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Independent App Stores Take On The Android Market

Discussion in 'Android Forum' started by Shadez, Jun 14, 2010.

  1. Shadez
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    Shadez Super Mod/News Team Staff Member Premium Member

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    Independent App Stores Take On The Android Market

    [​IMG]14. Jun, 2010 written by Priya Ganapati / wired.com[​IMG]1 Comment
    [​IMG]

    Google’s official Android app store is getting some competition as upstart, independent challengers create their own app stores to lure users with the promise of more freedom, better access to apps and increased revenue.

    But it’s all kosher because, unlike Apple, Google allows for multiple app stores to exist on the Android operating system.
    A new Android app store called AndSpot plans to coax developers and users to try an alternative Android app store with better search and app-recommendation features.

    “Google’s Android Market is slow and not as user friendly as it can be,” says Ash Kheramand, one of the co-founders of AndSpot. ”You don’t leave the Market thinking ‘this is great.’ Instead you are thinking, this is slow, clunky, and if you are a developer, ‘my app is not getting much exposure.’”

    Over the next few weeks, Kheradmand and his co-founder Faisal Abid are hoping to unveil a snazzy new app store that they say will have better design and a better way to discover apps.

    “We want to bring a level of personalization to the marketplace,” says Kheradmand. AndSpot is currently in private beta with its features available only to a small group of developers and users. (Two hundred Gadget Lab readers can check out Andspot using the invite code: WIRED3R5TY.)

    Andspot is not the only one trying to take on the official Google app store. Larger publishers such as Handango and GetJar have distributed a number of apps through their stores across multiple platforms — though on the iPhone they just publish individual apps.

    But now smaller Android exclusive startups such as Andspot, SlideMe and AndAppStore are getting into the fray. Why develop just an app when you can build an app store, they say.

    Similar to the official Google app store, these startups are hoping to become a central distribution platform for developers who want to get their apps out. The difference, they say, is they will go where Android Market has failed to tread.

    “It’s all about promising more attention for apps,” says Vincent Hoogsteder, co-founder and CEO of Distimo, an apps analytics company. “If you are a developer targeting a specific market, it is easier to put your app in a store focusing on that, instead of losing yourself in the Android Market. If you are a consumer, then the idea is to help you find better apps.”

    Google launched Android, an open, free, mobile operating system, in 2008. And like Apple, which pioneered the app-store idea, the Android OS also allows independent software applications through its Android Market. But that’s where the comparison ends.

    Apple approves every app that makes it to its App Store. And it allows for just one app store, the Apple App Store. Rejects from Apple’s app store have the option of going to an underground store called Cydia. But Cydia apps are available to only jailbroken iPhones.

    Google hopes to avoid that with Android. Multiple app stores can exist on the Android phone and apps don’t have to be approved before they hit the official Android app store.

    In an intensely crowded app world, getting noticed is the big challenge. Finding Facebook, Shazam or Pandora on the Android Market is easy. But for smaller apps like Time Lapse or Zum Zum, the key to survival is finding enough eyeballs.
    “There are 50,000 apps in the Android Market, while your phone lists only 50 apps at a time,” says Hoogsteder. “You are seeing just a fraction of what’s out there.”

    That’s why many new Android app stores such as AndroLib and AppBrain have focused on being meta-stores, places that aggregate and let you search Android apps. But to actually download the apps, users have to go to the Android Market.

    AndSpot and SlideMe are a step ahead. They are trying to convince enough developers to publish apps directly to their stores, in addition to offering them on the official Google Market. So users who have SlideMe or AndSpot will never have to go to the Android Market, if they don’t want to. Developers don’t have to make any changes to their apps intended for the Google Android Market before they list it on AndSpot or SlideMe.

    SlideMe, which launched in April 2008, doesn’t take a cut of the revenue from app sales. When apps are sold through its store, SlideMe subtracts a payment-processing fee required by the credit card company (which usually is about 3.5 percent) and any applicable tax, and lets developers keep the rest. Apple and Google both allow developers to keep just 70 percent of the revenue they get from their sales.

    Instead, SlideMe makes money by licensing its entire app store to gadget manufacturers. That also means SlideMe’s app store will come pre-loaded on a phone similar to Google’s Android Market.

    Last year, SlideMe landed its first deal with Vodafone Egypt to pre-load its app store on the HTC Magic. The SlideMe app store will also be on Sony Ericsson’s Xperia X10 phones sold in the Middle East.

