Extended Battery + Standard Battery Calibration

Discussion in 'Samsung Galaxy Nexus' started by solidspidey, Dec 20, 2011.

  1. solidspidey

    solidspidey New Member

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    I just got my precious yesterday :biggrin: and am currently using the standard battery. This isnt a "bad battery life" thread, I want to let the battery cycle a few times before coming up with a conclusion on battery life.

    Anyways my question is, in the future if I plan on going back and forth between an extended battery and standard battery how do I configure both batteries so ICS knows the min/max capacity for both? Do I even need to? Also, I have battery monitor widget installed and there you can create profiles for multiple batteries but I dont think that affects how the ICS views the battery capacities.

    Any insight would be greatly appreciated!!!!
     
  2. MNTNBKR

    MNTNBKR Member

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    I don't think that ICS (or any operating system for that matter) "knows" or "learns" a battery that is inserted into a device (see disclaimer). Instead, the battery status (charge percentage) is calculated as a function of battery max and min voltage, with LiPo batteries typically having a max voltage of about 4.2V and a (safe) minimum voltage of about 3.0V (per cell). These are pre-defined values that are driven by the battery technology itself, and do not differ substantially from one battery to the next. So, our phones are designed to charge a battery until it reaches 4.2v and discharge until it reaches 3.0V. An extended battery simply takes longer to go from max voltage to min voltage. When a LiPo is "dead" it's not actually dead, it has just reached the low voltage cutoff of 3.00V and the phone shuts off. Theoretically you could run your phone for some time longer on that battery, however, you risk damaging the battery, so manufacturers put a fail-safe low voltage cutoff in the phone.

    Bit of useless knowledge: When I run my R/C car and Heli, the low voltage cutoff is set at 3.3V per cell so as to ensure sufficient battery power to return the model to a "safe zone" without discharging the battery beyond it's safe low voltage limit. The signal is a loud chirping sound and reduced RPM's on the motors.

    Disclaimer: I don't know this as fact, rather I'm basing this statement on my knowledge of LiPo batteries as used in R/C applications. There may be some slight advantage in more accurately determining remaining battery life if the OS "knows" the battery (but I kinda doubt it).
     
  3. solidspidey

    solidspidey New Member

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    wow thank you MNTNBKR that is very insightful information. It makes alot of sense.

    Maybe someone else can chime in and verify this information?
     
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