1. You want that $100.00 in your pocket or an Amazon Fire TV don't you? Well here's the deal. With our new updated look we are in desperate need of an updated logo. The 'old' one has certainly served us well, but it's time. Find all the details here: bit.ly/1q0k6Wa
  2. DroidForums.net is currently undergoing a major software upgrade. If you are experiencing any problems logging in please: Contact Us

Bugless Improvements

Discussion in 'Bugless' started by Se7enLC, May 5, 2010.

  1. Se7enLC
    Offline

    Se7enLC New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2009
    Messages:
    1,263
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    If you are a linux user or spend a lot of time on the command-line, you may appreciate some of these improvements I've made to bugless beast. These changes can likely be applied to just about any ROM, with some minor tweaks. I'll be adding to these as I make mods.

    As always, MAKE A BACKUP before trying any of these! I am not responsible if you typo or even if I typo. A mistake here can be a pretty big deal! These instructions are not for the faint of heart, make sure you know what you're doing!

    Use busybox version of mount
    The default version of the mount command requires that you type the filesystem type and device node, even if you are just remounting. That's completely unnecessary in most versions of mount, including the one built into busybox. Not that it matters much now that sysrw/sysro are included by default. To switch to this version:
    Code:
    su
    sysrw
    rm /system/bin/mount
    ln /system/xbin/busybox /system/bin/mount -s
    sysro
    
    Use busybox version of ls
    The version of ls included with android doesn't have colors and doesn't handle some pretty basic command-line options. I type 'ls -al' a lot, and it annoys me that I can't do that on my droid. Now I can!

    Code:
    su
    sysrw
    rm /system/bin/ls
    ln /system/xbin/busybox /system/bin/ls -s
    sysro
    
    Use busybox version of chmod
    The version included in android only allows you to change to a numbered mode (644, 755, etc). I can never remember the numbers, so I like to use the shorthand of chmod a+x, chmod a-r, etc (UGOA for user, group, other, and all, a + or - to indicate if I am adding or removing a permission, and RWX for read, write, execute)

    Code:
    su
    sysrw
    rm /system/bin/chmod
    ln /system/xbin/busybox /system/bin/chmod -s
    sysro
    
    Use busybox ash as your shell
    The default shell is very simplistic and doesn't have many features. Ash, included in busybox, is compatible and has lots of nice features. It will show you your current directory in the prompt by default, and you can use the up arrow to select previous commands (nice if you make a typo - you can hit up and easily go back and correct it). NOTE: Be careful! If you screw this up, you'll no longer have root! (su needs to have a working /system/bin/sh to work)

    Code:
    su
    sysrw
    rm /system/bin/sh
    ln /system/xbin/busybox /system/bin/sh -s
    sysro
    
    Use bash as your shell
    Alternately, you can use bash as your shell, as it is included with BuglessBeast. I haven't tested this out, but I imagine it would work fine.

    Code:
    su
    sysrw
    rm /system/bin/sh
    cp /system/xbin/bash /system/bin
    sysro
    
    Use busybox to add the cp command
    This is already done by default in Bugless Beast.

    Use busybox version of ln
    This is just confusing, but here we go. I replaced my link command with the busybox version of the link command. Neat

    Code:
    sysrw
    rm /system/bin/ln
    busybox ln /system/xbin/busybox /system/bin/ln -s
    sysro
    
    Install your ringtones and notification tones in /system
    This will make completely sure that your ringtone or notification tone is accessible, even if your SD card is unmounted (ie, your phone is plugged into the computer). To do this, you first need to convert your mp3 ringtone to ogg:

    In Linux:
    Code:
    mpg123 -w Ringtone_Name.wav Ringtone_Name.mp3
    oggenc Ringtone_Name.wav
    
    Now copy the resulting Ringtone_Name.ogg to your droid (I'll assume that it's in /sdcard)
    Code:
    su
    sysrw
    cp /sdcard/Ringtone_Name.ogg /system/media/audio/ringtones
    sysro
    
    Reboot, and you should see your ringtone among the other system ringtones. You can do this for alarms and notifications as well:
    alarms are in /system/media/audio/alarms
    notifications are in /system/media/audio/notifications
    Last edited: May 5, 2010
Search tags for this page

terminal emulator mount -o rw remount /system busybox cp sys