Scratches on screen

Discussion in 'Motorola Droid MAXX' started by cybertj.2000, Aug 26, 2013.

  1. FoxKat

    FoxKat Premium Member
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    OK, so let's not get hung up on technicalities as I am often inclined to do. Yes, a coating would be on top, and if it is scratched it MAY leave a visible mark, however it may not. What type of coating it is - that is, whether it has optical refraction qualities (i.e. causes the light to bend in any way, changes the wavelengths of light that pass through versus get reflected back as was referred to by another member earlier), will determine whether if "scratched" or otherwise removed it will leave a visible scar. I don't think (though I may be wrong), that the oleophobic coating would leave a visible scar if scratched off of a portion of the glass surface.

    Oleophobic coatings are in the range of 2 - 10 NM in thickness, which in itself may be so thin that it's virtually undetectable to the naked eye. Also, the coating may be technically "on" the surface, however remember we're talking about a surface that is full of pits and islands. So what seems like a flat surface to you is actually very rough. The "coating" will actually "fill in" the tiny surface imperfections and will therefore be thicker (we're talking NM here), than where the coating is able to adhere to the islands (if at all). In order for the oleophobic coating to work properly, it has to smooth out the imperfections as much as possible so as to remove any that the oil can latch onto, hence the oil then beads up and looks like it's not there - mostly.

    Here's a few pics of a similar process using a hydrophobic coating (reject water). You'll see the (simulated) surface of the glass, then see the coating applied over a portion of it, then you'll see actual working versions of uncoated and coated glass. The idea is that the water doesn't want to adhere (attach) to the glass.

    GlassSurface-150x150.jpg Glassuntreated-150x150.jpg Glasstreated-150x150.jpg

    I am simply trying to get across the point that for our purposes, we think of most (if not all), scratches on the screens of our phones to be scratches to the actual glass surface. I would bet that 99.98% - 100% of all scratches fall under that realm.
     
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  2. jkaod

    jkaod Gold Member

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    I think you are exactly correct on the oleophobic coating scratches being invisible due to the thinness of the layer. An AR coat would be at least 1/4 wavelenth in thickness so since they are optimized for the wavelength of maximum human retinal sensitivity (about 550nm) it would be at minimum about 135nm. They have to be an odd number of 1/4 wavelengths in thickness so in any event, they are way thicker that any oleophobic coating so scratches in an AR coat are very obvious.

    FoxKat, I'm not sure anyone else cares about our discussion of optics, but I like it. It's part of what I do every day. I think we're getting too science geeky for everyone else. Sorry.
     
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  3. TheOldFart

    TheOldFart Active Member

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    I never designed optics, but I was a ME before I retired, so keep up the geeky optics talk.
     
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  4. TatDroid

    TatDroid Active Member

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    Very informative. Thanks for setting me straight!
     
  5. FoxKat

    FoxKat Premium Member
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    TatDroid...upon re-reading through the thread it may have felt like we were trying to prove you wrong...and that's certainly not the intent. What we didn't want you (or any other members watching), to do though is make decisions due to, or be disgruntled about a situation for the wrong reasons. A scratch is a scratch, no matter how it's caused, no matter whether it's in a coating of some sort, or in the actual glass surface. None of that really matters to the end user. What does matter is how easily a scratch comes about, what can be done to prevent it, whether it leads to eventual breakage of the screen glass, and I suppose most importantly from a user's standpoint whether it is visible and detracts from the user experience or not.

    We've hashed this out pretty well. The conclusion... Glass will scratch with the right parameters, no matter what anyone else tells you. Scratched glass is less visually appealing than glass that's pristine...but we all know that. Glass that's scratched can impede proper visibility of the screen. Scratches can become a real OCD problem...you keep rubbing your fingernail over it, looking at it, bumming out about it. Scratches detract from the value of the phone. And scratches can lead to early failure of the glass due to setting up stress in the glass surface...all it takes to create a full crack then is a bump in the right place, and it might not even require a bump, a simple flexing of the phone, an expansion of the battery, any number of things that will impart torque or pressure on the screen can take a scratch and turn it into a crack.

    What can be done to protect... The answers are relatively simple. Install a good screen protector the moment you open the box, and BEFORE you've even touched the screen. If you do this, the screen will look as beautiful 2 years from now as it does straight out of the packaging. If the screen wasn't protected already, you can install a screen protector at some later date, and two things will happen; One, the existing scratches - if any will virtually disappear from sight. Two, the future of the screen will be much brighter as it will be protected from any future scratches.

