Battery seemstobe doing better

Discussion in 'Smartphone Battery Discussion' started by RAZRmax, May 10, 2012.

  1. RAZRmax
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    RAZRmax New Member

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    I guess there's a break-in period? My crappy blackberrys had one
  2. Trash Can
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    Trash Can New Member

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    Nope, there is no break-in period. Your battery is at it's peak capacity when it's shipped from the factory. The capacity then starts to deteriorate little by little every day.

    What probably has happened is that you've adjusted your settings to meet your usage patterns. Also, you're probably not playing with it nearly as much as the first few days you had it.

    If you haven't done so already, read some of Professor FoxKat's posts. He has some excellent tips on battery care.
  3. FoxKat
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    FoxKat DF Super Moderator Staff Member Premium Member

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    Also, the phone is more active during the first few days of operation while it does things like housekeeping, cache populating, data collection, monitoring and adjusting its own operations to better conform to your usage patterns and such, not to mention the WOW factor wears off after the first few days so you'll use it more efficiently and less wastefully as time goes on. As the phone becomes more stable and all the other "things" stabilize, it will consume less power, so although it "appears" like the battery is going through a "break-in" period, it's actually the phone (and you) going through warm-up stretches.

    By the way, did you charge fully out of the box with power off first??? (TC, you wanna pick up here?)

    Good luck and enjoy your new phone ! :biggrin:
  4. Trash Can
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    Trash Can New Member

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    Copy and paste is much easier. With that said,

    Last edited by a moderator: May 29, 2012
  5. dbitt59
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    dbitt59 New Member

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    i am getting much improved battery life since the 181 update, have not had any real problems since updating:p
  6. mustangdroid
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    mustangdroid New Member

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    Yeah I am too with 181. I had terrible battery life with the leak ICS but now a charge holds for most of the day while the leak had to charge it 2-3 times a day.
  7. DJ_Swag_10
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    DJ_Swag_10 New Member

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    Actually, this isn't true. The battery does have a short break in period of about a week or so. It's the same with all Li-Ion and Lipo batteries I've used for many different purposes (Mainly my hobby) but after that, the phone is still getting itself set up. This can take anywhere between 2 weeks and a month depending on the amount of use you're putting your phone through.
  8. rpdonald
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    rpdonald New Member

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    Also you need to learn to use smart actions! I have my phone set up to kill data and gps when the screen goes dark and it has stretched my battery life considerably!

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using Droid Forums
  9. FoxKat
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    FoxKat DF Super Moderator Staff Member Premium Member

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    Not true...Lithium Ion batteries are already "primed" or "formatted" ( also called conditioning or "break in" ), from the factory and will never hold more current at the same charge level than they will the first time they are charged. It's simply a process of electrochemistry. Unlike Nickel Cadmium and to a lesser extent Nickel-Metal Hydride batteries which build up crystals (dendrites) that reduce charge capacity and which can be reversed (crystals diminished) by both repeat charge cycles and by burst shocking them with higher voltages, this is completely not the case with Lithium based batteries, whether Li or LiPo Pouch cells as they are in these RAZRs.

    Read below;

    "Priming a new Battery

    Rechargeable batteries may not deliver their full rated capacity when new and will require formatting. While this applies to most battery systems, manufacturers of lithium-ion batteries disagree. They say that Li-ion is ready at birth and does not need priming. Although this may be true, users have reported some capacity gains by cycling these batteries after long storage.
    What’s the difference between formatting and priming? Both address capacities that are not optimized and can be corrected with cycling. Formatting completes the manufacturing process and occurs naturally during early usage when the battery is being cycled. Priming, on the other hand, is a conditioning cycle that is applied as a service tool to improve battery performance during usage or after prolonged storage. Priming relates mainly to nickel-based batteries."

    Lithium-ion is a very clean system and does not need formatting when new, nor does it require the level of maintenance that nickel-based batteries do. The first charge is no different than the fifth or the 50th. Formatting makes little difference because the maximum capacity is available right from the beginning. Nor does a full discharge improve the capacity once faded. In most cases, a low capacity signals the end of life. A discharge/charge may be beneficial for calibrating a “smart” battery, but this service only addresses the digital part of the pack and does nothing to improve the electrochemical battery. Instructions to charge a new battery for eight hours are seen as “old school” from the nickel battery days."



    Ref: http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/how_to_prime_batteries
    See also: http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/charging_lithium_ion_batteries

    Dos:
    1. Do charge your battery initially when you first get it, by powering off ( press and hold power, then select "Power off" ).
    2. Do plug in the STOCK charger and STOCK cable and allow the phone to charge for approximately 3 hours (until it displays 100% when either of the volume buttons are pressed briefly and released)
    3. Do power up the phone and use normally after initial charge until it reaches 15% level, then power off and charge as above once again to calibrate the meter on the phone to the battery's actual capacity.
    4. Do charge multiple times during the day as you are near a power source (i.e. AC wall jack, USB port on computer, car power adapter, car Navigation Dock, Desktop Dock, etc.)
    5. Do charge more often in short bursts rather than long full charges if at all possible to extend the battery's life.
    6. Do charge as soon as possible after the phone reports "Low battery" at 15%.
    7. Do charge your phone immediately if the phone shuts down on its own due to a battery at 0%.
    8. Do power the phone off to charge whenever it is convenient to assure a full 100% charge if needed for long periods away from a power source.
    9. Do remove the phone from a case if at all possible while charging to allow it to charge cool.
    10. Do repeat the power-off charging process in the first 3 Do's every 2-3 months to re-calibrate the meter to the new and lower capacity of the battery.
    11. Do use Smart Actions, Task Manager and other pre-installed tools and procedures to reduce battery consumption
    Don'ts:
    1. Don't discharge your battery to 0% under any circumstance if at all possible.
    2. Don't "bump charge" your battery (a practice where once it's fully charged, the charger is removed and replaced to force more charge into the battery).
    3. Don't allow the battery to become excessively hot while charging.
    4. Don't use chargers other than those approved for use by the manufacturer.
    5. Don't be so preoccupied by the battery meter.
    Think of your battery meter much the same as you do your gas tank. You don't want to force more fuel into it than it was designed to accept (topping off your tank can be very dangerous). You don't want to let it run to 0% (zero, empty), or else you'll be stranded. You may want to add $20 or $40 to the tank infrequently or during a long period of use, just to assure you'll make it to the next station. You may want to add fuel even if you don't think you need it or will need it to get to your final destination, since you can't be sure if the station near your destination will be open when you get there.

    These and more tips on battery use, care, preservation and more can be found in our new Smartphone Battery Discussion forum. Please feel free to post any questions regarding battery care there, and you'll be provided with a wealth of information.

    :biggrin:

    In the interests of everyone on the forum, I am also moving this thread to the Smartphone Battery Discussion forum, but will retain a linkback to the Droid RAZR forum as well.
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2012
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