Wi-Fi?

Discussion in 'Android General Discussions' started by Skizz135, Dec 11, 2009.

  1. Skizz135
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    Skizz135 New Member

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    Hey all,

    May sound like a pretty dumb question but could someone tell me the benefits of Wi-Fi? Does it just result in a faster connection than the standard 3G connection? Thanks
  2. garrett
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    garrett New Member Theme Developer Developer

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    in short YES....

    but it also lets messages and emails come through while you are on the phone.


    you can also browse the internet and send messages while on the phone too.
  3. takeshi
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    takeshi New Member

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    Well, that and all the benefits that come along with a faster connection.
  4. gdoane
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    gdoane New Member

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    Without Wi-Fi, Speedtest.Net is showing 1109 MBPS download speed on Droid.

    With my Wi-Fi, Speedtest.Net is showing 8273 MBPS download speed.

    I'd call that a significant difference.
  5. bergdev
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    bergdev New Member

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    Having an additional (and typically much faster) connection to the Internet is always good, especially if the cell signal is weak, such as in the basement of a metal building, etc.
  6. gdoane
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    gdoane New Member

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    A benefit most users wouldn't think about is the decreased loading on system demand.

    I read a couple of articles that laid out the data consumption problem in pretty stark terms concerning smart phones.

    A smart phone consumes about eight times more data than a standard cell phone user, yet doesn't cost anywhere near eight times as much. What this means is the system is strained and AT&T is already saying that it needs iPhone users to cut back on system use because their system can't take it.

    I know Verizon's system is far superior (There's a map for that) but the basic problem remains the same, especially in highly populated areas where a lot of smart phones are demanding data feeds in the same place at the same time on the same network.

    That means the advantage to you as a customer is phones that are in their home domain running Wi-Fi aren't sucking megabytes away from phones that are actually being mobile.

    I just got my first bill with the Droid coming from the Moto Q the month before and the difference was 90 Megabytes less airtime data use with the Droid, nearly a 10% reduction and that helps make the network stronger, faster and better for everyone on it.

    I sure as heck ain't using less data, but with the Droid going off the grid (so to speak) and preferring my Wi-Fi at home for data eating it reduces strain on the network and makes the network better.

    My old Moto Q didn't even know what Wi-Fi was so my consumption was higher on the network and I had a bigger cyber footprint on the airwaves with an inferior phone.

    I think that's part of why Verizon is pushing the Droid so hard. If it takes strain off of their network (it does according to my bill) then that's less money they have to spend on infrastructure and more money on the bottom line. It's actually an economy feature for them because if my Droid is on my Cox Cable Wi-Fi, they don't have to worry about the bandwidth. It's a smart business model.