What is so significant about Google selling a phone directly to customers?

brochaos

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well the t-mobile coverage is totally an individual choice. as crazy as it seems to us here, not everybody likes verizon...

i'm not so sure why this phone deserves it's own press conference either. i didn't have HIGH expectations, but i thought they were going to be doing something DIFFERENT, which it doesn't seem like so far.
 

wil318466

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The real difference is a shift in the way the phone companies work.

What is happening, from what I understand, is Google wants to be able to release phones and then have the customer decide which network they want to use their new phone on, not the reverse.

Example : if you were on AT&T, you would pretty much have to use their devices (lets exclude hacked phones for this discussion). This new method is that Google can develop their phone, release it and the customer can pick which network they prefer.

So, instead of being network driven, it'll be product driven. Makes complete sense from the Google point of view, and it could be dangerous for the major networks.

Google can theoretically release a phone and have it on every network one day. This way hardware manufacturers don't have to worry about what network their phone will be exclusive on, it'll be released and everyone can use them.

This is just from what I've read about it. If I'm wrong, someone please jump in and correct me.


-Wil
 

LordKastle

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Nokia phones have been sold unlocked for years now....its nothing new. Just ask Europe.
 

brochaos

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thats true...but whats the point if you can only get 3g on one carrier...tmobile? the consumer isn't getting much of a choice...

The real difference is a shift in the way the phone companies work.

What is happening, from what I understand, is Google wants to be able to release phones and then have the customer decide which network they want to use their new phone on, not the reverse.

Example : if you were on AT&T, you would pretty much have to use their devices (lets exclude hacked phones for this discussion). This new method is that Google can develop their phone, release it and the customer can pick which network they prefer.

So, instead of being network driven, it'll be product driven. Makes complete sense from the Google point of view, and it could be dangerous for the major networks.

Google can theoretically release a phone and have it on every network one day. This way hardware manufacturers don't have to worry about what network their phone will be exclusive on, it'll be released and everyone can use them.

This is just from what I've read about it. If I'm wrong, someone please jump in and correct me.


-Wil
 

JessiesGirl

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I believe whats happening is the phone will be sold to developers first via Google. Thats why T-Mo is not offering support on it.

I've also said that it's just another ADP device like the G1 was so once T-Mo releases it it won't be called the Nexus, maybe the Passion name will resurface again?

This is all speculation but it's starting to make sense.

Contrary to what I've read on the internet I do not believe Google wants to sell hardware and have to support it. These rumors started with the G1 (the "Google" phone) followed by the My Touch 3G (another "Google" phone) and continue today with yet another "Google" phone the Nexus.

I'm hedging my bet on it being the ADP3

T mobil will now infact support it, this was reported yesterday.

They do not support THE HARDWARE. Not at all. You need to go back to HTC for that.
 

daddyd302

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The real difference is a shift in the way the phone companies work.

What is happening, from what I understand, is Google wants to be able to release phones and then have the customer decide which network they want to use their new phone on, not the reverse.

Example : if you were on AT&T, you would pretty much have to use their devices (lets exclude hacked phones for this discussion). This new method is that Google can develop their phone, release it and the customer can pick which network they prefer.

So, instead of being network driven, it'll be product driven. Makes complete sense from the Google point of view, and it could be dangerous for the major networks.

Google can theoretically release a phone and have it on every network one day. This way hardware manufacturers don't have to worry about what network their phone will be exclusive on, it'll be released and everyone can use them.

This is just from what I've read about it. If I'm wrong, someone please jump in and correct me.


-Wil

Agreed!!! I hope they can hold the prices on the phone and keep it under $300 without a contract. Google will have to find a way to keep the prices down or they're gonna lose alot of money out of this. If they can pull this off, Verizon, and all the other carriers will be forced to stop forcing people onto contracts. This will also put an end into people trying to buy the phone for cheap and break their contract to sell it on ebay.

It would be nice to be able to take the Droid to Sprint, but since it's locked down, that's impossible, Google is trying to put a end to that. Just imagine the power the consumer would have and the plans would have to be cheaper for Verizon in able to keep that customer. I would love to pay less then $99 for everything unlimited.
 
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JessiesGirl

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The real difference is a shift in the way the phone companies work.

What is happening, from what I understand, is Google wants to be able to release phones and then have the customer decide which network they want to use their new phone on, not the reverse.

Example : if you were on AT&T, you would pretty much have to use their devices (lets exclude hacked phones for this discussion). This new method is that Google can develop their phone, release it and the customer can pick which network they prefer.

So, instead of being network driven, it'll be product driven. Makes complete sense from the Google point of view, and it could be dangerous for the major networks.

