More Details Shared on our Future Wireless Internet: LTE-Advanced

Discussion in 'Android News' started by dgstorm, Jan 31, 2013.

  1. dgstorm
    Online

    dgstorm Editor in Chief Staff Member Premium Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2010
    Messages:
    7,115
    Likes Received:
    1,317
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    [​IMG]

    One of our awesome forum members & Rescue Squad folks, Grenefroggie, sent us this cool "white-paper-style" article on the future our our wireless networks. Since 2011 we have been sharing tidbits about the next generation of LTE, which is called Advanced LTE. Ironically, Advanced LTE actually fits the moniker of 4G beter than current technology does. Technically, the ITU defines 4G as needing to be 100 Mbps or better, and that is exactly where LTE Advanced starts and goes up from there.

    In the article that we have linked below, a great number if fascinating historical and technical factors for the technology are explored. Furthermore, if the article itself is not technical enough for you, then you can find several links to actual "white paper" write-ups scattered throughout. It's definitely worth a few minutes or more of your time, especially if you are curious to see what the next step in wireless internet will bring.

    Thanks for the tip, Grenefroggie! And, thanks for helping it get to me, UltraDroid & CR6!

    Source: DailyWireless.org
  2. combatmedic870
    Offline

    combatmedic870 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2011
    Messages:
    1,315
    Likes Received:
    49
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Portland OR
    sooooo when are we going to see the 300mbps? Maybe with the advanced....?:blink:
    4 people like this.
  3. sonicxtacy02
    Offline

    sonicxtacy02 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2010
    Messages:
    244
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Is there some overarching reasoning as to why wireless data transmission speeds need to be that high? I'm all about tech advances and such, but I cannot think of a scenario in which a consumer would need anywhere near that promised speed of LTE-A. How about optimizing the current spectrum so that data rates decrease?
  4. combatmedic870
    Offline

    combatmedic870 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2011
    Messages:
    1,315
    Likes Received:
    49
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Portland OR

    Government and Military purposes. They get gov't kick backs for putting this stuff up. Verizon promises lte/4g by blah blah blah and the gov't says thank you.

    Same reason highway over passes are still being built to a specific height. :)

    BTW Im not a conspiracy theorist or anything. Just how it is. Home land security wants the infrastructure in place.
    2 people like this.
  5. NeoPhoenixTE
    Offline

    NeoPhoenixTE Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2010
    Messages:
    256
    Likes Received:
    24
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Fort Collins, CO
    Putting aside the obvious "why the hell not?" reasoning for a moment..

    We may not see the reason for it today, but, if history is any indication, our data demands are going to continue to increase, and we're going to need spectrum to meet that demand.

    It's simply a matter of which will come out first: the speeds, or the apps that need that kind of speed.
    3 people like this.
  6. lloydstrans
    Offline

    lloydstrans Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2011
    Messages:
    9,785
    Likes Received:
    72
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Point to ponder.

    How much speed will it take to send holographic images or arrange your nanocats correctly?

    aliens don't use razr's, they use obsidian.
  7. lloydstrans
    Offline

    lloydstrans Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2011
    Messages:
    9,785
    Likes Received:
    72
    Trophy Points:
    48
    I'm all for this.

    aliens don't use razr's, they use obsidian.
  8. Asgard
    Offline

    Asgard New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2012
    Messages:
    107
    Likes Received:
    13
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I don't have the source right now, but I read that the original 4G standard was about that speed (1Gb/s up 100Mb/s down IIRC) But then the telecommunications companies said "woah, calm down, we can´t keep upt with those speeds" so the standard was lowered.

    And yeah, it's because of size of content, it's not the same to download a full DVD quality movie, an Full HD blu-ray quality or a 4K/8K movie.
  9. kodiak799
    Offline

    kodiak799 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2010
    Messages:
    4,830
    Likes Received:
    226
    Trophy Points:
    63
    So a quick survey of that chart says this should yield a 2-3x increase in speeds.