    “Not all manufacturers can comply with the requirements of Google, so Google can’t give them the app store,” says Christopoulos. “That’s why SlideMe can be on more than just phones. We are thinking netbooks and in-car infotainment systems.”

    AndSpot says, for now, it plans to offer developers an 80 percent cut of the revenues from its app store. But Kheradmand is not sure AndSpot can sustain the pace. “We are operating on very thin margins here,” he says.

    Offering developers more revenue by finding ways to make money off their apps is key to the survival of these independent app stores.

    Google’s Android Market lags behind its peers when it comes to paid apps. Distimo’s analytics show almost 75 percent of apps in the Apple App Store are paid, compared to just under 43 percent in the Android Market.

    Only nine countries are allowed to distribute Android paid apps currently because of Google checkout restrictions, points out Hoogsteder. Consumers from only 13 countries can get access to paid content.

    That cuts out a lot of international developers and users, says Christopoulos. For instance, a Polish developer created a game called Speed Forge 3D that couldn’t be sold through the Android app store in many countries because of restrictions around Google Checkout. The app is listed on SlideMe for approximately $3.

    SlideMe will also focus on localized apps and tailor its app store by country.

    “You might be from a country in the Middle East and not speak English. We can help you find apps in your local language,” says Christopoulos.

    AndSpot says both users and developers will find the independent Android-focused app stores a sweet deal.
    “Users will go where the apps are, and developers will be attracted because they have nothing to lose,” says Kheradmand.

    Read More Independent App Stores Take On Google’s Android Market | Gadget Lab | Wired.com

    Independent App Stores Take On The Android Market | Androidheadlines.com
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2010
  2. Darkseider
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    Darkseider New Member

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    This is freakin awesome and this is the reason that Android will eventually take over in the mobile market. Freedom and choice. Plain and simple.
  3. Shadez
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    Shadez Super Mod/News Team Staff Member Premium Member

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    I agree, its going to push competitiveness and quality in every aspect. Will be much less 'junk' apps, much more variety, much better quality..

    I also, think we will start to see 'specialized, micro-brewery type' app stores popping up, with focus on individual interests, such as music, travel, education and so on ..
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2010
  4. Sweettooth
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    Sweettooth New Member

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    +1
    Choice is what it's all about and why Apple will eventually crumble under the weight of it's own linearism (I don't think that's a real word lol).

    One thing I like is how they say unlike Google, their store doesn't take a cut of the profits but instead each item sold has an imposed fee. I'd like to see how long they get by giving a bigger cut to the developers. My experience has shown me that a small organization with less resources giving bigger handouts normally plateaus after a while with its competitors. As it says, AndSpot doesn't know how long it can offer the developers 80% of the profits, and if that percentage falls, it wont be too far off from Google's.

    Choice is awesome, but if it's just a bunch of stores offering the same products and same deals, then it's not choice, it's redundancy. Time will tell...
  5. kodiak799
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    kodiak799 Well-Known Member

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    Google hasn't made many missteps. Supposedly they are coming out with a new app store that can be fully browsed over your computer, and then sync a download you select with your Droid (or something like that).

    Really, I think maybe just the search feature needs to improve for the app store. It can be slow and quarky at times, but for the most part I don't browse market much, but when I discover something I want for my phone I go to market and do a search.

    LOL, fair point there are some great apps out there I would find useful and have no clue about.
  6. Shadez
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    Shadez Super Mod/News Team Staff Member Premium Member

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    http://www.droidforums.net/forum/droid-general-discussions/46235-new-android-market-coming-soon.html
  7. aaf709
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    aaf709 Nice Guy Premium Member

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    This is pretty sweet!
  8. MiXoLoGiSt
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    MiXoLoGiSt New Member

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    Independent app stores are going to have a tough time because the Devs wont want to feature their apps on an app store that takes a cut out of the apps revenue.
  9. kevin@teslacoilsw
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    kevin@teslacoilsw New Member

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    Well Google takes a 30% cut from sales on the Android Market.

    A big reason for dev support of a third party app store is sales in other countries. Right now the market is great for reaching Americans and a handful of other countries, but there are plenty of countries where paid applications aren't available. I've done paypal transactions with some users in these countries, but it's not nearly as convenient as an actual app store.
  10. Bilgediver
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    Bilgediver New Member

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    I actually have slideme on my phone. Initially because I wanted to purchase the advanced version of quadrant (only available on slideme's market, only basic is available on android market), but now I've been browsing it and it looks promising: fairly easy to navigate, AND it does support paypal!!

    Droidforums.net appified!
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