Is the nexus program what it used to be?

Discussion in 'Android General Discussions' started by pc747, Oct 23, 2013.

  1. pc747

    pc747 Administrator
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    Waking From the Nexus Dream [Opinion] ? Droid Life

    Read an article on Droid-life and that had me asking myself questions about the nexus program.

    Is the nexus program still about aspiring or has it become something else?

    Let's be honest, with Samsung pushing the limits on hardware, motorola trying to change how we use our phone when you look at what the nexus could have been do the n5 (based on the rumored specs and pic) live up to that. And would it just be better for google to push for more google edition devices than to continue the path they have been on the past 2 or 3 years of taking a device like the g1, g2 or s2 and redesigning it to have that clean look?

    Want to hear your thoughts.
     
  2. dezymond

    dezymond Tech Support Mod
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    I still think the Nexus stands for what Google envisions for the future. By that I mean software wise, because the Nexus line always gets the latest updates first. Eventually other devices receive the update along with manufacturer variations, but the Nexus programs means you are the first to try, even before the Google Edition phones. Nexus owners are given first peek into what direction Google is taking Android in.

    Not only does it provide this, but as the article states, it's a developers' dream phone, plain and simple. You're given a clean slate with very good hardware, almost like handing an artist a blank canvas. And it's to please the small percentage that are the Android enthusiasts.

    So a Nexus device doesn't give us the top of the line specs or the easiest of user experience. It does both these fairly well, but the main point is that a Nexus device gives you a glimpse into the next generation of software and devices. It's proof that it's not all about hardware and that optimization of software can lead to a "better" phone. I think Moto learned from the Nexus line and are taking the same path with their devices, but focusing more on the user experience.