Dual NAM Through Virtualization

Discussion in 'Android Hacks and Help' started by inmotion, Nov 29, 2009.

  1. inmotion
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    inmotion New Member

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    I know many people (myself included) carry multiple phones, and its a chore I'm tired of.

    For the first time I see the possibility of a true Dual NAM phone. Lots of issues to cover here, proceed with caution. Any and all contribution is encouraged.

    First off, I know Verizon won't allow multiple numbers to the same phone. There are too many things that can go wrong. To do this we need to know how a cell phone is "paired" with a number. Google is returning nothing relevant (I'm sure it's me not knowing the correct terms) but I remember from my old phones something about the NAM. With the OS being open source I'm sure we can basically copy \ paste the NAM code.

    Where can we paste the code though? The best solution is a Virtual Machine. I'm only lightly familiar with Linux, and even less so with Android, but I bet someone can port or build an app.

    That still leaves the issue of how to make it look like multiple devices to the carrier. I have nothing to contribute here....

    If we were to run a basic OS, enough to run 2-3 virtual machines, it's feasible we could run them independently with different NAMs. This would allow for 2-3 phonebooks, email addresses, even 2-3 Facebook apps running simultaneously. Imagine using the 3 home screens for 3 different lines. Same icons on each, just pointing to different accounts \ lines.

    Obviously, this would be a huge drain on the hardware, would cause it to run slowly, and drain the battery exponentially, but we have more to work with here than almost any other phone on the market.

    So in conclusion, the hard OS would run things like media, camera, and any non-network required factory apps. There would be multiple virtual machines each programmable with different #'s, which would look like different phones to the carrier. (this seems to be the roughest part, since some kind of serial number would have to be spoofed.) Lastly, the virtual machines would have to carry the factory networking required apps (maps etc) there's no reason to have multiple instances of these so they could be installed on a main or primary virtual machine, probably the one that carries the main or personal number.

    Lots to swallow, but is it feasible? Obviously rooting the phone comes first...
  2. sir
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    sir New Member

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    i use Google Voice which allows me to use a second number on my device....
  3. inmotion
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    inmotion New Member

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    Call forwarding only solves 10% of the problem. There are many people who carry multiple phones because they require the functionality. If my clients call a specific number, they expect that number to call them back. Call forwarding doesn't do that. Also, I have to monitor multiple Facebook accounts, email addresses, and keep different phone books separate.

    I know that there are others carrying multiple phones, and I think that if the open source community takes interest in this, it can be done.
  4. inmotion
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    inmotion New Member

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    There's even the possibility of implementing Win Mobile, Blackberry, or iPhone emulators. Imagine running 3 different OS's on your home screens. Hardware would hardly support it, but were on the verge of a changing landscape all across technology. Who here doesn't run at least one virtual OS on their PC?
  5. angel12
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    angel12 New Member

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    Ok guys here is how verizon pairs a number to a device:
    CDMA phones all have an ESN or MEID number, which is basically a serial number. When the device is turned on, the phone looks at the PRL (preferred roaming list) to see what towers it can talk to, then registers with those towers using the HARDWARE esn/ meid number. It is ILLEGAL!! to copy the esn from one phone to another, and without a CDMA phone with dual radios we cannot have one device registering two different numbers on the network. For GSM phones, there are SIM cards that have the imeid (correct me if im wrong) that registers with the network, and there are GSM phones with dual sim slots, so you can have two numbers on one device. Just programming the NAM into a device will not give it another number, and on the droid it is IMPOSSIBLE to have two phone numbers registered.
  6. inmotion
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    inmotion New Member

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    Well illegal ends this thread pretty quickly.
  7. JoeFresco
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    JoeFresco New Member

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    illegal? citation needed.
  8. angel12
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    angel12 New Member

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    Cloning an ESN is illegal, look it up. There might be a loophole for it in the DMCA, but ive never seen the loophole.
  9. Backnblack
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    Backnblack Premium Member Premium Member

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    Cell Phone Fraud
  10. chrishaff
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    chrishaff New Member

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    Spoke with Verizon

    Just got off the phone with 611. Their system says this can be done with the Droid. The rep and I then eventually got to a level 2 person from porting to get that number over. The porting rep had to look it up and came back saying that they couldn't do it.

    The front line rep at this point wasn't satisfied because (a) his system says it can be done and (b) he too doesn't want to schlep phones. He dug around in his system and found an older note that said you need to do this at retail so they phone can be physically re-flashed.

    So, I'll try that route during the week & will keep you posted.
  11. Ahn Droid
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    Ahn Droid New Member

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    Is cloning an ESN illegal?

    People keep saying it is illegal, but nobody ever cites the law and section. Please cite the U.S. law that makes cloning a MEID illegal.
  12. rstone
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    rstone New Member

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    Here is a little research I found on this...

