Tethering - Here's why I wouldn't do it...

Discussion in 'General Discussions' started by JFDroid, Apr 24, 2010.

  1. jsh1120

    jsh1120 Silver Member

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    I can only conclude you have very little experience with the legal system if you believe "a contract is just a piece of paper." On the other hand, when this issue has come up in the past on this board I've noted that Verizon would be crazy to try to track down the occasional "tetherer" even if they could.

    In the first place, as already noted, they don't have to "prove" that you are tethering your Droid; they only need to decide (not prove) that you are materially affecting other users. And downloading massive amounts of data fits that criterion nicely.

    In the second place, VZW isn't concerned with tethering per se. They're concerned with demand on their 3G network that tethering may encourage. To that end, it's far more cost effective simply to examine the amount of data traffic on their 3G network than to examine how that traffic is triggered.

    If, in fact, VZW has begun to look more closely at the issue of "tethering," they will simply look at accounts where large volumes of data are being consumed. The first step undoubtedly would be to remind a user of their contract provisions. The second would be to place additional charges on the monthly bill. The third would be termination of service and a black mark on the customer's credit. Problem solved from VZW's point of view.
     
  2. astevens54

    astevens54 Member

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    You should be fine doing that. I connect with my netbook occasionally and have had no problems or complaints. This has been debated to death. If abused, you will probably be caught and or warned to stop. As posted in another posting on this, I would challenge anyone terminated to post the notice of termination and circumstances.
     
  3. christim

    christim Super Moderator
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    It may or may not be the future. The majority of people do not use proxies and they also tend to be slow enough that the purpose you want to use them for won't work out so good. Besides, who is going to put up the server farm so legions of folks can get "free" internet through their cell phones instead of using cable? Good chance you'd end up paying for such a service until someone shut the servers down.

    Your contact does not allow you to use Netflix on your computer accessed through your phone and Verizon's cell towers. If you watched 20 high quality movies, in a month, in this fashion, how much bandwidth do you think you just sucked down, that came from Netflix, that your phone can't use?

    I'm not saying such restrictions and repercussions are imminent. It definitely is possible. There is a chance we will read about someone getting smacked with a multi-thousand dollar bill at some point, just like you read about such huge bills happening to normal cell phone users who exceed their limits.

    If you tether for emergencies and not for recreation I'd think that event occurring to you would be unlikely.

    btw...would a $22,000 cellphone bill be reasonable in your opinion?
    Sure, the bill got credited but the abuse also got stopped. After Dad changed his shorts.

    Even a $4700 bill would freak most of us out. You have to get on the call, wait on hold, sort it out. Maybe they fix it the first call, maybe they let you sweat it out 3 months. Who knows.

    At least this phone company dropped this $85k bill down to $5k

    These bills are not the norm, but they do make the rest of us want to avoid a similar situation!

    Btw, thanks for the link to the terms and conditions!
     
  4. christim

    christim Super Moderator
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    Just thought of a situation that would be easy to monitor as far as traffic. Sure, you've encrypted all your netflix, hulu, and xbox traffic.

    What about that malware program that phones home to some Russia server every hour that you got infected with last week? My son works at his college's helpdesk and just told me yesterday about 1900 different items that came up when running a malwarebytes.org on a single pc. Tether that PC and all sorts of traffic will start going out through the cell towers. If spam mail accounts for half of all internet traffic and everyone tethers their pc through their phone it sure can't help Verizon's network.

    These are reasons why they may take action. At some point they probably will have to take action. Of course the easiest thing to do is just impose a cap on all new contracts and do away with the unlimited offering. Then it won't matter if your PC uses up your allotted bandwidth or your phone does.
     
  5. Aluminum21

    Aluminum21 Member

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    Sorry for the dumb question, but what is tethering?
     
  6. INSANENEIVIESIS

    INSANENEIVIESIS Active Member
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    [​IMG] anyone have any butter?
     
  7. LtKen

    LtKen Silver Member

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    I just grabbed myself a Coke and a bag of Skittles. Watching people argue over misinformation is kind of fun...

    Not that I'm saying all of this is misinformation, but so much of it is. Between the 5gb limits for data on the phone, termination of contract for rooting, and the idea that the cable company can magically override NAT and my router security to see which of my two PS3s is causing network traffic.

    This thread should probably be closed.
     
  8. pc747

    pc747 Regular Member
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    Lets keep it simple. We all know that tethering isnt allowed; we do not go into verizon telling everybody and the rep that "my droid can tether for free".
    I asked about the palm pre plus and I was told it was a one time promotion to get people to buy; that new palm customers will have to pay to tether.
    I just feel it is ridiculous to have to pay an extra 30 bucks a month to go to the same sites that I can go on my phone. So I am basically being gouged just so I can view sites on a bigger screen. I think that is ridiculous.
    With that said, like so many have noted, if they wanted to go after tethering they would not have the time to look at every vzw user. They would go after those with crazy usage.
    What all this mean to me: Simple if I tether, which I do with my netbook, I go to sites that I can pull up on my droid, I do not use it everyday or as my sole source of internet, and I do not use it to download movies. Besides even though the 3g net is pretty fast, I would rather download the movie through my cable modem since it is faster.
    I look at it like this: we all know speeding is illegal and if a cop catch you going one mile over the speed limit he can write you a ticket. If you are driving with the flow of traffic going about five over the speed limit (unless you are in a school zone) a cop is not going to stop you. If you are blowing by the pack and it is clear you are doing at least 15 to 20 over he is going to pop you.
     
  9. noorigin

    noorigin New Member

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    on a normal/store bought/home-made router there is no way (legally) they can see anything behind the router nor can they access the router in any manner.

    IF IT IS A ROUTER YOUR ISP GAVE YOU then hell yes they can access it. most if not all of the residential stuff has the modem built in as well. they dial into that thing all day long.
     
  10. Martin030908

    Martin030908 Super Moderator

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    What a great read this thread was! :popcorn:
     
  11. aminaked

    aminaked Silver Member

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    I can conclude that you have a one-track mind. Nobody cares about the contract that you're an expert on. We know that Verizon doesn't have to prove anything.

    Where have you gotten your information that Verizon is only concerned with bandwidth and does not analyze traffic??????? The original poster says that they're going to start cracking down on it. It's up to you to ignore it if you want but do you have one shred of evidence to back up your position?
     
  12. jsh1120

    jsh1120 Silver Member

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    Simple logic. If Verizon doesn't need traffic information to accomplish their objectives (i.e. controlling network demand and making heavy users pay for their use), why would they go to the considerable effort and expense to collect it?

    Verizon knows what we all know; that tethering is a means to an end, not an end in itself. They can catch heavy users simply by analyzing volume and declaring that it is accomplished by tethering. Since tethering is prohibited but volume is "unlmited," it provides Verizon a way to accomplish their objective of controlling network traffic without risking a PR disaster and forcing you to prove you're not tethering the device.
     
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