Record-breaking 1Tbps Speed achieved Over 5G Mobile Connection

Discussion in 'Tech News' started by LoudRam, Feb 26, 2015.

  1. LoudRam

    LoudRam Senior Member

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    Record-breaking 1Tbps Speed achieved Over 5G Mobile Connection - Hacker News

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    New Generations usually bring new base technologies, more network capacity for more data per user, and high speed Internet service, for which Internet service providers usually advertise. However, it is believed that the fifth generation (5G Technology) of mobile network will be beyond our thoughts.
    1TBPS OVER 5G
    Security researchers from the University of Surrey have just achieved Record-Breaking data speeds during a recent test of 5G wireless data connections, achieving an incredible One Terabit per second (1Tbps) speed – many thousands of times faster than the existing 4G connections.
    After 4G, 5G is the next generation of mobile communication technology that aims at offering far greater capacity and be faster, more energy-efficient and more cost-effective than anything that has seen before. The boffins say 5G will be different – very different.
    The 5G test was conducted at the university's 5G Innovation Centre (5GIC), which was founded by a host of telecoms industry partners including Huawei, Fujitsu, Samsung, Vodafone, EE, Aircom, BT, Telefonica, Aeroflex, BBC and Rohde & Schwarz.

    DOWNLOAD 100 MOVIES IN JUST 3 SECONDS
    1Tbps of speeds are far faster than previouslyannounced 5G tests – Samsung’s 7.5 gigabits per second (Gbps) record, which was 30 times faster than 4G LTE (Long-Term Evolution) speed and just less than 1% of the Surrey team's speed.
    "We have developed 10 more breakthrough technologies and one of them means we can exceed 1Tbps wirelessly. This is the same capacity as fiber optics but we are doing it wirelessly," 5GIC director Prof Rahim Tafazolli told the news website V3.
    With 1Tbps, it is possible to download a file 100 times the size of a feature film in just three seconds. This incredible speed is over 65,000 times faster than the current 4G download speeds.
    5G EXPECTED TO ROLL OUT BY 2020
    The test was carried out over a distance of 100 meters using equipment built at the university. The head of the 5GIC said he planned to demonstrate the technology to the public in 2018. It’s believed that 5G could possibly be available in the UK by 2020.
    UK communications regulator Ofcom has been supportive of efforts to get 5G to the public. Ofcom previously said it expected 5G mobile should be able to deliver speeds between 10 and 50Gbps, compared with the 4G average download speed of 15 Megabits per second (Mbps).
    According to Prof Tafazolli, there were hurdles to overcome before 5G would be ready, he said, "An important aspect of 5G is how it will support applications in the future. We don't know what applications will be in use by 2020, or 2030 or 2040 for that matter, but we know they will be highly sensitive to latency."
    There is a need to bring "end-to-end latency down to below one millisecond" in order to enable latest technologies and applications which would just not be possible with 4G. Tafazolli mentioned 3D holographic chess games on smartphones, controlling connected cars over 5G and other possible future applications requiring such low latency.
    5G – NEW FRONTIER FOR CYBER ATTACKS
    5G will, no doubt, provide a high speed Internet connectivity that would be really a great news for all, but that would be a distinction for cyber criminals as well. In Future, by leveraging 5G technology, it would be very easy for hackers and cybercriminals to take down almost any website on the Internet using Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks.
    In Era of expected 50Gbps Internet speed at home or business, there would be no need for cyber criminals to make a critical infrastructure of botnets by compromising hundreds of thousands of devices, rather they only need few devices with 5G Internet connection to launch the ever largest DDoS attack of around 1 Tbps.
    To resolve such issues in future, High speed Internet service providers and online communications service providers need to setup real time monitoring, reporting, limiting, and mitigation and protection mechanism against DDoS attacks in an attempt to protect online users.
     
  2. grenefroggie

    grenefroggie Super Moderator
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    Much of that article is rather speculative, unrealistic and impractical. While they may have reached 1Tbps, all that means is a better spread of throughput to all clients connected.

    Don't get me wrong, it makes me giggle thinking about it, but by the time users are loaded on to it, you won't see anything resembling it.
     
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  3. Jeffrey

    Jeffrey Premium Member
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    +1 froggie. I was thinking the same prior to reading your comment.
     
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  4. kodiak799

    kodiak799 Gold Member

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    And I still have unlimited data......MUUUUUUAHHAHAHHAWAAAAHA
     
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  5. FoxKat

    FoxKat Premium Member
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    Me too!
     
  6. mountainbikermark

    mountainbikermark Super Moderator
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    The inevitable "carriers want us to have it so we'll get overages" argument to follow since unlimited is the exception and not the rule now? "I just used my whole months data allotment in 1 second"?.......

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  7. 94lt1

    94lt1 Super Moderator
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    Can you imagine the force of a ddos attack at those speeds??? Can you say 3 freight trains?? Wow..
    If you could still sell unlimited lines.. When this comes out.. They'd be a hot commodity.. That's for sure.. But ya can't..
     
  8. kodiak799

    kodiak799 Gold Member

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    Yeah, that's not good customer service. Contrary to popular opinion, overages are in no way a lucrative revenue stream relative to how angry it makes the customer. Caps and overage exist for the sole purpose of incentivizing people to pay for the bandwidth they need. BOTH evil, greedy Comcast and Verizon have called me in the past to get me on new plans that would save me money.

    From my perspective, if we're talking a 1000X increase in bandwidth or more with this tech, there's enough competition to bump everyone's caps 100X while still having a ridiculously huge amount of capacity left for new subscribers and increased usage. This could be what would really open the floodgates to mobile competing as a home ISP. Where it gets murky is the fact that this would compete with some of the carriers' own ISP service, not to mention they pay access fees to broadband providers where they don't have the pipes. You'd probably save some on what you pay in total for mobile and broadband, but certainly less than cutting your total bill in half.
     
  9. grenefroggie

    grenefroggie Super Moderator
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    I believe that people should pay what they use. The average person does not understand what they use versus how much it cost to use it. I don't think metered billing based on usage is necessarily right, as once again it is the ISPs job to provide service, which includes bandwidth costs. That is the whole point of an oversell ratio.

    I hate to see what kind of spectrum is required to make this possible. Forget your wireless router working, lol.
     
  10. kodiak799

    kodiak799 Gold Member

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    But if you restrict the pricing model and network optimization methods you may be forcing their hand. You may, with Title II rules, even be preventing them from implementing optimal solutions.

    If service bottlenecks between 7-10pm because of a 5-fold increase in traffic due to Netflix, then we have a very large problem caused by a relatively small number of users and one content provider. I might even argue that fair IS what Comcast and others were doing to Netflix, because while I think we can all get behind subsidizing start-ups and small fries, I don't think we need to nor should we be subsidizing Netflix and their users.

    Netflix exploiting Net Neutrality for their financial gain is kind of like GE and other large corporations taking advantage of loopholes and corporate welfare. I don't want my service to be throttled or suffer - I want Comcast and Netflix to figure that out.
     
  11. grenefroggie

    grenefroggie Super Moderator
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    These are covered under fair and reasonable network management. That is a pretty wide and open. Even if it is defined, the chances that they will be so stringent it causes issues will likely not be the case. I can't say for sure because I don't know.

    We have a long way to go before we know what this all really means. But I am willing to bet that Comcast and Verizon charging Netflix a premium to access their networks directly.

    As I am reading more and more in to it, I am getting a better understanding on how this effects tier 1 providers, ISPs, and their customers.