    18 U.S.C.S. § 1029(a) amends the counterfeit access device law to criminalize the use of cellular phones that are altered, or "cloned," to allow free riding on the cellular phone system. Specifically, this section prohibits the use of an altered telecommunications instrument, or a scanning receiver, hardware or software, to obtain unauthorized access to telecommunications services for the purpose of defrauding

    Here is the rest of 1029:

    § 1029. Fraud and related activity in connection with access devices

    (a) Whoever--
    (1) knowingly and with intent to defraud produces, uses, or traffics in one or more counterfeit access devices;
    (2) knowingly and with intent to defraud traffics in or uses one or more unauthorized access devises during any one-year period, and by such conduct obtains anything of value aggregating $ 1,000 or more during that period;
    (3) knowingly and with intent to defraud possesses fifteen or more devices which are counterfeit or unauthorized access devices;
    (4) knowingly, and with intent to defraud, produces, traffics in, has control or custody of, or possesses device-making equipment;
    (5) knowingly and with intent to defraud effects transactions, with 1 or more access devices issued to another person or persons, to receive payment or any other thing of value during any 1-year period the aggregate value of which is equal to or greater than $ 1,000;
    (6) without the authorization of the issuer of the access device, knowingly and with intent to defraud solicits a person for the purpose of--
    (A) offering an access device; or
    (B) selling information regarding or an application to obtain an access device;
    (7) knowingly and with intent to defraud uses, produces, traffics in, has control or custody of, or possesses a telecommunications instrument that has been modified or altered to obtain unauthorized use of telecommunications services;
    (8) knowingly and with intent to defraud uses, produces, traffics in, has control or custody of, or possesses a scanning receiver;
    (9) knowingly uses, produces, traffics in, has control or custody of, or possesses hardware or software, knowing it has been configured to insert or modify telecommunication identifying information associated with or contained in a telecommunications instrument so that such instrument may be used to obtain telecommunications service without authorization; or
    (10) without the authorization of the credit card system member or its agent, knowingly and with intent to defraud causes or arranges for another person to present to the member or its agent, for payment, 1 or more evidences or records of transactions made by an access device;

    shall, if the offense affects interstate or foreign commerce, be punished as provided in subsection (c) of this section.

    (b) (1) Whoever attempts to commit an offense under subsection (a) of this section shall be subject to the same penalties as those prescribed for the offense attempted.
    (2) Whoever is a party to a conspiracy of two or more persons to commit an offense under subsection (a) of this section, if any of the parties engages in any conduct in furtherance of such offense, shall be fined an amount not greater than the amount provided as the maximum fine for such offense under subsection (c) of this section or imprisoned not longer than one-half the period provided as the maximum imprisonment for such offense under subsection (c) of this section, or both.

    (c) Penalties.
    (1) Generally. The punishment for an offense under subsection (a) of this section is--
    (A) in the case of an offense that does not occur after a conviction for another offense under this section--
    (i) if the offense is under paragraph (1), (2), (3), (6), (7), or (10) of subsection (a), a fine under this title or imprisonment for not more than 10 years, or both; and
    (ii) if the offense is under paragraph (4), (5), (8), or (9) of subsection (a), a fine under this title or imprisonment for not more than 15 years, or both;
    (B) in the case of an offense that occurs after a conviction for another offense under this section, a fine under this title or imprisonment for not more than 20 years, or both; and
    (C) in either case, forfeiture to the United States of any personal property used or intended to be used to commit the offense.
    (2) Forfeiture procedure. The forfeiture of property under this section, including any seizure and disposition of the property and any related administrative and judicial proceeding, shall be governed by section 413 of the Controlled Substances Act [21 USCS § 853], except for subsection (d) of that section.

    (d) The United States Secret Service shall, in addition to any other agency having such authority, have the authority to investigate offenses under this section. Such authority of the United States Secret Service shall be exercised in accordance with an agreement which shall be entered into by the Secretary of the Treasury and the Attorney General.

    (e) As used in this section--
    (1) the term "access device" means any card, plate, code, account number, electronic serial number, mobile identification number, personal identification number, or other telecommunications service, equipment, or instrument identifier, or other means of account access that can be used, alone or in conjunction with another access device, to obtain money, goods, services, or any other thing of value, or that can be used to initiate a transfer of funds (other than a transfer originated solely by paper instrument);
    (2) the term "counterfeit access device" means any access device that is counterfeit, fictitious, altered, or forged, or an identifiable component of an access device or a counterfeit access device;
    (3) the term "unauthorized access device" means any access device that is lost, stolen, expired, revoked, canceled, or obtained with intent to defraud;
    (4) the term "produce" includes design, alter, authenticate, duplicate, or assemble;
    (5) the term "traffic" means transfer, or otherwise dispose of, to another, or obtain control of with intent to transfer or dispose of;
    (6) the term "device-making equipment" means any equipment, mechanism, or impression designed or primarily used for making an access device or a counterfeit access device;
    (7) the term "credit card system member" means a financial institution or other entity that is a member of a credit card system, including an entity, whether affiliated with or identical to the credit card issuer, that is the sole member of a credit card system;
    (8) the term "scanning receiver" means a device or apparatus that can be used to intercept a wire or electronic communication in violation of chapter 119 [18 USCS §§ 2510 et seq.] or to intercept an electronic serial number, mobile identification number, or other identifier of any telecommunications service, equipment, or instrument;
    (9) the term "telecommunications service" has the meaning given such term in section 3 of title I of the Communications Act of 1934 (47 U.S.C. 153);
    (10) the term "facilities-based carrier" means an entity that owns communications transmission facilities, is responsible for the operation and maintenance of those facilities, and holds an operating license issued by the Federal Communications Commission under the authority of title III of the Communications Act of 1934 [47 USCS §§ 301 et seq.]; and
    (11) the term "telecommunication identifying information" means electronic serial number or any other number or signal that identifies a specific telecommunications instrument or account, or a specific communication transmitted from a telecommunications instrument.

