[Editorial] Google's Nexus Q Vs. Google TV; What really are the differences, and Why?

Discussion in 'Android News' started by dgstorm, Jun 27, 2012.

  1. dgstorm

    dgstorm Editor in Chief
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    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    One of the big news stories of today from Google I/O 2012, was Google's launch of their new "social streaming media player" the Nexus Q. This device is designed to be a media hub for all of your Google Play cloud stored digital content like movies and music. It attaches to your speakers and/or stereo system at home and allows you to stream all of your content through it, and control it with your Android phone or tablet. According to reports, it is basically a streaming media hub for the Google@Home concept (formerly announced last year as Android@Home). It can be pre-purchased for $299.99 now and will ship sometime in July.

    This brings about some obvious questions. One, what really is the difference between this Nexus Q and Google TV? Two, why would Google release a product that could fairly easily be confused with one of their other products? And, three, why release it at all? Let's dig deeper into that last question first shall we... This device is basically just a sphere shaped box with some audio and video interfaces on it. Isn't that basically what a Google TV is also? The chip that is in this new device is the OMAP 6640, which is the same chip inside the Samsung Galaxy Nexus. Couldn't they have worked ahead with their OEMs? They could have smashed this chip into the next Google TV device, installed the same software, and BAM! Now, the Google TV does all of these same things, broadening its appeal.

    Obviously, they really are two different products. One is designed to facilitate a different TV watching experience, while the other is designed to help stream personal media content from your own cloud storage. However, these two concepts are not really mutually exclusive, and in fact they really walk hand in hand together. The marriage of the Nexus Q and Google TV would be a massive step toward a true convergence of entertainment in your living room.

    Can it be that the genius Googlers never actually thought to merge these two ideas together? Perhaps you guys can come up with some reasons why Google chose to go this route and practically compete with themselves while confusing their customers at the same time, and for a whopping $300 dollar pricetag!

    For more discussions check out the latest addition of GoogleTVForums.org dedicated to the Nexus Q: Nexus Q Forum

    Source: GoogleTVForum.org
     
    #1 dgstorm, Jun 27, 2012
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2012
  2. npro1464

    npro1464 Member

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    $300! Ridiculous! What can we do with this that we can't do without a HDMI cable or Aux jack? Especially since content will inevitably be blocked (off the top of my head: HBO Go, MLB at Bat, Hulu, Netflix, TBS, etc...). Neat little device, but for like $50, maybe.

    Google needs to go all in and make a worthwhile competitor to home game consoles, and try to gain crossover from people with Android phones/tablets who buy mobile games IMO.
     
  3. gadgetrants

    gadgetrants Senior Member

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    As a Revue owner (which works fine and I really enjoy) I don't think I've seen a more miserable, unhappy, angry group of device owners. At least the Viewsonic gTab got hacked and ROMmed -- the Revue, not so much. It seems their two main beefs: (1) the early-adopter price was just plain stupid, and (2) no content, no content, no content. Oh, and (3) how come Google is not doing ANYTHING to make this device reach its potential?

    Hard to believe, but Google's opening move(s) on the Nexus Q (btw, great name guys) looks to be following closely in the footsteps of the Logitech Revue. What a pity.

    -Matt
     
  4. tjk629

    tjk629 Silver Member

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    I like it, but I don't think I'd get one. I don't entertain much, and this seems like an entertainment piece.

    That said I wouldn't mind renting one for a party or event to use.

    Sent from my DROID BIONIC using Droid Forums
     
  5. bacK_N_87

    bacK_N_87 Member

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    I stopped after I seen the price for admission. I don't even think it's worth it. I truly don't feel like Google should even waste their money and R&D on something like this. They should be trying to perfect Google Tv in my opinion.
     
  6. zomnomnombie

    zomnomnombie Active Member

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    I personally dig the Q. I think it has the potential for awesome.
     
  7. akhenax

    akhenax Silver Member

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    The only appeal to the Nexus Q is that it's made in the
    .

    But still, what's the difference between this and the Google TV

    [TABLE]
    [TR]
    [TD]Google TV[/TD]
    [TD]Nexus Q[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]box[/TD]
    [TD]sphere[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]connect to cloud[/TD]
    [TD]connect to cloud[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]download/stream video[/TD]
    [TD]download/stream video[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]download/stream music[/TD]
    [TD]download/stream music[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]no dazzling lights[/TD]
    [TD]dazzling lights[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]$99.99[/TD]
    [TD]$299.99[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD][/TD]
    [TD][/TD]
    [/TR]
    [/TABLE]
     
    #7 akhenax, Jun 28, 2012
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2012
  8. wingdo

    wingdo Active Member

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    Deleted redundant Made in USA post
     
    #8 wingdo, Jun 28, 2012
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2012
  9. zomnomnombie

    zomnomnombie Active Member

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    I agree that the price is wrong but to say that it's Google TV is a mistake. Google TV involves clunky hardware and dependent on specially designed apps that may not exist.

    For the Q all you need is your cloud stuff and your phone. This is what Google TV should have been.
     
  10. gadgetrants

    gadgetrants Senior Member

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    Can you elaborate on the phone part? Not sure how that plays a role...as a nifty remote?...as a source of media content?...

    My experience with the Revue is if we ignore the obvious hardware differences (e.g., processor architecture) it's basically your standard Android device. It has multiple DLNA clients, so I can stream from my local media servers, or grab something from the cloud. I can watch Youtube, and I can download a movie from Play or Amazon or...etc. I can use it to browse the content on my phone, play media files or display a photo album. I can play music from Pandora, run dozens of Android apps...you get the idea.

    From the perspective of the guy on the couch, this looks like 99% the same concept to me. The black box (whether round or square) has an internet connection, which allows me to stream media content to it. It runs Android, which allows me to run Android apps (unfortunately, a small number).

    The main frustration for Google TV owners is that because of the hardware, it runs only a fraction of the available apps out there. Pretty reasonable complaint. So Google's response is to essentially put some beefy phone hardware in a new container, add HDMI and ethernet ports, and give it a new name. The gain is that now a much larger number of apps will work (though owners will complain -- like they did with tablets -- that many "phone" apps don't look or act right on their TV). Meanwhile, the drawback is there needs to be a BOATLOAD of good TV content, or like the Revue and Google TV version 1.0, it will die on the vine.

    -Matt
     
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