Mid level or older high end device?

Discussion in 'Off Topic Forum' started by cr6, Feb 23, 2015.

  1. cr6

    cr6 Super Moderator
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    I got the idea for this thread after reading Stormys news story about LGs new mid range devices. LG Announces Several New Mid Budget Range Androids Magna Spirit Leon Joy Android Forum at DroidForums.net I didn't want to derail his thread, so I thought I would pose the question here.

    My question regarding the purchase of a new "mid range" device would be: Why?

    Wouldn't you be better off purchasing a 12-18 month old "high end" (flagship) model at a similar price point? You'd get equal (and usually much better) hardware specs, camera & larger battery.
    I guess I've just never understood the reasoning behind the whole "mid level" market, (aside from the obvious: price) unless the smaller 4.7" size factors into most people's purchasing decision.
    I understand the manufacturers view in regards to providing a new device for all budgets. But the reality of purchasing an older flagship model (which you can usually still buy "new" through most carriers up to 2 years later) sounds more appealing to me. What do you guys think?
    Unless you're buying an older iPhone. (those devices really hold their value)
    I'm not knocking the market and I certainly understand folks being budget conscious, just questioning the overall reasoning behind someone's decision to go mid-level over an older high end device.
    What are your thoughts?

    S5 tap'n
     
    #1 cr6, Feb 23, 2015
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2015
  2. 94lt1

    94lt1 Super Moderator
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    Let me make sure I'm on the same page... Instead of getting a new, mid range device.. Get last year's flagship (or along those lines)

    I completely agree with that.. But some people think that new is better... I look at it like.. By last year's hot rod for about the same price(depending on when it was released and when the next flag ship will release)

    Or buy a Taurus for just as much.. I'd prefer the flagship from last year.. Just me though..
     
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  3. grenefroggie

    grenefroggie Super Moderator
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    I refer a lot of my low income friends to buy older flagships. The market is huge! We have a lot of non-citizens in my area that buy up old flagships, and I make good money on my old phone sales. I am now out and have no backups.
     
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  4. bsweetness

    bsweetness Moderator
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    While I certainly agree with the underlying premise here, there are a few factors that those who buy mid-range devices often consider.
    • Price: For many mid-range devices, the on contract price is less than the on contract or off contract price of a year old flagship. Mid-range devices exist to target those who don't have as much money to spend on a device. And for pre-paid phones, the off contract price of mid-range devices is often less than the price of an older flagship. For those of us here, we might be willing to spend an extra $50-$100 for a more powerful device, but we place an importance on having a better device. Most users out there simply want something that will work. A mid-range device fills the usability and price needs for most people.
    • Availability: There's something to be said for walking into a store and walking out with your device. If you limit your selection to what's available in your local store, you're almost always looking at current flagships, mid-range devices, and a few flagships from last year (except for iPhones, it's rare to see a major carrier stock a two-year-old smartphone from a major OEM). Employees are always going to push people towards newer devices, even if they have lower specs. So a lot of folks may not ever seriously consider the older flagship. Most people also aren't going to think about trying to find an older model somewhere other than a carrier store or third-party retailer. Even if they did, most don't know where to look for them outside of Craig's List or eBay, and they may not want to use those sites.
    • Knowledge: The vast majority of smartphone users out there aren't as savvy as users of this site when it comes to knowing what to look for in a phone. They only go off what they see in the store or hear about in a commercial. If they can't afford the latest flagship they saw in a commercial or in an ad, a new mid-range device might easily seem more appealing to them than an older flagship. Newness and marketing go a long way, especially with those who aren't as knowledgeable about the market.
    • Location: Most of these mid-range devices are released in developing countries. The U.S. certainly gets a few of them too, but not the bulk of them. In many countries, high-end flagships don't sell as well due to the fact that most people can't afford them. So OEMs focus on releasing mid-range and budget devices that people can afford in those locations. In many cases, an old flagship isn't an option at all because there's simply no stock available locally.
     
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  5. Sajo

    Sajo Diamond Member

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    Excellent points @bsweetness!
     
  6. grenefroggie

    grenefroggie Super Moderator
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    Agreed!!
     
  7. Jeffrey

    Jeffrey Premium Member
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    The used market here in Asia is huge. It's due to income level. I just sold my G3. I paid $750 and got $400. The condition of my phone was classified "like new" and was sold before I left the store for $475.
    The retailer told me, since the introduction of new midrange phones, sales are down by 25%.
    A manufacturer only sells a phone once. When it hits the used market, their own phone becomes a competitor.
    To combat this, manufactures now provide midrange phones $350 - $450 and have created a new channel that they didn't have before.
     
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  8. grenefroggie

    grenefroggie Super Moderator
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    Good insight.
     
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