I forgot to tell you guys

Discussion in 'Droid RAZR' started by LoneWolfArcher, Jan 2, 2012.

  1. LoneWolfArcher

    LoneWolfArcher Silver Member

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    So as you probably know, I am a big hunter.

    I got my Razr on 11/11. I went hunting that weekend. Just like my HTC Eris, trying to navigate the touchscreen with gloves was difficult. I could do it with some issues with the UnderArmour liner gloves. But if I put thicker gloves on forget it.

    I bought one of the 14 piece accessory packs off of ebay. It included screen protectors. I put the screen protector on recently. I went hunting this weekend and a remarkable things occurred. I could use the touchscreen with the liners and thicker gloves on! Granted I use swipe, but I was stunned at how well I could use the touchscreen wearing the gloves!!

    Does the screen protector somehow increase the TS sensitivity?
     
  2. FoxKat

    FoxKat Premium Member
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    Interesting. Perhaps the screen protector is increasing the sensitivity by raising the capacitance level across the entire screen such that even a miniscule amount of additional capacitance anywhere on the screen (above any of the intersection capacitors) causes it to trigger a touch. You should download Multitouch Test from the market and see just how many finger touches it can sense with your gloves on. The screen supports upto 10 finger presses at once, so 5 fingers per hand, two hands, means it can sense all 10 fingers at once. I have tried it and it works.
     
  3. RETG

    RETG Active Member

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    Trying to figure out how a screen protector would allow the charge to flow from the screen to the finger; in order to make a capacitive screen to operate? I know they make gloves; one with conductive fibers inlaid or one with small metal finger tips, both allow the charge to flow from the screen to the finger, thus through the body.

    Hopefully, someone can explain how this can happen with a different screen protector. I'm curious....
     
  4. LoneWolfArcher

    LoneWolfArcher Silver Member

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    I am baffled by it myself. And wouldn't believe it except I saw it with my own eyes and did it with my own glove covered fingers!
     
  5. eidian

    eidian Member

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    Maybe the 748 update increased the sensitivity? I think it was in a change log for Superuser where I saw that the sensitivity was increased for Swyping across menus.

    Maybe the same thing was done by Motorola?

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using DroidForums
     
  6. FoxKat

    FoxKat Premium Member
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    With the RAZR's "Mutual Capacitance" touch screens there is no actual electrical conduction taking place between your finger and the screen. What these screens do is measure any changes in the capacitance (the ability to hold a static charge) at the grid intersections where tiny capacitors are connected below the screen. By even just bringing your finger near a capacitive junction you create a change in the capacitance similar to how static electricity causes things to attract each other and eventually cling together or discharge with a spark, like when you touch a metal object. You see a capacitor doesn't actually conduct electricity internally, instead it stores a differential of positive and negative electrons (static electricity) on the plates at opposite sides of an insulating barrier. The electrons are held there by the magnetic attractions of the opposing positive and negative charges in a miniature magnetic field, but since the insulator won't let the electrons jump to the other side and mate up with the awaiting oppositely charged electrons, they are in a "static" state waiting for the chance to discharge.

    The only conducting of electricity happens outside the capacitor when an electrical connection is made between the two terminals (like your finger and the water faucet). At that moment, the opposing electrons see the electrical connection as the easiest path to that opposite attraction and rush through the wires across the two terminals to neutralize each other. This is why unlike batteries capacitors can dump huge amounts of current (essentially all their stored capacity) in a flash - not much different than the way you get a static shock in the winter or when lightning strikes.

    In fact, a lightning strike is a giant capacitor where the cloud holds massive amounts of either negatively or positively charged electrons, and the ground is essentially the opposite pole. When lightning actually strikes, it's because a large enough difference is built up to allow the current to arc across the "terminals (cloud and ground) and release the charge. Since air is a poor conductor of electricity (actually a very good insulator) it acts like the insulator in a solid state capacitor allowing the opposing charges to build up until it's able to arc. Unlike a capacitor though, when lightning strikes it is actually traveling between the poles and through the air (insulator) by jumping from cloud (terminal) to ground (terminal).

    The symbol for a capacitor looks like two capital T's on their sides and head to head View attachment 45858 , but with a small space between them to illustrate the two plates (the crosspieces of the T) and the insulator (the gap or air). There is no electrical connection between both sides, so there is no part of the left side that touches the right.


    Sent from my DROID RAZR using DroidForums
     
    #6 FoxKat, Jan 12, 2012
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2012
  7. satarecah

    satarecah Member

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    You know they do sell gloves you can use your touch screen with right?
     
  8. FoxKat

    FoxKat Premium Member
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    These screens I've found out will work even while the entire phone is inside a waterproof diving pouch so conductive gloves are not necessary in many cases.

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using DroidForums
     
  9. satarecah

    satarecah Member

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    Well im just saying they sell touch screen gloves idk why xD
     
  10. FoxKat

    FoxKat Premium Member
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    Sorry, didn't mean to sound like I was discounting your comment. Those types of gloves can be helpful for this type of display (mutual capacitance), especially when the gloves are thick. This display doesn't require an actual electrical conduction to detect a screen press, but does require that an electrical conductor be held VERY CLOSE to the screen. If gloves are too thick, they will prevent the finger (conductor) from coming close enough to effect the field change (interference) and allow the screen to recognize the capacitance variation to signal a finger press.

    To demonstrate, take a piece of notebook paper (you'll agree that dry paper doesn't conduct electricity), and lay it over the display, then touch the paper with your finger. You'll find after lifting the paper that the finger press was detected by whatever app you pressed having started. Now start adding pieces of paper and each time try to press the screen. I've found that at about 8 sheets of paper it can no longer detect my finger! So the paper in this case acts only as a spacer, which increases the distance of my finger from the screen to the point where it doesn't disrupt the field enough to be detected.

    By having conductive strands in the material, these conductive capacitance gloves bring your finger tip (or the electrical conduction to it) right to the surface of the glove, allowing it to effect the magnetic field inside the capacitor enough to detect the finger press, just as if you had no gloves on at all. There are other types of capacitive displays which either benefit more from those gloves, or at least one type (conducive capacitance), in which your finger actually becomes one of the conductive plates, these gloves are necessary.

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using DroidForums
     
    #10 FoxKat, Jan 12, 2012
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2012