What does Google's Acquisition of Motorola Mobility mean for the future of Droid?

Discussion in 'Motorola Droid 3' started by technogeek00, Aug 15, 2011.

  1. CLShade

    CLShade Member

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2010
    Messages:
    69
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Location:
    Hawaii
    Ratings:
    +0
    We'll see how it actually shakes out. Google says they aren't going to change how Moto runs but I don't think they're going to be able to resist doing so forever. We've also seen that what Google says or implies its going to do concerning Android doesn't always end up being what happens.

    I'm guessing that Moto devices will get faster/better updates simply for the fact that they'll have more access to expertise. This won't make Moto more competitive than the others, it'll just bring it up to snuff. Remember that Moto Mobile has been losing money for a while. The D1 was a welcome shot in the arm but that was their last really solid hit. (Which, ahem, should be a substantial vote in favor of unlocked bootloaders. Having an open source, free community of devs that extends the life - and value - of your devices is ~not~ a bad thing.)

    I don't think Moto's competitors will really need to worry about Google propping up Moto for a while. I do think a Google owned Moto Mobile ~will~ eventually become an big swinging...uh, thing... in the Android world but I'm not sure that's going to be a big detriment to the other Android OEM's. In fact, if Google can get equal footing with Apple and Microsoft then the other OEM's stand to benefit from Android's increased stability in the market.

    It probably also helps them ~ a lot ~ that Apple and Microsoft could then sue Google directly instead of using the smaller companies (with much smaller pockets) as proxy battlefields.

    I do hope it increases support for droids, though. Switching recently to the as yet unrooted D3 (from a blessedly open D1) has reminded my how much responsibility OEM's have over our user experience. I wish they'd quit that.

    Want to make a device that I want to buy and use? Then make it so I can set it up however I d@mn well please. If that becomes standard... then the OEM's can focus on outdoing each other with hardware improvements. Wouldn't that be novel?
     
  2. technogeek00

    technogeek00 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2011
    Messages:
    59
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Ratings:
    +0
    Id say +1 to the entirety of that statement.
    If nothing else i think we can all say it would be extremely hard for this deal to turn out to be a negative thing for the android ecosystem or the motorola droid line.

    Sent from my Transformer TF101 using DroidForums
     
  3. Fr33dom

    Fr33dom Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2011
    Messages:
    547
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +6
    Problem is that the OEM is always going to respond to what the service provider wants. And they want to control your access to their services so that they can charge you too much to use those services.
     
  4. aramos87

    aramos87 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2011
    Messages:
    108
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Ratings:
    +0
    With Google owning Moto Mobility dont they have the final say on what is on their devices though? Couldnt this mean unlocked bootloaders, less bloat for everyone (Moto users)? I for one think that this is good news.
     
  5. spunker88

    spunker88 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2011
    Messages:
    62
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Ratings:
    +1
    Verizon has the final say I'm afraid. They need to approve of the device before they start selling it. I just hope Google will try to force carriers to cut back the bloat or at least make it uninstallable. I think a decent compromise would be to include the bloat, make it uninstallable, but have it return upon factory reset similar to how computers with OEM recovery partitions work. Smartphones are going the way of OEM computers. I remember in the 90s when they came OEM with a mostly clean installation of Windows. Nowadays OEMs pack them full of bloatware just like phones, but at least on computers you can remove it all. People who aren't going to use the Verizon crap are going to uninstall it if allowed and those few people that actually want it will have it. What does Verizon have to lose here?
     
  6. aramos87

    aramos87 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2011
    Messages:
    108
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Ratings:
    +0
    yeah I agree with that, there are 2 apps that I do use that were pre-installed which is DLNA and zumocast (which needs some work), but as far as the VZW apps go I wish I could uninstall them... every single one of them!! haha

    Lets just hope that the chagnes that come along are for the better and make Moto Droid a force to be reckoned with!
     
  7. imnotmikal

    imnotmikal Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2011
    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Location:
    Richmond, VA
    Ratings:
    +0
    "Droid" is actually trademarked by LucasFilms, not Moto. Verizon pays LucasFilms to use the Droid trademark for marketing and what not.
    HTC DROID Incredicble
    Samsung DROID Charge
    Neither of those are Moto...
     
  8. CLShade

    CLShade Member

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2010
    Messages:
    69
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Location:
    Hawaii
    Ratings:
    +0
    Ah, yeah, I can understand why a carrier would want a locked device. And why they'd have such sway over the OEMs to force locked devices. Rooting isn't risk free and the carriers don't want to shoulder that risk.

    It is a rather complex set of factors, isn't it?

    Makes me wish there was an option to buy an unlocked (both carrier unlocked and unlocked bootloader) and still get the carrier subsidy with a 2 year plan commitment... say with a penalty of paying a prorated full price for the device if you cancel the plan early. Same net effect for the carrier without the gynastics of having to lock the device.

    I suppose us "does it have root, yet!?" types are a tiny minority in the market, though.
     
Search tags for this page

future of

,

how does googles.purchase.of.motorola mobility change.the op

,

verizonsupportfordroids