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FCC Encouraging U.S. Telecoms to Explore Replacing Phone Numbers with IP Addresses

Discussion in 'Android News' started by dgstorm, Jan 31, 2014.

  1. dgstorm
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    dgstorm Editor in Chief Staff Member Premium Member

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    It's possible (probable?) that in the future, U.S. telephone customers will not have telephone numbers. Instead they will have IP addresses. A new report indicates the FCC is encouraging phone companies to explore the possibility of replacing telephone numbers with IP addresses. VoIP isn't a new concept, but for the most part it has simply be an interesting side-bar option in the telecom world. Apparently though, the FCC thinks it has a much greater potential than that.

    For now, the FCC really just wants to know the ramifications for such a change. Here's a quote with a few more details,

    What do you guys think? Is this something that simply never work or is simply inevitable?

    Source: Engadget
  2. jroc
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    jroc Well-Known Member

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    For the many older folks in this world that dont have internet.... a few in my family....are they gonna offer coupons like they did for the switch over from anaolg to digital tv?

    IP addresses have different number lengths....do they all start out at the smallest length and grow?

    How would they co exists with current IP addresses? This will be one of the biggest disasters in the history of technology if it isnt thought our properly.
  3. kodiak799
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    kodiak799 Well-Known Member

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    I don't know what the problem is - I have traditional 10-digit numbers assigned for both of my VoIP services. Now what the FCC probably wouldn't want is a VoIP in Florida having a Seattle area code (and I'm not sure if you can do that now, nor is it that different than someone who moves from Seattle to Florida and keeps their cell number).
  4. jspradling7
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    jspradling7 Active Member

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    "What was your number again?"

    [​IMG]
  5. Tonik
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    Tonik Member

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    The original article via Reuters has NOTHING to do with using IP numbers instead of phone numbers. It only asks the viability of voice over IP for everything. This website is over IP yet we still come here via a people friendly name. We will still use regular numbers for phone.

    Sorry to rain on this article, but folks are missing the point.
  6. AECRADIO
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    AECRADIO Member

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    Even if the nation's phone system is converted to an IP address, there will be abusers of the framework, just as we suffer with the spy scandals, our phones may be used as spy tools if everything uses DHCP/IP and the host of netmasks and subset features currently available.
    If the conversion is pushed, I suspect the time frame would need to be decades to accomplish such a feat. Conversion isn't a simple switch flick here.
    Avery company would need to be able to 'hot swap' their service, keeping the old service active, while cutting in the new one. making it seamless can be insurmountable if you don;t have the expertise to know how to make such a swap.

    A study of the process is fine, but the FCC is also a government agency, with personal agendas to push.
    Government should never be allowed to regulate anything, simply advise and suggest, and then step out of the way and let commerce proceed as fast as the market allows/demands.
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2014
  7. kodiak799
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    kodiak799 Well-Known Member

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    Is it really any more difficult than the current cable/internet providers offering VoIP as part of their bundles? Really just a matter of the hardware (which they would sell or rent) and then setting it up like they do currently with cable/internet/landline. Some of them already offer VoIP for business accounts.

    Ooma and Google Talk both seem to offer pretty good quality VoIP, and the set-up for the latter is almost simple as can be (though the use/interface isn't all that simple or convenient).

    The issue I see with going all VoIP is people would be denied emergency services during a power outage. Not sure what happens with VoLTE during a power outage, but would be interesting to see if as VoLTE starts rolling out if the cell providers wouldn't sell VoLTE-only home service (they would give you a base station that traditional phones plug into).
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2014
  8. AECRADIO
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    AECRADIO Member

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    You can't simply switch the infrastructure, the backbone equipment must be replaced, it was designed for wireline service, not IP, the switches, routers and link-level gear was configured for wired interconnects.
    A backhaul is not an issue, even wired service has microwave connections.
  9. kodiak799
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    kodiak799 Well-Known Member

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    Again, what needs to be switched or replaced? Everyone that has an internet connection (like 98% of the nation) is already VoIP capable.
  10. AECRADIO
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    AECRADIO Member

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    It is the phone infrastructure, designed as a wireline service, the switching wasn't designed for VOIP, there are no routers for this. Our local telco had to refit their network so they can offer DSL, as the original service was unable to handle/route such data/traffic.
    I live in a rural area, and our population is quite low, as in under a million for 10 counties, maybe even more. Most businesses here are far behind the times, even 4G service is very spotty and sparse, 3G is just gaining traction. It all comes down to population and what is driving the economy. NYC would NOT survive in our area, there are no real services, and what is available, would never be able to meet the needs of the masses, they don't have the infrastructure to provide such levels of service.
  11. dgstorm
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    dgstorm Editor in Chief Staff Member Premium Member

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    I greatly appreciate the feedback and the input. I should have made it clear in the article. Even if we switch to IP addresses, it could actually make it easier for folks to have their own "personalized-by-name" identifier. This is because a VoIP system would attach your name to an IP address. If I understand it correctly, the average user wouldn't even need to know that that number is. Please correct me if I am oversimplifying it...
  12. kodiak799
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    kodiak799 Well-Known Member

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    They don't NEED the wireline service it would simply be obsolete - VoIP over broadband. I understand what you are saying about some rural areas, but 99% of the country has internet and none of this stuff you are carrying on about matters. You seem to be implying that they would have to utilize existing landlines for VoIP.

    And like I said, VoLTE is coming...and I don't think it will be that difficult or expensive to just slap down a tower near you to deliver VoIP (VoLTE).

    It has nothing to do with your old landline, doesn't need or use it....nothing to convert, switch, refit or anything. If you have an internet connection, you are VoIP capable. Period.
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2014
  13. MissionImprobable
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    MissionImprobable New Member

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    Considering that companies like Verizon, AT&T, and Comcast/XFinity have already gone this way with the at-home phone service they offer, I'd say it's pretty likely.
  14. AECRADIO
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    AECRADIO Member

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    No, they don't need the wired side of the service, but there are areas, such as mine, where wire is deeply entrenched, and VOiP is just now making gains.
    Even our copper is 'ancient' and the newest fiber are builds by Charter and Comcast and the like. Even our head-ends have little in the way for 'modern' services, as the area is not populated enough for the service to be cost effective. On my location, our pedestals have cable only, and the line amps and distribution plant is cable only, not supported by HFC.
    Our serving telco is Frontier, and they have very poor offerings, even for internet, you have DSL, and if you have T1, it's NOT at a high enough speed/bandwidth to make sense.
    People forget about location, location, location....it is about where you live, as to what services are available and offered!
    Gee, even 4G is sparse here, and only in metro areas like Wausau, and one or two sites in Oneida county or Vilas, very sparse!
    3G is always lit, but 4G...*laughing*...Not so much!
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