Consumer Reports 'Can't Recommend' iPhone 4 Due to Signal Issues

Discussion in 'Non-Android Smart Phones' started by kenbarnum, Jul 12, 2010.

  1. STIDRIVER

    STIDRIVER Member

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    Add this and the class action lawsuit agains AT&T and Apple... Steve Jobs is having a bad week...
     
  2. aaf709

    aaf709 Nice Guy Premium Member

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  3. Rindaen

    Rindaen Member

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    Never used Consumer reports for anything.

    They cant recomend the iPhone but yet they list the iPhone 4 as the best Smartphone on the market.
    And now they are changing there stance on the iPhone's signal issue
    Consumer Reports Electronics Blog: iPhone 4's supposed signal woes aren?t unique, and may not be serious


    This issue isnt unique to the iPhone 4 , Nexus 1 has an issue when you cover the lower left (i think) portion of the phone.

    My 3G doesnt have this issue, ofcourse the plastic back helps i think

    iPhone 4 - Antenna issue
    Droid X - Open system? thats Locked down tight :huh:


    ATT Save $15 USD a Month
    Verizon Spend $20 USD more a month

    Not like we can trust Cunsumer reports is it?
     
  4. kenbarnum

    kenbarnum Member

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    The blog is 2 weeks old. It even has an old update where the author recounts this because he had the issue himself.
    Consumer Reports Electronics Blog: iPhone 4 signal debate rages; we experience signal loss in some calls

    Consumer Reports got this right.
     
  5. jroc

    jroc Silver Member

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    lol@ppl questioning Consumer Reports. Like I explained at Engadget, these folks are involved in testing car safety, baby car seats safety, stroller safety, crib safety....

    They test everything under the sun for best value, safest, most durable, etc....

    Cmon ppl. And ppl that are questioning CR dont understand the power they have. That CR rating could actually mean a dip in sales. Really.
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2010
  6. Rindaen

    Rindaen Member

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    Didnt see the date on that Post, my bad.

    Sorry I dont blindly trust anything I hear or read.
    Consumer Reports or other
     
  7. jntdroid

    jntdroid DF Super Moderator Premium Member

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    better to be a skeptic in this day and age of over-information... imho anyway

    speaking of unbiased info, here's another great article (edit: mainly point #5) from our friends over at beatweek: Top five iPhone 4 misconceptions: antenna, Verizon, glass, more : Beatweek Magazine

    :icon_rolleyes:
     
  8. Rindaen

    Rindaen Member

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    Thanks for that Link , I found this rather funny.

    "Imagine if an iPhone newbie told you that their iPhone is “defective” because when they put their finger over the bottom microphone, the people they’re talking to on the phone can’t hear them; you’d just laugh at the person and never take anything seriously that that person ever said about technology again. "
     
  9. jroc

    jroc Silver Member

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    I hope that goes for when Jobs, Apple says something too.....

    I find this absolutely amazing.....

    Wow. The folks that be involved with recalls for safety reasons...are now irrelevant.....cuz they found the antenna issue in the iPhone 4 serious enuff that they couldn't recommend it....

    Wow.....and I used to think when ppl said iPhone folks like that are "drinking the Kool Aid' was kinda overboard....lol
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2010
  10. Rindaen

    Rindaen Member

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    But ofcourse

    Im guessing Consumer Reports also had a excellent rating on Toyota as well, Bet they changed there suggestions when all the recalls came out im sure.
     
  11. jntdroid

    jntdroid DF Super Moderator Premium Member

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    I'm pretty sure he edited his original article to add that note about Consumer Reports - I commented on that article first thing this morning (mentioning CR) and don't remember seeing that in the article... of course, my comment was not posted. And I was very balanced in my comment, b/c I agree it's been blown up bigger than it probably needed to be, but I simply asked him not to ignore it and not to swing the pendulum the complete opposite direction.

    And, Toyota's are still reliable, just watch out for the gas pedal ;)
     
  12. jroc

    jroc Silver Member

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    I tried to leave a comment on dude's blog again and of course its awaits approval...

    About the Toyota recalls and CR:

    Consumer Reports suspends recommendations for Toyota's recall models

    Yea they changed it. It was only for certain models and years. The iPhone 4....well its just that one model.

    CR isnt some chump change tech blogger or analyst...they effect the buying decisions of millions of people.
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2010
  13. Mojo

    Mojo Active Member

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    It was a good read.. I got some good laughs out of this article. Lets take a closer look....


