Razr Maxx Battery-Do I Need to Calibrate the Battery Tracker

Discussion in 'Smartphone Battery Discussion' started by slaskwroclaw18, Jul 17, 2012.

  1. slaskwroclaw18
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    slaskwroclaw18 New Member

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    Hey guys!
    I have been the proud owner of the Razr Maxx for a little under a week and I have been elated about it so far. Though I have been underwhelmed with the battery so far. The first two days I have had an average battery life of 8 hours with moderate use (I can't use it much during the day because of work) until I upgraded to ICS and did a factory reset. Also I set up some of my smartactions to shut off background syncing when I don't use it, etc. Also I adjusted my display to be less consuming. I also tried draining the battery to around 15-10% and charge it over night (with the phone still on). Now I can probably squeeze 12-14 hours out of the phone with light-moderate use (again for eight hours I can only really text and occasionaly check (FB). Should I keep up with this drain and charge calibration or should my phone be off when I charge?

    Note:
    The reason I suspect a battery tracker calibration as opposed to a dead battery is I downloaded a battery widget that also tells me how many mV I left in the battery along with percentage and this is the pattern roughly:

    4200 mV: 100%
    4100-4000 mV: 90%
    3800-3900 mV: 80%

    And so forth until I hit around 3400-3500 mV which will read 10-15% battery.
    Isn't 3400 mV alot of juice just to be at 10%?!
     
  2. TisMyDroid
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    TisMyDroid Silver Member

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    We need FoxKat. He's the battery king! He will know the answer to your last question. I do know the answer to the other question though and that is, yes charge the phone with your phone off. This prevents any residual drain while charging. The process should be...

    Drain to 10%, turn off phone and charge to 100%, drain to 10%, charge and use as normally would.

    I am guessing FoxKat will be along shortly and he can correct anything I got wrong and answer your last question.

    And welcome to the forum! Have fun with your new Razr Maxx!
     
  3. 94lt1
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    94lt1 DF Super Moderator Staff Member Premium Member

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    I'm not FoxKat.. but I will say that all of these devices, razr/maxx, benefit from battery meter calibration. It doesn't hurt, its free, and its easy... and it keeps you from having a meter that reads 50% , then having a dead phone and wondering why. :)

    Now... we wait for the word of the FoxKat:hail::hail::hail:
    DROID RAZR MAXXIMIZED!!!! PREPARE TO BE VANQUISHED!!!
     
  4. FoxKat
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    FoxKat Resident Novelist...LOL! Staff Member Premium Member

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    I'm here but I'm driving folks, so give me about 10 or 15 minutes and I'll come back

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2
     
  5. TisMyDroid
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    TisMyDroid Silver Member

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    Ahhh, our hero! I knew you would be right along. I want to know the answer to the last question also. My battery goes down to about 3450-3500 at 10%. What is the lowest it should be. What should we expect?
     
  6. FoxKat
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    FoxKat Resident Novelist...LOL! Staff Member Premium Member

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    Really, 3,400mV isn't all that low for a 10% battery level. First you have to be sure you're actually at 10% before you even begin to question the 3,400mV reading. Unless you are using an accurate battery tool with a 1% increment AND the meter for the battery must be calibrated to the battery accurately.

    Then, you need to understand the typical discharge curve of a Lithium Ion (and more specifically for us a Lithium Ion Polymer Pouch Pack) battery. It's quite a bit different than other types of batteries, which is both good and bad. Good because computerized electronics need a very steady voltage that is within a rather tight range to operate. Too low, the computerized electronics will start acting strangely, throwing errors, force closes, corrupting data, and completely freezing. The same happens in reverse if the voltage is too high, mainly due to the excess heat that voltages which are too high will cause, and even worse, in high voltages situations permanent damage can occur.

    What makes LIPO batteries uniquely well suited for our devices is that the voltages for these batteries, when operating in the safe range and with the limits in charging and discharging are set to levels that provide the best blend of runtime and battery life will be relatively flat for the greatest part of the discharge cycle. See the image below for a representation.

    View attachment 53106

    Now before I go on, a disclosure. This is a representation of a battery that is being discharged at a rate that is 6 times the battery's capacity, or in other words, if the battery can supply 1000mAh, this battery is being asked to put out 6,000mAh, so of course, it won't last 1 hour. Here you see the battery holding out for about 9 minutes. Could you imagine if our phones only had a 9 minute runtime? :blink:

    Anyway, we're only using this chart to show one thing...how the voltages drop at different rates during different parts of the discharge period. You'll notice that the voltage drops off rather quickly during the first 10% of the discharge cycle here (100% to 90%), or from about 3.85V to about 3.675V. Then it drops from 3.675V to 3.5V in the next 10% (90% to 80%) Then you'll notice it drops off very gradually from there to about the end of the 7th minute (80% to 30% - or HALF the entire battery's power cycle), from about 3.5V to about 3.4V over a range of 50%. Then it starts to look like the same roll-off rate for the next 10% (30% to 20%) or so that it did from 90% to 80%, and then in the next 10% (20% to 10%) or so it drops rapidly, and in the last 10% (10% to 0%), it's in a near free-fall.