    What other things can you do to reduce the likelihood of scratches... WASH YOUR HANDS!! I can't stress this enough. It takes only a microscopic grain of abrasive material (what looks like dirt to you), stuck in one of your fingerprint lines to be rubbed on the screen as you are unlocking, swyping, selecting, etc. to create a very visible, but very superficial scratch that will bug the heck out of you from now until you replace the phone. DON'T use cases that you "slide" the phone into, if that case has ANY part which touches the screen while being inserted or removed, and no matter what that case is made of, man-made or natural (such as leather). Any dirt on (or impurities in), the material or plastic can scratch the screen. DON'T use a case that has a "screen shield", a plastic sheet that "rests" over the screen while the phone is in the case. Dirt and abrasives can (and will), get behind the shield and adhere to the plastic shield, and then will rub and mar, blemish, scratch the screen even while simply being carried in your pocket, purse or on your belt.

    What you should NOT do... NEVER, I repeat NEVER use ANY type of POLISH, no matter how "mild" it may be marketed as being. ANY abrasives will detract from the screen's ability to withstand future scratching by actually removing a portion of the surface that's been treated to protect it from scratches. You MAY remove or diminish the appearance of existing scratches, but you will CERTAINLY be revisiting that process again and far sooner, and as time goes on you'll be chasing your tail.
     
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  6. TheOldFart

    TheOldFart Active Member

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    While a scratch in the glass will result in a stress concentration that will make it more likely for the glass to crack if flexed through many cycles over time or a significant one time flex, I wonder if the manufacturing imperfections at the edge of the glass are even greater crack propagation points then a scratch.
     
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  7. ajarnfalang

    ajarnfalang Member

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    Tell that to the guy who opened this thread. I have a screen film so I don't worry about it.

    The only way to be 100% protected from scratches is a screen protector.

    And when you're paying $700+ for a phone, I don't want to take chances, like your guy who opened this thread who thought JUST LIKE YOU.

    Toodles!
     
  8. FoxKat

    FoxKat Premium Member
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    There's significant reason to question this. So many times, the glass cracks in a typical spider pattern radiating from an initial impact point at an edge.
     
  9. cybertj.2000

    cybertj.2000 Member

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    You are correct, I posted both comments....however, if you read, one was about my DROID RAZR MAXX and the other is in regards to my new DROID MAXX. Different phones. Please read comments in detail before you attempt to make a snide remark or to say that I'm in some way contradicting myself. Thank you.

    Sent from my Droid Maxx!!!
     
  10. cybertj.2000

    cybertj.2000 Member

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    Nothing is 100% effective, I prefer to keep mine naked as I like the quality of the screen and don't want to compromise that by putting a screen protector on my phone that distorts the color and sharpness of the picture.

    Yes, it sucks that I got a couple of tiny scratches on my screen which don't affect the above as they are not visible during normal use, just with the phone off, but I can deal with that.

    If your going to degrade the picture quality why get a phone that has a hd screen?

    Anyways, to each their own. My main reason for starting this topic was to get advice from anyone that has experience in removing or diminishing these already existent scratches.

    Sent from my Droid Maxx!!!
     
  11. ajarnfalang

    ajarnfalang Member

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    Oh no. You're not contradicting yourself. You're just proving the, what is it?, the "general consensus" wrong and me right.

    First you spew the lies about screen protectors, like you're being paid to take down the screen protector companies, then you get a new phone, you stick to your Anti Screen protector lobby and then here you are complaining about scratches.

    The whole thing is hysterical. I'm here laughing my ass off at you.
     
  12. ajarnfalang

    ajarnfalang Member

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    ahahahaha...

    OK. So if I have a screen protector, how am I going to get scratches on the screen underneath?

    A screen protector doesn't degrade anything. It is totally invisible. There are several types of screen protectors. Some you can see, some you can't at all. Some are cheap crap and have a nasty rainbow on it, some are good and totally invisible. some are good but meant for different things, such as fingerprints, and those are made a certain way and are visible. It depends what they're for. Some are for fingerprints, some are for scratches, some are for privacy.

    You know how many times a day people wipe their screen on their pants and shirts? it only takes 1 grain of sand to leave a nasty scratch on your gorilla glass. I think you're doing a dis-service by telling people lies about screen protectors.

    But hey, you're right. Don't put a screen protector.

    ENJOY YOUR SCRATCHED SCREEN!
     
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