Fcc is onto data exempt content

Discussion in 'Tech News' started by xeene, Dec 18, 2015.

  1. xeene

    xeene Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2010
    Messages:
    3,108
    Likes Received:
    906
    Trophy Points:
    208
    Location:
    usa
    Ratings:
    +1,044
  2. Jonny Kansas

    Jonny Kansas Administrator
    Staff Member Rescue Squad

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2010
    Messages:
    16,526
    Likes Received:
    7,088
    Trophy Points:
    1,278
    Location:
    Michigan's Upper Peninsula
    Ratings:
    +8,435
    Current Phone Model:
    Pixel XL
    Twitter:
    jonny_ks
    Yeah. While I can see how you could argue either side, they're really kind playing a loophole in net neutrality. Sucks for consumers in the short-term if this turns into a full-fledged investigation instead of just a fact-finding thing, but in the long run, I do kind of agree that making streaming of certain apps free hinders competition and innovation. I'd be more than happy to have certain apps not count against my data cap on vzw, but who knows what other better apps we'd miss out on in the future just because they couldn't compete with that?
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  3. xeene

    xeene Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2010
    Messages:
    3,108
    Likes Received:
    906
    Trophy Points:
    208
    Location:
    usa
    Ratings:
    +1,044
    All caps need to get the way of dinosaurs. These companies are really screwing their customers. Just like phone manufacturers do. Release features one year, take them away next and then re-release them again and make a big deal about it. I can't stand it.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. kodiak799

    kodiak799 Gold Member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2010
    Messages:
    6,000
    Likes Received:
    774
    Trophy Points:
    258
    Ratings:
    +941
    The pricing model is kind of screwed up. Charging both sides of the data stream POTENTIALLY is a NN issue, but not necessarily (people just assume that is the case). If the price needs to be, say $100 then whether you pay $100 and Netflix 0, or vice versa, or split evenly that's all good and fair. The problem comes into play when the pricing model is manipulated to collect $120 instead of the $100, which is really only possible because of local monopolies.

    The pricing models need to evolve, because exploding bandwidth required for video is an entirely different animal. Personally I think it would better for the consumer to have cheaper, unlimited data and make-up the difference in higher prices to video distributors like Netflix and Youtube (Google). Let those services figure out how to pass that cost onto their consumers. But that is NOT a NN issue so long as the price & service offered to Netflix and Google is available to everyone.

    The above would be a huge win for consumers as you'd no longer be subsidizing people with massive demand, or even just occasional spikes in bandwidth needs to stream video. The problem is anchoring to these legacy pricing models that aren't really based on usage.