The iOS bridge still exists, and Microsoft says it heard from devs that having two mobile app bridges could be "confusing." Therefore, it decided to just do Islandwood and ditch Astoria.

    At the same time, Microsoft is talking up the acquisition of Xamarin, which allows developers to create and manage cross-platform apps. Microsoft says this is a good alternative to Astoria, but the two projects are quite different. Astoria would have allowed Android apps written in Java to work on Windows 10 with minimal alteration, but Xamarin requires the code be in C#. That doesn't help Android developers very much." ~ AndroidPolice

    Here at HQ, we have to agree with the editors at AndroidPolice on this one. We can't fathom why Microsoft would give up so easily on Astoria, especially considering they desperately need more apps to compete.

    Source: Microsoft
     
  2. LoneWolfArcher

    LoneWolfArcher Silver Member

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    Actually this does make sense based on your last statement. If app count is the goal then they don't need both. Most mobile devs develop for both Android and IOS. The devs only need one path to Windows. So Microsoft investing in both paths is a waste because only one is necessary towards their goal.
     
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  3. dgstorm

    dgstorm Editor in Chief
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    Thanks for clarifying this! It's sometimes hard to see the whole picture when you aren't a developer.
     
  4. LoneWolfArcher

    LoneWolfArcher Silver Member

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    Yep, no problem. I think the problem is that Microsoft isn't explaining this very well and, as usual with Microsoft, the bad PR will give them yet another black eye.
     
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