    Even though this chart is for a far more aggressive discharge cycle than our phones will EVER come across, it is still a good representation of how our discharge cycle looks, although you would have to stretch this about 60 to 120 times wider (9 to 18 hours).

    This chart also shows something I've tried to impress on everyone. The battery suffers stress at the top of the charge curve and at the bottom, or in other words where the curve is at its greatest rate of change. On the other hand, the battery is quite happy to cruise along with very little stress during the middle of the discharge curve, that 50% portion between about 80% and 30%. That is the sweet spot for the battery where if it's kept running in that range, or charged to 80% and used to 30% religiously, it will provide the longest lifespan, in terms of how long it will last over time, years or number of charge cycles.

    Lastly, you'll notice a dotted red line through the bottom of the chart. That's the critical voltage level where the battery should really be charged. Truth is these "minutes" across the bottom shouldn't really be used interchangeably with percentages in the range of 100% to 0%, but instead the 0 through 9 should be divided into 10 sections, so that at minute 9, when the voltage hits 3V, that should be considered DROP DEAD voltage and 0% or less. This is WHY I tell EVERYONE, DON'T discharge to 0%. It's a very short trip from 3V at 0% to 2.5V - 2.7v at -3% or so, AND where the battery will shut down permanently and never take a charge again.

    One final afterthought. If you DO happen to discharge to 0%, and if your meter is properly calibrated, you should be fine as long as you get back onto charge SOON, however, if your meter is out of calibration, it can SAY 0%, but be at 2.9V or 2.85V - dangerously low, and might be unresponsive to the charger (White light of death or bootlooping). SOOOOOO.....

    Heed thy words, my child, lest you be without the power!!
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2012
  7. slaskwroclaw18
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    slaskwroclaw18 New Member

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    Sounds good. How many days should I do this for until I see an improvement and will it dramatically improve my battery life? I see posts of people getting 24+ hours of battery life and I am green with envy!
     
  8. slaskwroclaw18
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    slaskwroclaw18 New Member

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    Thanks FoxKat. I now understand why you are so revered here! So essentially 80-30% mark the voltage should see a relatively low rate of change as opposed to the beginning and end of a cycle?
     
  9. FoxKat
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    FoxKat Resident Novelist...LOL! Staff Member Premium Member

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    Actually, it's right...but backwards...LOL! It's Charge to 100% with power off, discharge to 10%, charge to 100% with power off, use normally from there forward. This should be repeated about every 2-3 months. About 3 months between trainings for the MAXX (larger battery means less charges for the same number of hours of use, so longer between trainings), and about 2 months for the RAZR.

    This training will only take 2 days to complete, the few hours to charge the first time, the full day's use (or more depending on your usage patterns), and then the partial day (or night) to charge again.
     
  10. FoxKat
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    FoxKat Resident Novelist...LOL! Staff Member Premium Member

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    Yes, and so the battery is at its happiest, remains the coolest through those ranges and provides the best "volume" (current, i.e. mV/h), over the longest timeframe (50% of the total battery's rated capacity).
     
  11. TisMyDroid
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    TisMyDroid Silver Member

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    Do a cycle of this once every (edit oops)2-3 months. In between, charge as you normally would. Shorter more frequent charges with the phone left on are fine. And like FoxKat explained, if you can as often as possible, charge up to around 80% when it gets to around 30%. (But truth be told, don't tell FoxKat, I am notorious for going down to 10% and charging to 100%).
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2012
  12. FoxKat
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    FoxKat Resident Novelist...LOL! Staff Member Premium Member

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    :icon_eek: I saw that ^^ !! :icon_ devil:

    But don't worry. It simply means that where someone else who is less aggressive with their charges and discharges will still have strong battery life at 2.5 years later, yours will be suffering at 1.5 years.
     
  13. TisMyDroid
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    TisMyDroid Silver Member

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    Oh wonderful! I always knew I was backward, lol! But listen to FoxKat!
     
  14. FoxKat
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    FoxKat Resident Novelist...LOL! Staff Member Premium Member

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    I have gotten nearly 3 days with my MAXX. Right now, I am at 70% remaining after 13 hours plus of use. See images below...(wait...they're coming).

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2012
  15. FoxKat
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    :blink: Please excuse the advertisements at the bottoms of those images...I didn't pick them! LOL!
     
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