Battery Break In Period

Discussion in 'Samsung Galaxy S3' started by jared845, Oct 10, 2012.

  1. jared845
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    jared845 Member

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    In order for me to achieve the best possibly battery life on my new sg 3 is their anything specific i need to do prior to train the battery to last long?? let it die completley and then charge full or anything like that?
     
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    mountainbikermark DF Super Moderator Staff Member Premium Member

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  3. jared845
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    jared845 Member

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    k1ngr4t Senior Member

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    Ha, yeah that pretty much didn't answer anything you asked.

    Most people recommend charge it to full, then run it down to about 10%. Do this 3-4 times. Some say discharge completely, others say 10ish%, I haven't noticed a difference either way.
     
  5. FoxKat
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    FoxKat Resident Novelist...LOL! Staff Member Premium Member

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    The only reason any recommendation has been made regarding draining a Lithium Ion battery is to reset the capacity level flags on the phone so it more accurately represents the battery levels at any given time. It is as said above completely protected during charging by a highly engineered charging system that shuts down charging to prevent overcharging. Draining the battery to 0% is never recommended by those who are giving proper advice. The phone shuts down at 0% to protect the battery from deep-discharge and potential permanent damage to the battery. This is a fail-safe mechanism as well, similar to the overcharge protection.

    Getting the most from your battery depends on what you need it to do. If you are looking for the longest runtime with each charge so you can be away from any power source for extended periods, then charging with power off to 100% will maximize that charge, but it will add stress to the battery if done frequently and will shorten its lifespan. If you're looking to extend the life of the battery and are much less concerned about long breaks away from a power source, then charging more frequently and in partial charge cycles through the middle range of capacity rather than full charges is better. Charging from 30% to 70% and using in that range, rather than 5% to 100% and using in that range is less stressful on the battery chemistry.

    The reasons are that Lithium Ion batteries prefer not to be kept at high voltage levels (at or near full charge), for long periods of time, but instead prefer to be held at near 50% instead. Also Lithium Ion batteries do not like to be deeply discharged either, such as 0% to 5%, and would much rather be charged once levels of 10% to 15% are reached. Both practices will add months or more to the overall lifespan of the battery.

    Nothing you can do safely to the battery regarding charging practices will "train" the battery to last longer or provide more runtime. It will only hold as much charge as it can based on what it was designed to hold and its stage of life, such as how old it is, how many times it's been charged and how aggressively it has been charged/discharged during it's time while in service. It will never hold more than it could immediately after manufacture and will lose capacity slowly over time, even if not used or charged. It will have lost the ability to hold a full rated capacity charge very shortly after being put into service, and in about 2 years will have lost enough capacity to be deemed as "end of life", which is about 20% of rated initial capacity lost, or the ability to hold only 80% of the initial rated capacity. Even a brand new battery if left on a shelf will be considered "end of life" after about 2-3 years due to its reduced capacity to hold a charge.

    There's lots more valuable info pertaining to what's described above and otherwise on that same site that was linked to.

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2012
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