Android Passing iOS In Apps!

Discussion in 'Android News' started by WenWM, May 5, 2011.

  1. WenWM

    WenWM Premium Member
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    The growth of Android is certainly not something to be taken lightly, with new phones being pushed out ever few weeks, iOSs' lead in app stock is expected to be shattered in time for you to send your kids back to school. The latest report comes from Distimo, who said, while iOS is still growing, the market is seeing a huge slow down in new application development, while Android is accelerating. Now we all know it’s not the amount of apps you have, it’s the quality of the apps. Android has some pretty great applications, just about one for everything, so it’s nice to know that even when we hold our phones wrong… We still do something right when it comes to apps.

    Via: Android To Surpass Apple’s App Store In Size By August 2011: Report (Exclusive)
     
  2. Chizzele

    Chizzele Team Sourcery
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    All of us at DF knew it was just a matter of time..
     
  3. droid doctor

    droid doctor Member

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    I love android os because any app can be on the market, but with ios you actually have to be a trusted developer and your app has to be tested to get on the app store.
     
  4. Big Ry

    Big Ry Active Member

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    So this is just a projection? Hopefully it pans out. I heard dev support was lacking because of fragmentation. I never know what to believe on these forums lol. If were truly near 300k, that's awesome!

    Sent from my DROID2 using Tapatalk
     
  5. kodiak799

    kodiak799 Gold Member

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    Your little mom & pop developers are hurt by fragmentation (not that some of the best apps don't come from a college kid fooling around). Otherwise I think it's beating a dead horse - if you have a good app the market is there to make good money.

    Also, in theory, Gingerbread/Honeycomb are making it a lot easier to develop, with the ability to do an app pretty much entirely in C++. Porting is also simple an easier. In some regards, that seems like a plus for Android as pretty much every programmer learns C++ but not everyone learns OSX (although maybe that's a core college class now, don't know).
     
  6. Beardface

    Beardface Active Member

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    We may pass iOS in apps in the Market, but the quality and ongoing development will always be in the iOS market. I flat out had to delete HomeRun Battle from my phone after loving it for close to a year because they came out with an update for the iOS that gives them a far superior and robust set of boosts to choose from and we're stuck with the original. We get crushed every time and it ruins the fun.

    And lets not even mention the quality of games and apps between iOS and Android. Yes, we have some nice, clean looking apps out there, but for the most part they all look like simple hackjobs that appear to have been made for MS Dos back in the day. A vast majority of the iOS apps out there are extremely clean and look like they could be run off an upgraded version of the SNES or better. There is no comparison. And when a dev tries to port a successful app from iOS to Android, for the most part (Angry Birds being the lone exception, in my opinion) they are completely rushed and buggy as hell. Words With Friends is one of the worst Apps I've ever downloaded on the Android Market, but its insanely popular on iOS. Just frustrating.
     
  7. johnomaz

    johnomaz Silver Member

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    I have to agree. I am close to buying an iPod Touch so I can get the games from the iOS market. Yes, there are some fantastic games on Android, but they all started on iOS and many stayed there. Only a few came our way and the games aren't even the same. Updates tend to be later on Android than on iOS. I think one of the biggest downsides too is that there are so many Android devices. An app may work fine on most, but there are a few it doesn't work on. It has to be frustrating.

    I think the increase could be from the Amazon App Store. With so much more visibility, I can see it generating a lot of revenue for devs and more poeple going to it.
     
  8. CD95YJ

    CD95YJ Member

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    I would have to agree, ios is still ahead in terms of quality. I just downloaded order & chaos on my itouch, graphically its far superior to android. Heck its not even available for android. And lets not mention Netflix...

    Sent from my DROIDX using DroidForums
     
  9. czerdrill

    czerdrill Silver Member

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    Agreed. I'll never understand the point of comparing numbers to numbers with the apps. Of course android will have more apps then ios eventually because anyone and their mother can put an app on the android market.

    Quality and revenue potential lies with ios and that's not changing anytime soon.

    the only people who think fragmentation isn't an issue, are of course, non-programmers...lol.
     
