So I've decided to stop using my Nexus 6 and purchase a 6P but I have a couple questions

Discussion in 'Nexus 6P by Huawei' started by patmw123, Nov 3, 2015.

  1. Jonny Kansas

    Jonny Kansas Administrator
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  2. TisMyDroid

    TisMyDroid Super Moderator
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    I drilled several Verizon reps regarding exactly this when I went to the pay per month (ppm) plan. Once you get the phone, you can do whatever you want to with it but you will be responsible for the ppm charge until it is paid off. If you want to sell or give the phone away to anyone in the world, you can. There is no lock on the imei. They said that a common scenario is that person wants to sell the phone, use the money they make on the sale to pay off the balance on their ppm plan so that they can buy a new phone on a ppm plan.

    The one restriction is that if a line still owes on a ppm plan, then that balance has to be paid off before they can purchase another phone using the ppm plan. (although they can purchase a new phone at full retail when they are still paying on a ppm plan).

    The one advantage to being on the ppm plan (or if your phone is no longer in contract) is that you can reduce your $40 line charge to $15. Basically, you are paying an extra $25 per month for two years to have a subsidized phone. In addition, if you have any lines that are no longer in contact, you have to ask them to reduce your line charge to $15. They don't do it automatically. (this only applies to tiered data lines, not unlimited data lines).

    Same holds true for subsidized phones still on contract... you can sell or give that phone away, but you will still remain on contract till that contract expires.

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  3. cr6

    cr6 Super Moderator
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    I do apologize, I wasn't trying to paint you out to be the bad guy, just trying to point out all the issues involved with this method. Ultimately it's your decision and if you're able to make it work for you than that's great.
    Good luck & do keep us updated and let us know how you make out.

    S5 tap'n
     
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  4. tech_head

    tech_head Silver Member

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    So I have done what you suggest.
    The ETF follows the line not the phone. You should activate the phone on your line first. Just long enough to make a phone call. Then factory reset the phone. Then box it back up to sell. I would suggest getting a 64GB version since the market is better for those than the 16GB version.

    There is no real downside except you pay the subsidized plan rate vs. some of the new plans. If you don't have an UDP, but you have one of the plans that they offered with lots of data I see this as a good move.

    I used the BB method to upgrade four lines recently and sold three of the four phones on Swappa.
    I've used Swappa more than a few times. The advantage of Swappa or CL is that both buyer and seller are protected to some degree. I don't like CL, too many scammers.
     
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