Android Skins: Beautiful, or only skin deep?

Discussion in 'Android News' started by This Green Machine, Sep 11, 2010.

  1. This Green Machine

    This Green Machine DF News Team Premium Member

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    [​IMG]

    (This is a guest post by Dave D. from ThisGreenMachine.com. The original article can be found at this link.)

    As T-Mobile announced it’s new top tier Android smart phone (T-Mobile G2) on Thursday, I saw something I had not seen in a very long time. If you don’t own an unmodded Droid or Nexus One you might not recognize the skin being used on the G2. It’s a bit modest in looks, and might lack a few features of it’s relatives, but it’s blazing fast and receives updates more quickly than others. You might have heard of it before – it’s called stock Android 2.2 (Froyo).

    After the success/failure (depending on how you look at it) of the Nexus One, I didn’t know if another stock Android device would be released until Android 3.0 (Gingerbread). Like a breath of fresh air, the T-Mobile G2’s most outstanding characteristic is it’s clean taste. In a world filled with too many toppings and fillers, vanilla is my flavor of choice: comforting, familiar, and without unneeded calories.

    Don’t get me wrong, I love that there are skins available to give the user a variety of options – not everyone prefers the stock experience. Personally, I have always been a man to choose function over form, and while most skins do improve certain aspects of the UI (e.g., media player, contacts), they also add bloat, not to mention significant lags in OS updates due to a need to tweak each skin. Take for instance the Droid 2. As previously reviewed, with a much faster processor than the Droid 1, we should have seen an increase in performance, but instead we found it to be sluggish and only slightly better. With only so many ways to design a slate device, manufacturers are veering away from their core competency (hardware), looking to differentiate on the soft side. A note to manufacturers: Let the coders code, and you stick to making great hardware.

    True to form, the Android community has responded to problems with the skin experience with the development of custom launchers. Are you using the latest Cyanogen Mod rom? Then you are probably using either Launcher Pro and ADW Launcher, which have gained notoriety due to their ability to be highly customized without all the bloat. But, this too has its flaws. As managing editor of Engadget, Nilay Patel, stated last week during Engadget’s weekly podcast: Do we really have to rely on a launcher created by some guy in his basement to give us the better Android experience than carriers and manufacturers?

    So who’s to blame? Many point the finger at Google for not better controlling the ecosystem. Comparisons of the market place to the wild west often ring true. In a strange twist of fate, Android’s best feature is also becoming its worst enemy: openness. By allowing carriers and manufacturers complete creative control, Android is quickly morphing into a road fragmented into many different paths.

    Here’s my solution. With the release of Android 3.0 (Gingerbread), any phones that include Google apps such as Gmail and the Market must ship with stock Android and stricter minimum hardware requirements. Google must work with manufacturers to develop existing skins into applications that can be downloaded and updated from the market. Smart phones can ship preloaded with a skin, but the user should be able to uninstall it if desired. Manufacturers will be allowed to limit access to skins to their devices.

    Sounds almost too simple, doesn’t it? By effectively turning a skin like Sense UI into a large custom themed launcher, the user has the option of running stock on any device if they choose, and manufacturers get a differentiating edge. System updates will only be delayed from carrier tests, and skins can be updated later via the market. Yes, I realize that a minimum hardware requirement may initially contribute to fragmentation, but at some point, a hardware refresh is necessary in order to keep up with software advances. If the bar is set high enough, hardware will last for years instead of months.

    While there is no single, easy solution for such a large problem, many are hoping that Android 3.0 (Gingerbread) will be a big step in the right direction. Skins do bring variety to the Android experience, but also create a lot of baggage. Even with all of its quirks and issues, we have to give credit to Google for sticking to its guns. Under mounting pressure and backlash, Android remains as open as promised. Let’s hope that carriers and manufacturers don’t close the door.
     
  2. mattg1

    mattg1 Member

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    I 100% agree I have been saying this since I first got my droid, let people choose if they want these skins. That's why I haven't upgraded because I cant get anything that compares to my OG droid with the vanilla experience (well that and my droid is still awesome).
     
  3. furbearingmammal

    furbearingmammal DF Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Gingerbread is supposed to be a game changer. Let's see if it turns into FroYo.

    I pray not.
     
  4. Dave12308

    Dave12308 Silver Member

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    To answer Patel, YES, we SHOULD have to rely on a launcher "created by some guy in his basement" - that is the WHOLE spirit of Android, to begin with. Open development. The apps included in the Android OS are designed to provide base functionality, and not much more. If you want something better, you do it yourself; or use something that someone else has created.

    I think people are getting too caught up with the iOS type user experience, where basically, WYSIWYG. Stock Android may not offer the best OOB experience, but the customizability is where its true beauty lies.
     
  5. JonDenver'sCopilot

    JonDenver'sCopilot Member

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    +1 Couldn't have said it better myself.
     
  6. tktouch12

    tktouch12 Active Member

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    i'd like to say i hate all the skins besides sense. i've used them all and i think sense really 'got it right' i like it better than stock or anything else.

    however, if you are on stock, launcher pro is a must. it is the best home replacement, is very customizable, and has great widgets that copy sense.
     
  7. Martin030908

    Martin030908 DF Super Moderator

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    Gingerbread is gearing more toward Google apps being updated more thru the Market vs. using massive firmware updates. It's an attempt to consolidate the 'fragmentation'.

    Google will try to create a 'blanket' look but manufacturers (ie HTC, Samsung) will always add in their own UI's. I don't see individual UI's going anywhere. It's marketing for each manufacturer.
     
  8. Chris-pee

    Chris-pee Member

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    You need to have an option. Boot with/without the skin. Simple as that!
     
  9. Martin030908

    Martin030908 DF Super Moderator

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    So simple it's brilliant, but we'll probably never get it :(
     
  10. jamezelle

    jamezelle Premium Member Premium Member Developer

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    I totally agree with you!!
     
  11. jroc

    jroc Silver Member

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    What? HTC didnt put Sense UI on it? Hmmm.....okay. Good move HTC, good move.
     
  12. jroc

    jroc Silver Member

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    Now I just read the G1 was vanilla Android too...WHY didnt Motorola do this with the Droid 2?!?! I'll give them a pass for the X, but the Droid 2 shoulda stayed vanilla too...
     
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