Google can theoretically release a phone and have it on every network one day. This way hardware manufacturers don't have to worry about what network their phone will be exclusive on, it'll be released and everyone can use them.

This is just from what I've read about it. If I'm wrong, someone please jump in and correct me.


-Wil

Agreed!!! I hope they can hold the prices on the phone and keep it under $300 without a contract. Google will have to find a way to keep the prices down or they're gonna lose alot of money out of this. If they can pull this off, Verizon, and all the other carriers will be forced to stop forcing people onto contracts. This will also put an end into people trying to buy the phone for cheap and break their contract to sell it on ebay.

It would be nice to be able to take the Droid to Sprint, but since it's locked down, that's impossible, Google is trying to put a end to that. Just imagine the power the consumer would have and the plans would have to be cheaper for Verizon in able to keep that customer. I would love to pay less then $99 for everything unlimited.

They appear to be selling it for $530 without a contract, $180 with a TMobile Contract.
 

cb3FSU

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The real difference is a shift in the way the phone companies work.

What is happening, from what I understand, is Google wants to be able to release phones and then have the customer decide which network they want to use their new phone on, not the reverse.

Example : if you were on AT&T, you would pretty much have to use their devices (lets exclude hacked phones for this discussion). This new method is that Google can develop their phone, release it and the customer can pick which network they prefer.

So, instead of being network driven, it'll be product driven. Makes complete sense from the Google point of view, and it could be dangerous for the major networks.

Google can theoretically release a phone and have it on every network one day. This way hardware manufacturers don't have to worry about what network their phone will be exclusive on, it'll be released and everyone can use them.

This is just from what I've read about it. If I'm wrong, someone please jump in and correct me.


-Wil

Yes, but unless the cell providers are going to lower their rates it would be more expensive since you are going to pay for the full cost of the device in addition to the full cost of the plan.

If you sign up for Verizon and buy a crappy phone it costs the same per month as if you buy a cool phone. The service cost does not change based on what type of phone you have.

IMO, Google is going to push their google voice service and have it run through the net so people will only need a data plan, and eliminate the cell carrier altogether.

As it stands, can you not just get the lowest amount of anytime minutes that offers a friends and family plan, a data plan and route all of your calls through the google voice # set up as an in network friend?
 

daddyd302

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The real difference is a shift in the way the phone companies work.

What is happening, from what I understand, is Google wants to be able to release phones and then have the customer decide which network they want to use their new phone on, not the reverse.

Example : if you were on AT&T, you would pretty much have to use their devices (lets exclude hacked phones for this discussion). This new method is that Google can develop their phone, release it and the customer can pick which network they prefer.

So, instead of being network driven, it'll be product driven. Makes complete sense from the Google point of view, and it could be dangerous for the major networks.

Google can theoretically release a phone and have it on every network one day. This way hardware manufacturers don't have to worry about what network their phone will be exclusive on, it'll be released and everyone can use them.

This is just from what I've read about it. If I'm wrong, someone please jump in and correct me.


-Wil

Agreed!!! I hope they can hold the prices on the phone and keep it under $300 without a contract. Google will have to find a way to keep the prices down or they're gonna lose alot of money out of this. If they can pull this off, Verizon, and all the other carriers will be forced to stop forcing people onto contracts. This will also put an end into people trying to buy the phone for cheap and break their contract to sell it on ebay.

It would be nice to be able to take the Droid to Sprint, but since it's locked down, that's impossible, Google is trying to put a end to that. Just imagine the power the consumer would have and the plans would have to be cheaper for Verizon in able to keep that customer. I would love to pay less then $99 for everything unlimited.

They appear to be selling it for $530 without a contract, $180 with a TMobile Contract.


Meh I haven't been paying attention, thanks for the head up. That's not a bad price for a unlock phone. Maybe in a year or two Google can get the price down even more, and get it to work on all networks, well that's my wish, lol.
 
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takeshi

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IMO, Google is going to push their google voice service and have it run through the net so people will only need a data plan, and eliminate the cell carrier altogether.
Two problems with that theory:

1. GV is not VOIP. You still have to have a voice plan or VOIP solution.
2. Where are you going to get a data plan without a carrier? You still have to connect to towers for data and the towers belong to the carriers.
 

Laurence5905

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IMO, Google is going to push their google voice service and have it run through the net so people will only need a data plan, and eliminate the cell carrier altogether.
Two problems with that theory:

1. GV is not VOIP. You still have to have a voice plan or VOIP solution.
2. Where are you going to get a data plan without a carrier? You still have to connect to towers for data and the towers belong to the carriers.

And if, say, GV could be used with no voice-plan, then you can kiss Unlimited Data goodbye -- the money we pay for voice-minutes is definitely subsidizing unlimited data. They're gonna get you one way or the other...
 
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