  10. kodiak799

    kodiak799 Gold Member

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    It's a boogeyman argument...How many versions of Windows are people running out there? How many different PC's and hardware configurations are there? Do we ever hear about fragmentation on the PC? No, because the market is so large it's a non-issue. Does it make life more difficult for developers? Yep. Can they still make money and will they develop for Android? Yep.

    PC Linux, on the other hand....much smaller installed base and many different flavors. Fragmentation essentially did keep it from getting a foothold.

    You simply cannot ignore installed base when talking about fragmentation. I could make an argument that Android is less fragmented now, comparatively speaking, with an installed base of 100M than it was two years ago with 1M users.
     
  11. czerdrill

    czerdrill Silver Member

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    I don't know, i think its incredibly insulting to call it a "boogeyman argument". Again, to non-programmers its easy to dismiss it as boogeyman and irrelevant because all you have to do is press install or update but to those who develop apps its quite a different story.

    i'm not suggesting that fragmentation is going to destroy android and prevent any chance of a dev being successful or that devs are going to all form a union and migrate to ios, but believe me it's not a boogeyman argument.

    how many apps have you developed, are in the process of developing or have published in the android market? i'm just trying to figure out where you're getting the conviction that it's a boogeyman argument from?

    no one is ignoring installed base. however from a developer perspective, i fail to see how having more hardware configurations and more OS versions out there somehow solves the problem of fragmentation or is even relevant. installed base is high not because some standard has been reached, but because more OEMs are creating more phones and devices which all run different OS versions/hardware configs and these devices are being offered for relatively cheap prices with different hardware configurations. The popularity of android doesn't somehow negate fragmentation.

    I've developed for android and have worked with a team of devs for ios and believe me ios is far easier to develop for and support then android. and that's purely because of fragmentation, both hardware and software. taking installed base into consideration doesnt somehow make developing for android easier, and not sure why you think it would.

    Developers have to develop and bug-fix across multiple OS versions, decide how they want to distribute their app across multiple markets, and tweak their app to work across multiple hardware configurations. not to mention differences between tablets and smartphones, and programming languages.

    theres not going to be anytime soon where an android dev can make one version of his app and have it work across all or even the majority of devices. installed base has nothing to do with that. couple that with the time spent bug-fixing and providing support and your ROI is virtually nil.

    Saying "only mom and pop developers are hurt by fragmentation" is pretty much saying the overwhelming majority of devs are hurt isn't it? I mean it's not like major corporations are clamoring to make a profit on the android market(s) right? sure there are huge well known devs/companies that have made money on the android market, but that's because they have the money to make money.

    the truth is "mom and pop developers" are probably 90+% of the developers for android. it's not like every dev is part of some company that has commissioned them to create an android app. in fact, some (if not all) of the best android apps come from independent developers.

    Like I said, the people who say it's no big deal are the ones who are not creating the apps. While it may not be a deal breaker, you will be hard pressed to find any developer who says it's a "boogeyman" argument, and like i said I'm sure they would take offense to it being downplayed like that given the work that they do. It's a boogeyman for the person who just hits the update button, i'm sure, though.
     
  12. kodiak799

    kodiak799 Gold Member

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    Because the "harm" it's doing is completely overblown, hence "boogeyman scare tactic". I acknowledge it makes life more difficult for developers, but if you can make $1000 and 20% margin on IOS vs. $2000 on 10% margin on Android it doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that it is a non-material issue. Fragmentation is not going to stop you from developing as long as you can make good money on Android, and that's my point.

    Fair enough, the break-even is higher and that may prevent small/start-up developers with very limited resources from going to Android, especially if they are unsure of their market potential. But after proof of concept on IOS, fragmentation will not stop them from increasing their profits by replicating on Android.

    It's just comical to me to watch these subtle jabs at Android evolve as time proves them misguided at best, if not completely off-target to begin with. The "little boy that cried fragmentation" has been pounding the table for the better part of a year, and yet the Android app store and installed base continues to grow by leaps and bounds.
     
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