NVIDIA Demos 'Direct-Stylus' Feature of Tegra 4 Reference Tablet

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NVIDIA's at it again, hard charging with innovative new ideas. Today they demonstrated an intriguing new feature that one of their Tegra 4 equipped reference tablets is capable of. It's called "Direct Stylus" and it is basically a digital means of drawing/writing with pencil-like properties on a tablet. Here's a quote with the details,

As Computex’s doors swing open today, NVIDIA is demonstrating a new technology for Tegra 4-based tablets that lets a fine-tip passive stylus be used to draw lines of different width simply by varying the pressure applied by the user.

The result is the first low-cost screen stylus that replicates the natural ease of writing – and erasing – directly on paper.

NVIDIA DirectStylus technology applies the image-processing power of Tegra 4’s GPU to analyze data from a standard touch sensor and recognize the difference between fine-tip stylus, finger, eraser and palm.

The result: Users can write on the screen using a simple passive pen and its opposite end can be used like an eraser, whose unique touch pattern can be differentiated from drawing strokes.

While passive styluses are available on the market, they generally have fat, 5mm tips that draw only one line width without the user selecting different stroke widths from a menu. These are of limited use, especially in Asian markets, where drawing characters requires line strokes of continually varying width.

Active 1.5mm styluses on the market that are capable of making strokes of varying width typically require a dedicated digitizer and cost at least $20. In contrast, the DirectStylus solution is an inexpensive passive conductive stylus.

DirectStylus works in conjunction with Direct Touch 2.0 technology which supports up to 300 scans a second (five times the typical 60Hz touch scan rate) to capture more detailed movement of the stylus for smooth ink and fine tip movement.

What do you guys think? Do we have any traditional artists out there intrigued by the possibility if having a "paper and pencil-like" experience on a tablet?

Source: NVIDIA
 
Though not an artist if probably really appreciate it for it's similarity with pencil/pen style uses.
I use a slider keyboard because it helps my limited brain capacity relate to writing things much better. If handwriting options on keyboards were better I'd make more use of them vs sliding. That and having a finger that covers 1/4 of the keyboard with each tap.
As it is I really enjoy using a felt tipped type of stylus on my tablets, though they aren't as accurate at fine tuning on editing photos with Picsay as an example but are fine for slide writing.

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If I can write on the screen with its stylus and it doesn't pick up my palm resting on the screen or the occasional touch of a finger tip as I write with the stylus, that will be awesome.
 
Though not an artist if probably really appreciate it for it's similarity with pencil/pen style uses.
I use a slider keyboard because it helps my limited brain capacity relate to writing things much better. If handwriting options on keyboards were better I'd make more use of them vs sliding. That and having a finger that covers 1/4 of the keyboard with each tap.
As it is I really enjoy using a felt tipped type of stylus on my tablets, though they aren't as accurate at fine tuning on editing photos with Picsay as an example but are fine for slide writing.

Support Our Troops! !!!
<><
From a Beano

I use the handwriting feature on my note 2 from time to time... it's not perfect but it sure does work well.. especially using the Jelly Beans rom and the S-Pen switcher so it automatically changes my keyboard
 
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