    In my experience, bandwidth is no longer the issue for faster browsing. It's processor/rendering and, increasingly, how fast the website is actually sending the data (many sites understandably seem to have bargain servers that transmit only around 3mbs).

    I think the interesting upside is ditching cable all together (tv and broadband) and streaming our shows. It would require a rather massive bandwidth to stream an HD blu-ray. A non-issue for most HDTV broadcast in 720p though.
  10. xeene
    Online

    xeene Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2010
    Messages:
    1,708
    Likes Received:
    178
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    usa
    Have your tried to stream multiple 1080p content to different locations simultaneously?

    Here is a scenario. You come home with wife and kids where your only source of cable/internet/entertainment is your cellular device. Soon as you enter home, device recognizes location, turns on hot spot and all your htpcs/smart tvs connect to it. Now all tv content is 1080p or higher and all people want to watch different things at same time. You will need 60mbps or higher connection.

    I do that now with my verizon unlimited data and can only stream single hd content or multiple sd contents.

    And I'm not going to subscribe to cable/internet in a vacation house that we visit on weekends during summer time when our cellular devices/plans can do the job.
    3 people like this.
  11. 52brandon
    Offline

    52brandon New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2010
    Messages:
    1,019
    Likes Received:
    18
    Trophy Points:
    0
    the point is because file sizes are due to increase over the years. So it makes perfect sense to me. Screen resolution is beyond what we need. Processor capabilities are as well. Battery capabilities are lagging behind more than anything right now. But that data speed will help with all consumer electronics, most likely high-end vidfeogames first, then streaming nbext-gen movies (after blu-ray)
  12. xeene
    Online

    xeene Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2010
    Messages:
    1,708
    Likes Received:
    178
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    usa
    Games hardly use any data. One movie is like gaming for a month.
  13. Phreaker47
    Offline

    Phreaker47 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2010
    Messages:
    755
    Likes Received:
    20
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Indeed, if we want to talk about eliminating the need for physical media like bluray, then we need this kind of speed. And if 4k HDTV becomes standard, even this might not really be enough.
  14. kodiak799
    Offline

    kodiak799 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2010
    Messages:
    4,830
    Likes Received:
    226
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Now that you mention it, I wonder why I have a PS3 for the blu-ray player when I haven't rented a dvd in years (either Netflix or usually on-demand)...gotta find a redbox nearby
  15. Phreaker47
    Offline

    Phreaker47 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2010
    Messages:
    755
    Likes Received:
    20
    Trophy Points:
    18
    People are choosing convenience over quality. I went to online-only with Netflix when they announced they were increasing the prices a while back. And Netflix has had pretty decent HD quality and DD 5.1 on some stuff for a while now.

    I tell myself to use Redbox more often too.. (especially with this blu-ray burner I have... wink)
  16. kodiak799
    Offline

    kodiak799 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2010
    Messages:
    4,830
    Likes Received:
    226
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Yeah, my problem with Netflix is I'd have to relocate my router to get the bandwidth for HD. But the reason I never stick with Netflix is they don't stream hardly any movies I want to watch. Their new PS3 interface is awful, as well.
  17. Asharad
    Offline

    Asharad New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2010
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    To maintain a competitive edge. BTW, I remember when 28.8kbps was blazing fast.
  18. comk4ver
    Offline

    comk4ver Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2010
    Messages:
    604
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Lol another ancient one! I remember when I donated a 28 when I got myself a 56!
  19. combatmedic870
    Offline

    combatmedic870 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2011
    Messages:
    1,315
    Likes Received:
    49
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Portland OR
    I remember upgrading to go to 28.8 from 14.4!! Those were the days. :D

    When the internet first came about i remember going to the U of I and messing with it. which was even slower the 14.4!
  20. VirtualCLD
    Offline

    VirtualCLD Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2010
    Messages:
    73
    Likes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Kids these day, i remember when I got my super fast 2400 (2.4K) modem. I could finally send and receive data faster than I could type and play Warcraft 1 multiplayer (but still not fast enough for early FPS games)! :biggrin:
Search tags for this page

future wireless internet

,
lte-advanced dgstorm