Apple Off the Hook? FBI Gains Access to San Bernardino iPhone and Drops Demands

Discussion in 'Android News' started by dgstorm, Mar 29, 2016.

  1. dgstorm

    dgstorm Editor in Chief
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    The Department of Justice reported late yesterday that they had gained access to the San Bernardino shooter's iPhone. Because of this, they are dropping their court case which sought to force Apple to open the phone for them.

    The court filing to drop the FBI demands against Apple did not specify how they gained access to the device, nor what they found on it (if anything). Interestingly, the Feds have actually refused to identify which third party hacked the iPhone for them, even though it was widely reported that the security company Cellebrite had been hired by them.

    Officials also declined to share whether this method used to unlock the iPhone 5c can be used to unlock other iPhones. This point was central to Apple's stance against the FBI's court case. Apple argued that they would be forced to create a "master skeleton key" in order to unlock this device which would leave all of their iPhones vulnerable.

    A large number of Silicon Valley tech conglomerates (including Google, Facebook, Tesla and others) filed an official motion in support of Apple's stance against the FBI's court order. The other big reason all of these Tech Titans arrayed against the court order was because they felt the order was an unconstitutional overreach designed to give the FBI extra, un-legislated power against its citizens.

    Apple responded late Monday, saying the case should have never been pursued against them to begin with. Apple's contention was that it would have set a dangerous precedent. Apple also reiterated their intent to assist with future law enforcement investigations, even as they will continue to enhance the security of their devices. Here's one of Apple's statements,

    “Apple believes deeply that people in the United States and around the world deserve data protection, security and privacy. Sacrificing one for the other only puts people and countries at greater risk."

    Here's a quote from the WSJ with a few more final points,


    So, is it easily forgotten and time to move on? This is likely an issue which will come up again, so we will leave it up for you folks to discuss what the future holds.
     
  2. dgstorm

    dgstorm Editor in Chief
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    Here's Apple's full response, for those who are interested,

    "From the beginning, we objected to the FBI’s demand that Apple build a backdoor into the iPhone because we believed it was wrong and would set a dangerous precedent. As a result of the government’s dismissal, neither of these occurred. This case should never have been brought.

    We will continue to help law enforcement with their investigations, as we have done all along, and we will continue to increase the security of our products as the threats and attacks on our data become more frequent and more sophisticated.

    Apple believes deeply that people in the United States and around the world deserve data protection, security and privacy. Sacrificing one for the other only puts people and countries at greater risk.

    This case raised issues, which deserve a national conversation about our civil liberties, and our collective security and privacy. Apple remains committed to participating in that discussion."
     
  3. WildcatRudy

    WildcatRudy Active Member

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    I am split on this. I do want my privacy protected, but would I be willing to partly give that up to protect national (or worldwide) security? And if I think about it, what, really, is so private or important on my phone in the grand scheme of things? I have nothing much to hide anyway. Still, it is "personal space." And we feel violated when that is intruded upon.

    My opinion (which isn't worth a plug nickel): apple didn't want anyone nosing around ios to find out how easy it was to break into, and how weak their protection really is. This third party seemed to do it with no problem whatsoever, demonstrating my point. If they can do it, any hacker can probably figure it out easily also. Another example of apple not living up to what its marketing makes it out to be.

    For our Android phones, even if our phones were stolen and we issued a remote wipe, I am certain there are enough fragments left behind to reconstruct the data. Encrypted or not, secured or not, no device is ever 100% safe. And because we own the device and the information on it, I don't see the logic in offering anyone a back door into it. Anyone who wants to get into it, will...whether by legal means, or not.
     
  4. chevycam94

    chevycam94 SteelDroid ROM / Cortex ROM Developer
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    I bet Apple is paranoid now, knowing their security is crap (confirmed now). Maybe they should actually try to innovate things that actually MATTER. Live Photos? LMFAO, you mean VIDEOS? Yeah, been around for a LONG time, thats not new.

    As far as privacy, there is no reason that you NEED to have ALL your stuff permanently locked away from every one else, including law enforcement. If you COULD lock it all away, that would ENCOURAGE crime, as criminals would essentially be "untouchable" in the digital world. That defeats the purpose of being safe and secure. So when it comes to your privacy, you only NEED so much. Dont be greedy and think that you need to hide your lifes story from the world. The government DOES need access to peoples personal data if it involves a criminal investigation, national security, murder, etc. Sure, there needs to be a balance, but when the time comes, you should be required to give up those liberties, ESPECIALLY if YOUR the one under investigation!
     
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  5. xeene

    xeene Gold Member

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    Don't worry, your iPhones are still safe and secure. As long as you aren't planning a terrorist attack. The company that cracked an iPhone is not just some 3rd party, they are the debeers of phone hacking.

    "Cellebrite Wireless Carriers & Retailers products are used by 150 of the world's largest mobile operators, including AT&T, Verizon, Sprint Nextel, T-Mobile, Orange, Telstra, and others"
     
  6. PereDroid

    PereDroid DF News Team Reporter

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    I totes agree. I have nothing to hide. I don't care if you can hack my phone for security reasons. If it stops one US Airport being blown to bits, I'm all for it.
    What are we so worried about with privacy?
    Most Millennials don't give a rats a-- about it, that's for sure. The "look at me" generation.
    Much more important things to worry about, this thing called living. I don't care if Google knows I have a fetish for being a furry, or that I bought a 6 pack of Sam Adams last night. In the grand scheme...meh.
     
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  7. liftedplane

    liftedplane Gold Member

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    all this means is that apple and other OEMs will add more effective encryption and stuff.
     
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  8. xeene

    xeene Gold Member

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  9. akhenax

    akhenax Silver Member

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  10. mountainbikermark

    mountainbikermark Super Moderator
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    This was just a pulse reading of how the indoctrination of the masses is going. The whole security vs freedom debate has been spun toward security over freedom by the government since before the patriot act.
    Someone brought up the younger generation doesn't care about privacy and proves it with their social media habits and things in error. Let the wrong person comment of a Tweet or Facebook post and Katy bar the door breaks loose. Then privacy matters to them. They're just naive and and ignorant about real what privacy is but want it as well as popularity.

    Support Our Troops!!!
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  11. Valvoline

    Valvoline Active Member

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    Now apple demands the FBI discloses how they got into their phone??? Claiming it's a matter of national security?? FOHWTS!!
     
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  12. bkdodger

    bkdodger Super Moderator
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    FBI had this already in the works and knew they could get the data don't let them fool you ...the whole asking Apple to backdoor it was for setting a precedent ..and not just Apple it's Google as well ...




    6s Plus
     
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