White Light of Death?

Discussion in 'Smartphone Battery Discussion' started by Celes, Feb 13, 2012.

  1. Celes

    Celes New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2012
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Ratings:
    +0
    My Razr Maxx died. When I plugged it in I didn't get the usual run through of the start up screens or the battery charging indicator showing me it was at 0%. Instead the battery light is now lite up white. Usually I only have to wait about 5 mins or so to turn the phone back on. I have had it on the charger for over an hour and theres is no difference. There is no battery indication of charge and the white light is still on. My phone will not turn on. Anyone know anything about this? Thanks
     
  2. thaDroidz

    thaDroidz Silver Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2010
    Messages:
    2,058
    Likes Received:
    42
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    neptune
    Ratings:
    +42
    I have no ideas, but definitely want to watch for an answer...


    Is it possible to do to "power/ volume up" reset to do any good?

    ----posted maxx'ed out----
     
  3. mikeyk61

    mikeyk61 New Member

    Joined:
    May 16, 2011
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Ratings:
    +0
    Possible Solution

    I had the same issue. White light, tried different outlets, jiggled the cord and nothing for 12 hours. I then tried different plug in my car and almost instantly up to 5% charge. Now fully working on plugs at work,so you can try this. It may work....

     
  4. BroidDrionic

    BroidDrionic Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2012
    Messages:
    541
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +5
    This happened with my bionic one time. As has been said, I tried popping it in my car dock and it instantly booted. Wall chargers and USB ports just weren't cutting it I guess.

    Sent from my DROID BIONIC using DroidForums
     
  5. mikeyk61

    mikeyk61 New Member

    Joined:
    May 16, 2011
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Ratings:
    +0
    My wall chargers work great (and the car charger)! They (wall chargers) provide the most current, I believe. The one I had at home, that wont charge and causes white light, will be thrown away. I think it is old and possibly broke inside.
     
  6. FoxKat

    FoxKat DF Super Moderator Staff Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2010
    Messages:
    13,476
    Likes Received:
    3,883
    Trophy Points:
    738
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Ratings:
    +4,285
    Current Phone Model:
    Droid Turbo, and Nexus 6!
    There are several threads here and many more on other forums about phones that were allowed to "die", or in other words, drained to 0% and shut down on their own. There is considerable risk in doing this. Once the phone's battery reaches 0% (about 3V), it's not very far from being unable to accept a charge at all.

    From Batteryuniversity.com (Battery Fuel Gauge: Factual or Fallacy? - Battery University

    Over-discharging Lithium-ion


    • [*=1] Li-ion should never be discharged too low, and there are several safeguards to prevent this from happening. The equipment cuts off when the battery discharges to about 3.0V/cell, stopping the current flow. << This is what I mean by allowing it to "die"

      If the discharge continues to about 2.70V/cell or lower, the battery’s protection circuit puts the battery into a sleep mode. This renders the pack unserviceable and a recharge with most chargers is not possible. << And THIS is what I mean about risking the battery being unable to accept a charge at all. These batteries CAN in most cases be BOOSTED back into charging mode with a high-voltage charge for up to 1 minute and will continue to function normally from there on, but this is something that normally requires specialized equipment and must be done carefully since the risk of failure is great.

      To prevent a battery from falling asleep, apply a partial charge before a long storage period.[*=1]Do not recharge lithium-ion if a cell has stayed at or below 1.5V for more than a week. Copper shunts may have formed inside the cells that can lead to a partial or total electrical short. If recharged, the cells might become unstable, causing excessive heat or showing other anomalies. Li-ion packs that have been under stress are more sensitive to mechanical abuse, such as vibration, dropping and exposure to heat.

    There have been many examples of people who couldn't get their phones to either begin charging or even boot up once they've shut themselves down at 0%. In some cases it took overnight before the phone became responsive, others like those mentioned here in this thread were able to jump-start them with the car adapters (which put out higher current). This ISN'T the "protection mode" described above, but instead a voltage level that is just too low and current requirement too high to support the phone's display and charging circuit while also providing the battery enough charging to allow it to rise above the rate of consumption by the phone's start-up draw. This is why in those cases, a higher current charger was able to get it back out of its stalled state.

    In the diagram below you'll notice in the "stage 1" charging (far left), the battery is able to accept and will pull 1 Amp of current (dotted line) when the voltage is very low - under 3V (solid line), and yet the phone requires a minimum of just over 3V to wake up (whether into Charge only mode or full booting). If the current is insufficient to allow the voltage to rise to 3V or better, and in the mean time the phone's motherboard is trying to get 3V+ and pulling current in the process, the battery can't catch up and so the voltage remains below the 3V+ threshold, the phone doesn't wake, and the battery stalls in the charging state at under 3V.

    Also the stock charger only supplies 750mAh, or 7/10 of an Amp at 5.1V, then the charging circuitry on the phone takes the 5.1V at 750mA and down-converts it to 4.2V at is able to supply about 800mAh or so. This means it's even more difficult for a deeply discharged battery to compete with the motherboard for power.

