Calibrate Battery?

Discussion in 'Smartphone Battery Discussion' started by Kobe24, Jun 12, 2012.

  1. Kobe24
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    Kobe24 New Member

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    Do this need to be done for phone to read battery stats correctly & can I do this without rooting?
  2. 94lt1
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    94lt1 DF Super Moderator Staff Member Premium Member

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    Are you running an extended battery? Or the stock battery?

    DROID RAZR MAXXIMIZED!!!! PREPARE TO BE VANQUISHED!!!
  3. Kobe24
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    Kobe24 New Member

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    Extended
  4. aaf709
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    aaf709 Nice Guy Premium Member

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    FoxKat recommends to completely charge with phone off. Then run it until it says to charge (about 15%) and charge again with the phone off.

    Sent from my DROID BIONIC using Droid Forums
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2012
  5. Camoxjeep
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    Camoxjeep New Member

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    Ive tried a few calibration apps with an extended battery 4000mh and to no success it wont calibrate. But I know now I can go around 30 hours or so on a full charge. Even after the first 6 hours it says 1% battery left:p
  6. FoxKat
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    FoxKat DF Super Moderator Staff Member Premium Member

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    Calibration apps aren't going to give the metering system what it needs to determine the battery's maximum and minimum voltages so it can properly gauge what the interim levels are. You need to "show" the meter by letting it read those levels right from the battery.

    Since every battery has a unique signature and unique maximum capacity the only way the charging system can possibly know is by witnessing the battery in action. The only way to do that is by charging to 100% with power off followed by discharging to 15% (10% with Jelly Bean). The subsequent charge to 100% confirms the full range to the meter and locks the range in its data store to recall from for future level calculations.

    Sent from my Droid RAZR MAXX using Tapatalk 2 with voice to text translation. Please pardon minor errors.
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2013
  7. josh1980
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    josh1980 New Member

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    I had a pretty accurate battery meter until I installed my new Motorola Extended Battery. I haven't been able to get a "good calibration" from the battery despite trying to calibrate the battery. I tried using the calibration tool and charged and discharged my phone and despite a month or so of use it still seems to jump around. Even tonight, if I look at my battery monitoring app the charge is slow and steady, then jumped 9% in 1 minute. Go figure. It's not that big of a deal(aside from the fact that I want it to be accurate) since the battery lasts so long that I haven't had the battery get critically low.
  8. TOMMYBOT
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    TOMMYBOT Member

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    Im having this problem with my bionic 4000 extended battery. Gone through so many cycles going to completely dead battery or just about hour before it dies but it still wont seem to calibrate

    Sent from my DROID BIONIC using Tapatalk 2
  9. 94lt1
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    94lt1 DF Super Moderator Staff Member Premium Member

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    What he^^^ said :)

    DROID RAZR MAXXIMIZED!!!! PREPARE TO BE VANQUISHED!!!
  10. josh1980
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    josh1980 New Member

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    I've done exactly what Foxkat says. I did alot of forum reading and stuff before I jumped into the realm of battery calibration. Still have an odd battery meter. I am rooted and I did use one of those "battery calibration" programs to wipe the old battery parameters. I can tell from using both of the batteries that my standard battery had a 100% charge of 4.351v and the extended is only 4.201v. So there are slight differences between batteries.

    Anyway, I may try doing a calibration again just to see if I can get better luck the second time.
  11. aaf709
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    aaf709 Nice Guy Premium Member

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    It seems that the best extended battery for the Bionic is the one made by Motorola in that the software plays nicely with it. I use the Bada$$ Battery Monitor (substitute 'ss' for '$$') as FoxKat recommends and it's accurate with the Motorola extended battery.

    When I had my OG Droid, I had a Seidio extended battery. No app would give a real reading, even Battery Left, which had a setting for the Seidio. In the end I used the Battery Left widget, but as it could give 3 lines of information, I put Voltage on top. I knew that if it was 4200mv it was charged and around 3500mv it was time to find a charger.
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2012
  12. nikecar
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    nikecar New Member

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    why not let it drain all the way instead of 15%?
  13. aaf709
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    aaf709 Nice Guy Premium Member

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    Good question, It may have to do with the software figuring out when to issue a "Charge Now" warning. I'm sure FoxKat knows.
  14. Laur3nNewm4n
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    Laur3nNewm4n New Member

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    Boyfriend's having the same problem with the Seido 4000mAh battery. He's let it discharge and then charged up with the phone off several times, and it still stays on 1% for like 20 hours before it finally dies.
  15. walkerstempe
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    walkerstempe New Member