    Top five iPhone 4 misconceptions: antenna, Verizon, glass, more

    July 12, 2010


    iPhone 4 has been a runaway hit, but that hasn’t stopped a massive amount of misinformation about the device (mostly of the negative variety) from circulating, leaving some potential buyers in the dark as to what the iPhone 4 experience actually has in store for them. So in the name of helping to clear up some of the confusion, here are the top iPhone 4 misconceptions addressed in no particular order:

    1. Glass: Most people hear the word “glass” and freak out, as nearly everyone has had some bad experience with breaking glass at some point in their life. So the new iPhone’s all-glass body has some people concerned about durability. But as it turns out, the glass screen has been the most durable component of the first three iPhone generations. The original nearly all-metal iPhone was scratched and dented way too easily; the acrylic backing of the 3G and 3Gs models did better with the denting but was still easily scratchable. In fact most beat up old iPhones share the same thing in common: the glass screen is the only part of the iPhone that hasn’t gotten beaten up. Suffice it to say that the “glass” used for the iPhone’s body has little in common with the drinking glasses in your kitchen when it comes to the ability to withstand wear and tear, and even drops. No one will know the long term durability of the iPhone 4 until it’s been around for awhile, but based on what we learned during the first three years of the iPhone era, the new all-glass body looks like a major step in the right direction for durability, not the wrong direction.

    Really! Okay if I drop a phone hard enough to dent a metal, that same drop will most likly break glass. With the iPhone having the entire thing encased in glass it has a much higher risk of causing damage that will render the phone useless. If I put a dent in the phone it may have a cosmetic damage. If I crack the glass well its cracked.. I will risk cutting myself, allowing for moisture damage, etc.. That is just insane to say that a glass phone is a step in the right direction for durability.


    2. FaceTime: Here’s one that’s being misunderstood in a falsely positive direction. FaceTime, Apple’s easy-as-pie two way video calling system, works as awesomely as advertised. It’s the Jetsons, Star Trek, and the Matrix all rolled into one. But there’s a catch to FaceTime which will, at least for some users, make it feel more like a Matrix sequel than the real thing: it only works on wifi. In other words, you can’t just whip out your iPhone 4 and make a video call to another iPhone 4 user; both of you have to be in range of wifi. In most cases that means being in your own home, which would lead to the question of why you’d be making a video phone call to someone in the next room of your house. More likely you’d want to use this while one person is at home and a loved out and about, but that means that the second person will have to hunt down a wifi signal, which typically means finding a Starbucks (are you going to make a video phone call in that crowd?), being in your hotel room (which could be ideal but video transmissions are data intensive and most hotels offer terribly slow wifi), or one of the other relatively few places you’ll encounter wifi in your travels. Eventually this will change once cellular networks become faster and AT&T starts allowing FaceTime calls to be made over its cellular network, removing the wifi requirement from the picture. But in 2010, FaceTime is very much a niche that can only be used in a very small number of specific circumstances. Despite the way in which Apple is marketing it, FaceTime might currently be more practical in a corporate setting where users have office wifi more readily available.

    Agreed, it is a nice nitch to have on the iPhone. I look forward to more phones having this ability. But this is nothing inovative on apples behalf.

    3. But it comes with a contract: It’s true, buying an iPhone 4 will extend your current contract with AT&T. But rather than tacking two additional years onto the end of the contract as many users mistakenly believe, it simply means that your contract will be amended to last two years from the day you buy the iPhone 4. For instance, if you bought an iPhone 3GS nine months ago, you still have fifteen months remaining on your original two-year contract. Upgrade to an iPhone 4 and you’d go back to having twenty-four months remaining on your contract, which means that you’d merely be extending it by an extra nine months. Also, the concept of being “contract-free” is widely misunderstood. Being without a contract doesn’t save you any money (your monthly bill will still be the same), and the next time you buy any phone from any U.S. carrier, you’ll go right back to being under contract again anyway. Yes, it’s ridiculous. But it won’t change until we change the laws in this country. You want to use a cellphone in the U.S. and have it be anything other than some disposable crap-phone, you’re going to be under contract. If you don’t like it, call your congressman (and frankly, you should probably do just that). But in the mean time, the only advantage to reaching the end of your AT&T contract would be so that you could switch to another carrier. Which leads to another misconception…

    Again I agree with his points here. Contracts are a fact of life. It would be nice to one day have the option to buy a phone at retail price and receive a monthly discount on price plans since it is no longer subsidised.


