The "New" New Phone Rumor Mill

Discussion in 'Tech News' started by Trusstopher, Sep 14, 2011.

  1. MissionImprobable

    MissionImprobable Silver Member

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    I will certainly agree that it's ridiculous in the first place to have to root to be able to freeze or uninstall bloatware, and even more so to have to return your phone to stock before you try and take it in for a warranty claim when those simple changes are not the cause of the issue that are causing the phone to be returned. The interesting thing is that Verizon is actually in the wrong on it, the same way as car dealerships were proven in court to be in the wrong when denying warranty repairs on modified cars. Unless the company can reasonably prove that the issues you are experiencing or any damage caused is the direct result of modifications you made you cannot have your claim denied.

    That said, this has been common practice for a while now. There were programs on my LG V that could not be removed, there are apps on the iPhone that cannot be removed, and there will likely continue to be apps on Android OS that cannot be removed without rooting. Again, my issue is in attempts to say that warranties are voided simply by rooting, and though I hope it doesn't end up as a court case, Verizon is by all appearances in the wrong as there is nothing in the contract that says you agree not to modify the phone, nor could the contractually obligate you to agree to that at still have any sales to speak of.
     
  2. akhi216

    akhi216 Member

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    Not if you return it to stock.

    Sent from my DROID3 using DroidForums
     
  3. ilikemoneygreen

    ilikemoneygreen Silver Member

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    I dont think you get what im saying. I realize that our intelligent community has ways around stuff. Im not taking anything away from the dev community. The dev community is NOT moto. It is a reasonable expectation to say that i shouldn't have to depend on third party software tweaks to get rid of something that is forcefully opted in and its a ridiculous to say that i should have to resort to a TECHNICAL violation of my warranty in order to remove a program that clearly has nothing to do with the function of my phone. The apps have nothing to do with the operating system, they are clearly third party apps, and the only way to remove these third party apps is to violate my warranty. While their are ways to slide out of getting my warranty back on my D1, i can say the violation of the warranty occurs when you root it. Just because you return it to stock they have no way of knowing if you rooted it before doesn't mean you didn't violate your warranty terms.
    I am sorry about the text you quoted btw, that was an incomplete thought. I was writing it in class and my prof. saw me writing it up and started yelling at me, while she was yelling i was typing blindly and trying to hurry up but then she snatched it out of my hand and it sent somehow. Haha, good times. I got my phone back now luckily. Who cares about philosophy anyway? :D
     
  4. sweeeeet

    sweeeeet Silver Member

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    droid 4 is pretty nice looking for a QWERTY phone

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  5. MissionImprobable

    MissionImprobable Silver Member

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    Motorola DROID 4 leaked in Beta build photos - SlashGear

    It says non-removable battery here, but it looks like the cover is similar to the Droid 3 and may be able to be exchanged for a larger back with an extended battery. Otherwise this may be a no-go for me; I just don't foresee the stock battery being enough, but I guess time will tell.
     
  6. akhi216

    akhi216 Member

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    I understand perfectly what you saying.

    Well the term bloatware/crapware gets paraded around as if it's a standard. What what you may consider crapware, I don't and vice versa. I once read an American guy say that the NFL Mobile app was bloatware and I blew up at him ( how the hell can you be American and not like football???) Manufacturers/carriers target a specific crowd of people when they put apps on a phone. To expect them to please everyone with those apps is ridiculous. Google understood this, and made Android a platform that is pretty much open to hacking and installing custom ROMs that don't have bloatware on them or removing/freezing the bloatware.

    The thing is you if you want pure Android, you have to get a Nexus or other developer device (e.g. OG Droid, Xoom, etc.). Many consider Google Books and other Google Apps to be bloatware but you'd better believe that Google is gonna have them on the Nexus, and their attitude about it is if a person doesn't don't like it then they can root it and get rid of it OR...not buy the phone. If a person doesn't feel that the Nexus is bloatware-free and that enrages them and they feel a conviction about rooting the phone because of warranty implications, then perhaps they shouldn't be in the market for smartphones. And the same is the case for non-Nexus phones. And if a person feels that there's nothing wrong with stock Android and all Google apps are necessary, wouldn't that make them no better than iSheep?...

    With Android there are options.

    Hey it isn't like they're gonna make a phone with a Clean Slate with nothing but Android Market. They're not gonna use psychic powers to determine what a single individual wants preloaded on their phone and market it to the masses, and if they did have psychic power that allowed them to know what the minds of millions of people wanted on their phone they couldn't add everything thus they couldn't please everybody.






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    #678 akhi216, Oct 27, 2011
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2011
  7. Trusstopher

    Trusstopher Super Moderator
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    But they would please a ton more people if they just gave us the ability to uninstall the apps after we buy the phone without having to do any extra steps besides clicking "uninstall."

    I agree with most of your points, but you miss the major kicker, which is "Why can't we have the ability to uninstall them like any other app?" What is the purpose of locking apps that people don't want into the device that are definitely not vital to the operation of the phone?
     
  8. lemodular

    lemodular Member

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    ...Because it's the bloat that keeps the prices of the equipment down. They are obligated to to lock them. Although having a time limited lock is a better idea.
     
  9. metalspring

    metalspring Silver Member

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    I don't know about the Google apps but the ones the carriers put on have a very simple reason for being there (at least I'm pretty sure of this)- they get paid to put them there...for example putting an NFL mobile app is because the NFL probably pays them some amount of money because its basically advertising. It works like this
    "oh what's this app? I don't plan on using it so I'll uninstall it. Oh wait I can't, I might as well use it even if I have to pay a small subscription fee. Afterall its on here to stay so I might as well."
    Its a case of if you can't get rid of it, you might as well at least try using after awhile of being sick of seeing it take up space uselessly

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  10. akhi216

    akhi216 Member

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    Agreed.

    Point taken.

    I can only speculate that they feel that that a degree of control over the phone is professional and makes them stand out among the rest; probably taking a cue from the iPhone which has been extremely successful despite doing these things, thereby making it a "proven" marketing strategy.





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  11. akhi216

    akhi216 Member

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    That makes a lot of sense until I see things like this:

    http://www.mobileburn.com/chtml/mob...x-official-5gb-of-free-storage-for-htc-owners

    ...then I can't help wonder who's paying who.

    Perhaps it goes both ways.
     
  12. MissionImprobable

    MissionImprobable Silver Member

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    It's again not even a matter of what comes on the phone, it's a matter of them voiding warranties when people remove it. As I said though, just as dealerships lost when trying to deny warranties on modified cars simply because they were modified, and just because Apple tried to declare jailbreaking illegal did not make either correct, nor is Verizon correct in stating that rooting and removing apps is grounds for voiding warranties.