Nextbit Adds a Verizon Compatible Smartphone to its Kickstarter Lineup

Discussion in 'Android News' started by dgstorm, Sep 18, 2015.

  1. dgstorm

    dgstorm Editor in Chief
    Staff Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2010
    Messages:
    11,016
    Likes Received:
    3,979
    Trophy Points:
    823
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    Ratings:
    +4,254
    [​IMG]

    Not too long ago we shared a story about the new "cloud-first" Android device called the Robin. It's a Kickstarter campaign from a company called Nextbit. One of the primary complaints about the phone was that it was being designed to only support GSM networks in the US. That meant only AT&T and T-Mobile would get it. Of course, there are a ton of Verizon customers who felt left out.

    Luckily, the Nextbit Kickstarter exceeded its funding goals by a lot, because now they announced a new version of the device that will be specifically for Verizon customers. Here's a quote with the details,

    Source: Kickstarter
     
    • Like Like x 1
  2. xDMONEYx

    xDMONEYx Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2010
    Messages:
    309
    Likes Received:
    47
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Erie, PA
    Ratings:
    +62
    Current Phone Model:
    Huawei Nexus 6P
    Twitter:
    bentxnail
    Hmmm, very tempting. I have been wanting a phone with a larger screen than what this has, however I really like the design of this phone, and the fact that it looks to be super developer friendly is another great selling point for me. So many intersting phones coming out at reasonable prices, what is a man to do!?
     
    #2 xDMONEYx, Sep 18, 2015
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2015
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. Mustang02

    Mustang02 Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2010
    Messages:
    7,625
    Likes Received:
    5,115
    Trophy Points:
    1,563
    Location:
    Ohio
    Ratings:
    +6,073
    Current Phone Model:
    Nexus 6P/5X
    buy them all.
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Winner Winner x 1
  4. tech_head

    tech_head Silver Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2010
    Messages:
    651
    Likes Received:
    199
    Trophy Points:
    143
    Location:
    Western Hemisphere
    Ratings:
    +280
    I'd be all over it with a microSD but that breaks their paradigm. I think the whole thing is flawed with tiered plans.
    If unlimited were the norm then it might make sense, but you will be charged to get access to your data. I keep my music on my phone.
     
  5. FoxKat

    FoxKat Premium Member
    Premium Member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2010
    Messages:
    14,806
    Likes Received:
    4,751
    Trophy Points:
    838
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Ratings:
    +5,290
    Current Phone Model:
    Droid Turbo 2 & Galaxy S7
    But that's the whole idea about moving away from unlimited and into tiered pricing for data. I've said it before, but in case anyone missed it, there are only so many minutes in a day/month that you can be on a phone call, so unlimited calling isn't really unlimited, in the sense that if you were on a phone call for the entire 24 hours each day for 30 days, you've reached the limit of how many minutes you can be on a phone call.

    In contrast, unlimited data is truly unlimited, since there is essentially no limit as to how much data you can pull down in a month, except perhaps only limited by the speed of the connection, and if you're saving that data, what possible storage capacity you may have. Of course if you're streaming, such as watching movies back to back the only limit is the size of the movies and how many you can stand to watch in a row. Tethering just makes this even more potential room for abuse.

    So in a nutshell, devices will get faster, throughput will get faster, pipelines will get wider, data size in files will be growing (think 4K video), and consumption of data JUST HAS to increase over time. Consumption of phone call time will likely not increase by any significant amount, and if anything is becoming less and less with texting and social networking taking away the good old voice to voice communication.

    So if you want to charge for something and be profitable, you charge for the consumable that gets the highest rate of consumption, in this case...data.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  6. tech_head

    tech_head Silver Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2010
    Messages:
    651
    Likes Received:
    199
    Trophy Points:
    143
    Location:
    Western Hemisphere
    Ratings:
    +280
    Hi,

    I already know tha the goal is to make you pay for what is in demand.
    Texting was initially free way back when. It costs them nothing because it's in the idle portion of the channel.
    They found that it was popular and made it a pay service.
    Data was initially unlimited until lots of phones had data ability. Now they charge for the water in the pipe.
    We get charged more than any other modern nation.
    Our prices are going up where the rest of the world sees the prices in a downward trend.

    The device manufacturers are playing into the hands of the carriers because they want small storage so they can sell you access to your data. I'm not buying.
    I plan to buy a new phone in a few months. Moto X Pure with extra 128GB card or iPhone 6s Plus with 128GB.
    I have unlimited but I like my music and data on my device and not in the cloud. I do stream though.
    I use about 12-15GB per month.
     
  7. RyanPm40

    RyanPm40 Active Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2010
    Messages:
    884
    Likes Received:
    93
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Ratings:
    +131
    When was texting free?? I've been texting for 11 years and it's never been free for me haha maybe I'm still just a liiiitttle too young?
     
  8. tech_head

    tech_head Silver Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2010
    Messages:
    651
    Likes Received:
    199
    Trophy Points:
    143
    Location:
    Western Hemisphere
    Ratings:
    +280
    Read my signature:
    "I have forgotten more about technology, than most people will ever know in their lifetime."

    I've had a mobile/cell phone for more than 20 years if that helps.