    (f) This section does not prohibit any lawfully authorized investigative, protective, or intelligence activity of a law enforcement agency of the United States, a State, or a political subdivision of a State, or of an intelligence agency of the United States, or any activity authorized under chapter 224 of this title. For purposes of this subsection, the term "State" includes a State of the United States, the District of Columbia, and any commonwealth, territory, or possession of the United States.

    (g) (1) It is not a violation of subsection (a)(9) for an officer, employee, or agent of, or a person engaged in business with, a facilities-based carrier, to engage in conduct (other than trafficking) otherwise prohibited by that subsection for the purpose of protecting the property or legal rights of that carrier, unless such conduct is for the purpose of obtaining telecommunications service provided by another facilities-based carrier without the authorization of such carrier.
    (2) In a prosecution for a violation of subsection (a)(9), (other than a violation consisting of producing or trafficking) it is an affirmative defense (which the defendant must establish by a preponderance of the evidence) that the conduct charged was engaged in for research or development in connection with a lawful purpose.

    (h) Any person who, outside the jurisdiction of the United States, engages in any act that, if committed within the jurisdiction of the United States, would constitute an offense under subsection (a) or (b) of this section, shall be subject to the fines, penalties, imprisonment, and forfeiture provided in this title if--
    (1) the offense involves an access device issued, owned, managed, or controlled by a financial institution, account issuer, credit card system member, or other entity within the jurisdiction of the United States; and
    (2) the person transports, delivers, conveys, transfers to or through, or otherwise stores, secrets, or holds within the jurisdiction of the United States, any article used to assist in the commission of the offense or the proceeds of such offense or property derived therefrom

    Also see: U.S. v. DON BILLY YATES, JR.
  13. mikes
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    mikes New Member

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    So, it's not illegal, if not intended for fraud.
  14. rstone
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    rstone New Member

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    Not necessarily...under 18 U.S.C.S. § 1029(9) anyone who...

    (9) knowingly uses, produces, traffics in, has control or custody of, or possesses hardware or software, knowing it has been configured to insert or modify telecommunication identifying information associated with or contained in a telecommunications instrument so that such instrument may be used to obtain telecommunications service without authorization

    and under under 18 U.S.C.S. § 1029(e)(1)

    (1) the term "access device" means any card, plate, code, account number, electronic serial number, mobile identification number...

    In other words, if you modify devices MEID to obtain service on a second number without Verizon's authorization than this could apply to you.
  15. mikes
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    mikes New Member

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    Well, yes, that would be fraud. As I said, it is not illegal if it is not for fraudulent purposes.

    Say someone had two Droids, both under contract. They make it so one could use the MEIDs of both (ignoring whether this is technically possible), and destroyed the other one. Telecommunications service associated with both MEIDs is already authorized, so no harm, no foul.

    Moving an ESN/MEID is no different legally than moving a SIM card to a different phone on a GSM system ("the term "access device" means any card..."), as long as no fraud is involved.

    The purpose of that section is to prevent cloning phones, so that two phones can't share the same service.

    It's not clear why you included the second cite, it doesn't reference the first in any way ("access device" doesn't appear there). Also, the MIN is not relevant to this discussion, it's the "electronic serial number."
  16. rstone
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    rstone New Member

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    Some more info...

    In an Order, the FCC adopted a rule (22.919) requiring that all cellular telephones for which type acceptance is sought after January 1, 1995, must be designed such that the factory-set ESN can not be reprogrammed. At the same time, the commission stated that it considers any knowing use of cellular telephone with an altered ESN to be a violation of the Communications Act (Section 301) and alteration of the ESN in a cellular telephone to be assisting in such violation. The Wireless Telephone Protection Act (Public Law 105-172) was signed into law on April 24, 1998, expanding the prior law to criminalize the use, possession, manufacture or sale of cloning hardware or software.

    It is possible to obtain two cellular phones with the same telephone number as long as the cellular carrier in the market has the software in place to handle the billing and its fraud detection system won't be triggered by the use of two phones with the same phone number.

    Electronic Serial Numbers (ESN) and MEID
  17. mixman
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    mixman New Member

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    Hi. I've just registered here because google returned this topic when I searched, "multiple nam phone", and I got me thinking of leaving sprint.

    Like inmotion said:
    I want to carry 1 single phone that has at least 2 different incoming numbers like an old beeper. From what I read here, I think inmotion wants the same, but with 3 independent and separate lines of service on 1 single phone.

    This post:

    Is not what I want.

    Has anyone found a single phone solution? Thanks
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