    4. Verizon iPhone: Once you get past all the rumors, theories, innuendo, and misconceptions, the only thing you can say for certain about the “Verizon iPhone” is that anyone claiming to have any definitive information about the situation is full of crap. There is no way that any store-level or support-level employee of Apple, AT&T, Verizon, or any other company would ever have any first hand knowledge on the subject. Whatever you’ve been told about the prospects for a Verizon iPhone, forget about it. It could happen tomorrow. It could happen a year from now. Or five years. Or maybe never. But here’s what probably is true: the rise of the iPhone has caused major strain on AT&T’s network due to the fact that there are now tens of millions of iPhone users out there doing email, internet, and other network-based stuff in a much higher per-user volume than any other cellphone (even other smartphones). There’s every reason to expect that Verizon’s network, which isn’t any more technically advanced than AT&T’s, would suffer the same fate if the iPhone came to Verizon: millions of iPhone users would expose the Verizon network for being just as underpowered as any other U.S. cellular network. And those AT&T iPhone users who had been planning to eventually switch over a Verizon iPhone will find that the grass has become just as brown on the other side. In other words, you can’t win. Over in Europe, and in fact most other civilized parts of the world, their cellular networks don’t suck like ours do. But then again, they have laws about such things and we don’t. That goes back to calling your congressman. But in the mean time, just don’t expect a Verizon iPhone experience to be any better than the current AT&T iPhone experience. In fact, once the Verizon iPhone floodgates are open, it’s possible that it could be even worse. No way to know for sure. Just don’t get your hopes up.

    The first statement could not be truer! No low level employee has a clue.
    Now on too the rest.. this is in fact false, Verizon has spent billions on their back haul network. More than any other domestic carrier out thier. It is for that reason their data network is without a doubt the most reliable. This has been proven. With all of the data cards, smartphones and other devices that are on VZW's network they have just as much strain on their network as att. VZW's infrastructure is just better than that of ATT's so VZW does not suffer from the same problems as ATT. VZW also has more total customers using their network than that of ATT. VZW just being CDMA has more traffic over their network, as they have more people from sprint, US cellular, and other companys hitching a ride on our network than that of ATT. So saying that VZW could not handle the traffic of adding an iPhone is false.

    5. But I heard something about the iPhone 4 antenna… What you’ve heard is a bunch of flat-out bull**** concocted by geek tech journalists with too much time on their hands and an anti-Apple axe to grind. Imagine if an iPhone newbie told you that their iPhone is “defective” because when they put their finger over the bottom microphone, the people they’re talking to on the phone can’t hear them; you’d just laugh at the person and never take anything seriously that that person ever said about technology again. That’s how ridiculous this whole iPhone antenna controversy is: if you try really hard, you might be able to figure out how to hold your iPhone 4 in such a manner that you can slightly reduce the signal strength, if you just happen to be in a location in which the signal strength is at a certain level to begin with. In other words it’s a non-issue. But it’s been so overblown by those in a position to overblow it, that the most common reaction we get here at Beatweek is along the lines of “I bought an iPhone 4 and I can’t figure out how to make the antenna problem to happen, so I think there must be something wrong with my unit.” That’s right, these geek clowns posing as journalists have created such a level of phony controversy that users now think there must be something wrong with their iPhone 4 because they can’t find anything wrong with it.
    The way in which various technology journalists have twisted this issue to suit their own agenda is embarrassing, and I’ve recently had to cross a few names off the list of fellow technology journalists whose opinions I thought I respected, based on the harmful nonsense they’ve been propagating about this very issue (including Consumer Reports, who just signaled the end of its own relevance this week). Bottom line: the iPhone 4 has its pros and cons, but there is no “antenna controversy” and you’d do well to stop paying attention to any self-proclaimed expert who claims that there is. Make your iPhone 4 decision based on the facts of the matter, not based on the fact that some geek headline writer would rather see you using a geekier phone like the Droid and is perfectly willing to lie to you about the iPhone 4 in an attempt to carry out their agenda.

    Consumer Reports is a very accredited and respected company. As well as others with degrees in engeniering that have tested this device. To deny that there is a problem is only being blinded by fanboyism! There is a problem, it has been proven. This is fact not fiction.

    Is the iPhone useless.. no. Is it still a great device, probably so. The OS is solid. The design is flawed. Period.
    When you buy a smartphone, it main function (being a phone) should work with as little flaws as possible. Everything else should be secondary.
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2010
  14. Darkseider

    Darkseider Senior Member

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    Consumer Reports is spot on with this one. I know three people with the iPhone 4 and I can reproduce the issue on all of those handsets religiously. As for the Droid X open system that is locked down? What in the hell does that have to do with anything? It is still more open in stock form than iPhone OS by allowing the installation of untrusted software directly to the phone from the internet or other media. Not to mention that the OS on the Droid X is not flawed or defective. So the comparison of a known flawed design vs. something that works as designed is kind of pointless.
     
  15. aaf709

    aaf709 Nice Guy Premium Member

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    I have a 2005 Prius, bought new in April 2005. Of all the Priuses on the road, how many were affected by a sticking gas pedal? I certainly didn't have any problems and I had to deal with people asking me why I drove a deathtrap.

    And Toyota had a recall. I took mine in and they loaned me a car for free until they had installed a new gas pedal.

    Rather than have a recall, Apple should be giving out bumpers for free (but only if you go and put in a claim, to be fair).
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2010