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    The heck with calibration. Tried them all, it still doesn't show correctly. Get the battery monitor widget. When my battery reads 3200 mV, I know the end is a few minutes away. Getting around 16-18 hours out of my vzw extended battery, using savings settings. Shut off data and Wi-Fi when not in use. Love the slimmer size(2760) vs the 4000, which is now sitting in my drawer.
  16. FoxKat
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    FoxKat DF Super Moderator Staff Member Premium Member

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    You can "technically" let the battery drain to 0% (where the phone powers down itself), however if the meter isn't properly calibrated to the battery (not the other way around), then there's a possibility that when the phone eventually shuts down the battery may actually be close to a critical level that will fail to respond next time you try to charge it. There have been many "bootlooping", "white light of death", "black screen of death", "power cycling" threads where they all originated from a phone that was allowed to drain and power down on its own.

    For the record, I've left my phone drain to 0 and power down a number of times with no negative consequences, but did so just to see if it would fail as others' have. Of course, my meter is properly calibrated to the battery so I felt confident it would respond as it did. I attribute the failures to the meter inaccurately representing more power at the nearly completely discharged level than the battery actually has, so the phone doesn't shut down soon enough to prevent deep discharging. So a healthy battery meter will result in the auto-power down executing at the right voltages and leaving enough power to allow for connecting to a charger later and being able to boot into charge only mode.

    Excellent deduction, Watson... The phone indicates "Low battery" at 15% (10% for Jelly Bean), for three very good reasons.
    1. That's when the voltages start to drop faster than it does over the previous 70% or so, and that's the indication that the meter is looking for to determine when it's approaching the cutoff voltage for full automated power down.
    2. That's a good level to warn you of impending doom (like the Low Fuel light on your car's dashboard), essentially telling you that you are now running on the "reserve tank". This way you have time to save any work you're actively working on, say goodbye to the person you may be on the phone with, finish that last text or email and send it, make the emergency call to warn the wife/husband/BF/GF that the phone is about to die, and get to the nearest source of power to replenish the phone's battery.
    3. It sets the flag for "Low battery" at that level, and then with that flag and the one it sets at 100% charged, can now make fairly accurate estimations of how much power is remaining anywhere along the discharge curve. Without those two flags, it would be guessing (inaccurately), and would begin to stray from the actual numbers farther and farther as time and power/charge cycles are completed.
    This is not so much a meter that's not calibrated as it is a battery that's not falling within the ranges that were spec'd for the phone, or in other words, a battery that's simply not 100% compatible. It may power the phone, but as you and others have found out, it will probably provide terrible level indications.
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2013
  17. FoxKat
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    FoxKat DF Super Moderator Staff Member Premium Member

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    This "workaround" is a viable one, and as long as you are monitoring the voltages and don't miss the threshold you've set for yourself (a safe one is the 3,200 mV or 3.2 V you mention), then the battery will still have sufficient power to remain ready to take a charge and resume powering the phone (+3 V). If the voltages drop much below 3 V, then the phone may fall into one of the bootlooping sequences I've mentioned, and recover can be quite a task. If the voltages actually manage to dip to somewhere between 2.5 V & 2.7 V, you may be looking at a battery that has gone into "protection mode" state and will not come out unless essentially "defibrillated" into normal state again. Some batteries can be recovered from Protection Mode, but not with the charger that comes with the phone. Instead it takes a very carefully monitored and executed series of jolts of substantially higher voltage to wake it from that state, and even those jolts may not be successful depending how deep the voltage has dropped. The only option left at that point is replacement.
  18. FoxKat
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    FoxKat DF Super Moderator Staff Member Premium Member

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    By the way, since this thread deals specifically with Smartphone Battery issues, I am moving it to the newly created Smartphone Battery Discussion forum. There will still be a link on the Bionic forum that will take you to the original thread in its new home.

    Moving now.
  19. bobbyp
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    bobbyp New Member

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    I am going to post my question here and hope for a response. I am pretty good about calibrating my OEM extended battery. When I travel though I switch back and forth between it and the standard battery that came with my Bionic. Will my battery meter be agitate when I do this? Not sure if its the. 905 update or not but I was locked in 3g using gps and after having a full charge I was down to 50% in about two hours and it stressed me out because my car charger wasn't working. Was it possibly just an error reading the battery?

    Sent from my DROID BIONIC using Droid Forums
  20. FoxKat
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    FoxKat DF Super Moderator Staff Member Premium Member

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    I'm going to bet your suspicion is correct. For the meter to accurately indicate what the charge level is at any particular point in time, it uses the moving averages of the maximum charge level flag and the most recent 15% "low battery" flag, 10% with Jelly Bean. The problem becomes which battery was in when these level flags were set? Then once set for one battery, they are going to be inaccurate for the other.

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2013
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