How to Comment at the FCC on their Dumb Internet Fast Lane Idea of Net Neutrality

Discussion in 'Android News' started by dgstorm, Aug 5, 2014.

  1. zinethar

    zinethar Active Member

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    I already pay Time Warner extra for internet speed that is fast enough to watch netflix without buffering all the time. They already have a fast vs slow lanes as paid for by consumers. So now they want BOTH sides of the connection to pay for fast lanes. You would think they could already see the writing on the wall. People can't afford or don't want to afford the constantly growing costs. Cable cutting has already gotten the wired company's attention. I fear/or hope for the change that we will see very soon when this implodes.
     
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  2. Vepaot

    Vepaot Active Member

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    This video sums up everything I feel about American cable companies. (WARNING: Explicit Language Used)


    The fact is, Google's Fiber service is half the cost and hundreds of times faster, without any sort of monthly bandwidth cap. I don't think Google intends to dominate the ISP market so much as prove that it's possible to have fast, reliable connections...at a respectable price. If they can do this as one of their many side projects, then these huge megacorporations like Time Warner and Comcast should be using the billions of dollars they suck out of the working man, to upgrade their systems to the point that they're on par, or more advanced than Google's network.

    And if their technology is already the same, well then that just goes to show how much of a ripoff these things really are.
     
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  3. Sydman

    Sydman Premium Member Rescue Squad Premium Member

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    Exactly, look at the price of gas. Once they realized we would pay $3.30 or more a gallon, it was never going to drop below $3.00 again. Prices went crazy back in 2005 because of all the damage of hurricane Katrina, and they were never reasonable again.
     
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  4. swc2001

    swc2001 Active Member

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    Ok so I wrote them at two places. One where we were told about here... and an email to
    openinternet@fcc.gov
    I recommend doing both as well. Put you address and other info in the email as well.
     
  5. swc2001

    swc2001 Active Member

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    So let me ask this..... when is this going down? How is it going down?
    Should we write our congressman as well?
    Kinda confused really!!
     
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  6. veraderock

    veraderock DF Administrator Staff Member

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    I don't think it would hurt to contact your congressman. The more pressure to kill this thing the better!
     
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  7. cereal killer

    cereal killer DF Administrator Staff Member

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    +1 We'll have to wait a few more weeks until those useless tools return from vacation though. :)
     
  8. kodiak799

    kodiak799 Gold Member

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    First off, I specifically mentioned lack of competition and that's entirely different from the net neutrality argument. Because of lack of competition, they're going to make the same money in either scenario so the only question is who pays. Net neutrality in that regard is actually anti-consumer because it forces them to subsidize certain content types and other users.

    It's not double dipping. Again, you appear to be unfamiliar with how many industries operate. There's really nothing superior or advantageous about all revenues coming from the destination/end-user. The pipeline owner is going to get $50 per user one way or the other - limiting how they collect that $50 has no real advantage (except to the people currently being subsidized who, like the unlimited abusers, tend to be the ones whining the loudest because they know they're getting a good deal).

    It's funny to see people take the side of Netflix and Youtube. Those two sites account for like 2/3 of internet traffic which has spiked demand for bandwidth and forcing companies to add/upgrade capacity much earlier than planned or otherwise needed. And this entire debate really boils down to Netflix and Youtube don't want to pay a penny for the infrastructure and pushing Net Neutrality arguments to keep the free ride going.
     
  9. kodiak799

    kodiak799 Gold Member

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    It's very simple to understand, really. They can continue to charge the same "low" price for their users, and then Netflix will pass on its cost to its users. That way only the people who watch Netflix ultimately pay for the extra bandwidth required - which is superior to charging a little more to everybody.

    Stinks if you're a Netflix user, but it's fair. I don't understand why everyone is fighting so hard to subsidize Netflix and its users.
     
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