    View attachment 48196


    Conclusion...DON'T allow the phone to "die" at 0% on its own, charge as soon as possible after the phone indicates "Low battery", which is at 15%. If the battery does discharge fully by accident, charge as soon as possible so that the voltage doesn't continue to drop due to normal discharging and potentially put you into one of the undesirable situations mentioned above.

    Charge often, don't worry about charging fully, the battery actually prefers shorter partial charges and it will last longer over time for it.
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2012
  7. Dianaa

    Dianaa New Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2012
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Ratings:
    +0
    I have the same problem with the white light and am clueless also
     
  8. altjx

    altjx Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2009
    Messages:
    630
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +3
    FoxKat, thank you very much for this information. I've always heard that it should be "drained" at least once a month to maintain maximum battery life, but I've always assumed this meant let the phone cut off itself. Thankfully, last night I put it on the charger with it was a little less than 15%.
     
  9. FoxKat

    FoxKat DF Super Moderator Staff Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2010
    Messages:
    13,476
    Likes Received:
    3,883
    Trophy Points:
    738
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Ratings:
    +4,285
    Current Phone Model:
    Droid Turbo, and Nexus 6!
    The method of draining the battery on an infrequent basis was a spill-over from the Nickel Cadmium battery days (more than a decade ago), and to a lesser-extent Nickel Metal Hydride. Those batteries had a characteristic whereby if you used it for only a portion of its full charge on a regular basis, eventually the battery would "assume" that amount of charge consumed as its full capacity.

    For instance, let's say you used an average of 60% of the battery's capacity, so you charge to 100% overnight, then use to 40%, then repeat, and you do that for several months. What would happen is the battery's internal chemistry would essentially build up crystals (Dendrites) that occupied the space originally occupied by the Cadmium paste which allowed charge to happen, essentially blocking that portion of the battery's physical space from being active and able to maintain a charge. So eventually even if it was fully charged, it would start dying at 40%, rather than continuing to provide power to 0% as expected. By repeated deep-discharges followed by repeated full charges, the battery would reclaim some of that space by breaking down the Dendrites. This worked - somewhat.

    Eventually, there was a system developed by Cadex (the parent of BatteryUniversity.com), which would "zap" the batteries with a series of quick high voltage jolts that helped to break up those dendrites and reclaim more of the battery's charge capacity (see Battery charger and battery analyzer experts - Cadex Electronics Inc.). I still have the one I purchased back in the 90s, and used to keep my Motorola Flip Phone batteries going strong. By using this technique, they could reclaim upwards of 90% or more of the original capacity and revive batteries that would have otherwise been thrown away and replaced. The savings for fleet management (such as Police, Fire, Ambulance, Security, etc.) was tremendous. The term coined by Cadex was "Battery Conditioning". This has led to the same terms and deep discharging techniques being incorrectly applied to "other" battery chemistry. This is totally effective ONLY with Nickel Cadmium batteries and should NOT be applied to ANY other battery chemistry.

    Today there are "Universal Battery Conditioners and Chargers" which are intelligent and can detect the type of battery being tested and charged, and will change the charging algorithm to fit the particular battery chemistry. Since some batteries (namely Lithium based batteries) can't be continually charged or they will rupture violently, these universal chargers are equipped to shut off charging when the battery has reached its optimum charge, then monitor it to assure full charge and "top off" as necessary while on stand-by. For us, our phones have a similar version of the same smart battery charging technology built it, so as long as you use the phone and the original charger supplied by Motorola, you'll never have to fear a problem.
     
  10. altjx

    altjx Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2009
    Messages:
    630
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +3
    Does this mean that there's no harm in charging and unplugging throughout the day that can/will potentially negatively affect the battery life?
     
  11. Trash Can

    Trash Can Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2010
    Messages:
    339
    Likes Received:
    25
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Las Vegas, NV
    Ratings:
    +25
    Small charges of short duration throughout the day are good. There's evidence that this practice will prolong battery life.
     
  12. FoxKat

    FoxKat DF Super Moderator Staff Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2010
    Messages:
    13,476
    Likes Received:
    3,883
    Trophy Points:
    738
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Ratings:
    +4,285
    Current Phone Model:
    Droid Turbo, and Nexus 6!
    Trash Can is 100% correct. For example, it is better to charge from 20% to 60% and then again from 20% to 60%, rather than from 20% to 100%. Shorter charges, on average from 25% to 75% of capacity will extend the battery's total life from 500 100% charges to as much as either 1,000 75% charges or 1,500 50% charges (each yielding 750 100% charges) or to 2,500 25% charges (yielding 625 100% charges).

    Based on those numbers, it looks like the "sweet spot" is somewhere near or between 50% and 75% per charge. This falls right in line with the manufacturer's recommendation that you place the phone on charge as soon as the "Low battery" warning signals at 15%, and that the phone will maintain a full charge at somewhere between 90% and 100% of rated capacity (15% reserve plus 10% cushion = 25% variance against capacity, leaving 75% charge in the cycle).
     
Search tags for this page

droid razr maxx white light

,

droid razr maxx white light of death

,

droid razr white light

,
droid razr white light of death
,

droid razr white notification light

,

droid razr won't turn on white light

,
droid razr wont turn on white light
,
motorola razr maxx white light
,
motorola razr white light
,
razr maxx white light