Seidio Screen Protector Question

Discussion in 'Seidio' started by mrnelson86, Mar 2, 2010.

  1. mrnelson86

    mrnelson86 Member

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    Dearest Seidio,

    Is there a chemical resistance test that your screen protectors (or even your innocases, but I'm more concerned about the screen protector) go through? I work in a chemistry lab 40+ hours a week and go to school (in chemistry/biochemistry labs) several hours a week in addition to that. My question is which solvents do I need to worry about getting on the screen? (I keep the phone in my lab coat pocket, but lab accidents do happen, and splatter is frequently an issue. Particularly Acetone, Dichloromethane, Methanol, Ethanol, and the like. Any help you could provide would be invaluable!

    Thanks
     
  2. mrnelson86

    mrnelson86 Member

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    bump...???
     
  3. mrnelson86

    mrnelson86 Member

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    still nothing?
     
  4. PhoneZilla

    PhoneZilla New Member

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    The Good the Bad and the Ugly

    I'll take a shot in the dark at this post. Sounds like fun.
    Why don't you be the first screen protector chemical resistance tech on these fora?

    The good thing about screen protectors is that they'll protect the screen from scratches. Screen protectors are cheap so you can buy various brands and see if one holds up better under various chemicals.
    The question is how much protection they'll provide.
    Chemical spills? That's the bad part. Who knows what kind of chem splatters those thin sheets can take?
    You're working in a lab so you have several options. That's good.
    Take an extra screen protector, the same kind that's on your phone and experiment. After all you are in a lab. Right?
    Now take those various chemicals and an eye dropper or cotton swab with your chemical of choice. Dab a little of one chemical on the screen protector and see what happens.
    Keep the chemical on the screen protector until it dries, if it does.
    Does it shrink, get dull, melt, shrivel, explode or nothing?
    Do this with all of the chemicals. Notice if any leaked through the protector. That's bad because your screen would be next.
    The purpose of this lab experiment is to
    help you discover the extent of your screen protectors strength without having to experiment on your actual phone screen. That could be ugly.

    When you're finished with your lab experiment start a new thread that tells us all
    about your findings. That would be helpful, good and entertaining.
     
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