3 Strikes and Smith is Gone

Discussion in 'Off Topic Forum' started by mountainbikermark, Aug 7, 2015.

  1. mountainbikermark

    mountainbikermark Super Moderator
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  2. dezymond

    dezymond Tech Support Mod
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    Deserved it. And I honestly think he should be suspended for the year.

    Take Josh Gordon for example, he was suspended indefinitely for marijuana. Last I checked, a DUI is a lot more dangerous than smoking a joint (not speaking from experience). Considering this is the 5th arrest for Smith, Gooden needs to come down with the punishment and it'd better be a lengthy one at that.
     
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  3. FoxKat

    FoxKat Premium Member
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    If you're going to be a highly paid sports figure, a symbol of success to the younger crowd, you need to be held to a higher standard. Do the crime, do the time. No free rides because the sport needs you.
     
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  4. mountainbikermark

    mountainbikermark Super Moderator
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    Smith's second dui was for marijuana.
    What bothers me is the violence. It's like he just goes all whatever when he gets off the chain. If it was just a dui I doubt they'd have let him go.

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  5. dezymond

    dezymond Tech Support Mod
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    I didn't realize he was caught for smoking, though not surprised at all really.

    Anyways, the NFL and especially the Niners had him on a very very loose leash. His off field antics finally did him in and hopefully now he can find some help because it's obvious he needs it.

    Unfortunately, it seems to be a burden to most. I don't think any of these athletes pursued their career to really be a role model (unless they were the underdog). If you excel in your sport you're suddenly pushed under the microscope and every single thing you do is analyzed, whether it's on or off the field. Money and fame changes people, but when the cameras aren't rolling (or supposedly aren't), I think every athlete has a different side to them aside from a few. Aldon Smith obviously loves to party, drink, and whatever thing that society really frowns up. JJ Watt on the other hand seems to do everything of what we think of athletes; the guy works our around the clock almost, charity work, etc. Two greatly gifted and hard working players who gives it all on the field on opposite ends of the spectrum.

    And although they are held to a higher standard, I don't think that's really right either, they are human after all, no more or no less than you and I. Alot of professional athletes get away with a slap on the wrist compared to what us "normal" citizens get as punishment for common crimes due to their status. And unfortunately, that mentality gets to their heads and they feel they can get away with anything, which is exactly why Smith is no longer with the Niners.

    Smith is an extremely talented player. He just doesn't have the right mentality and whatever crowd he's running with outside of the field is obviously not looking out for him.
     
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  6. FoxKat

    FoxKat Premium Member
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    Well, the argument about being held to a higher standard IMHO is really about the fact that in those roles the young look up to them. They know it going in and should understand and embrace it. The problem is just as you say, they often get a slap on the wrist whereas a common citizen would be treated much differently. They have FAR MORE MONEY to hire top defense attorneys and concoct all manner of alibi or reason away why they did what they did. So just by the very nature of their financial status they are going to be less likely to be prosecuted the same as a common citizen.

    And if sports is about following the rules of the game, then it should also be about following the rules of society, since it's society that is supporting the game. It's the common citizen that's buying the lions share of tickets to attend these events, buying all the promotional material, watching the pay per view, etc.
     
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  7. dezymond

    dezymond Tech Support Mod
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    Unfortunately it's a responsibility that many of these athletes don't want. In today's day and age, there is no doubt that they know they go into their profession with that expectation, especially with social media followings everywhere. You see some players embracing that part of their profession, and some players who completely blow it off such as Smith.

    And completely agree, no matter who you are, you need to follow society's rules.
    I actually got first hand experience with some Niners; Willis, Smith, Goldson, and one other player I can't remember. I was playing basketball at 24hr Fitness and they came in. There were a couple of squads waiting to get their games in, but when the Niner crew walked in, they suddenly took up a court. Everyone was kind of starstruck and the Niner crew ended up getting a game in before another squad which was waiting a good 20min already and they were next up. And just like that, fame can bend the rules.
     
  8. mountainbikermark

    mountainbikermark Super Moderator
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    Understanding something conceptually is different than understanding it practically. Mike Vick comes to mind. He knew he was a role model but failed to live up to the pedestal because he didn't know how. It was only Reid taking him under his personal wing after Michael saw the light that gave him what he needed AND wanted. These are just kids that are thrust into another world, thus why the nfl has mandatory rookie school for how to act like a role model and how to better grasp the world of rags to riches, both limelight wise and financially, overnight. Smith is crying out for help in the only way he knows how. Johnny Football also failed at his new found fame but chose a different way to cry out for help. Add in Johnny was caudelled (sp?) all through college and it took him getting his ass handed to him on the field to realize he was messing up his life.
    Derrick Thomas and Jerome Brown did their crying out from behind the wheel and died before finding help.
    I just hope Josh Brown and Aldon Smith find the help they need before ending up dead or maimed.

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  9. FoxKat

    FoxKat Premium Member
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    I agree with all you've said. Perhaps the rookie school needs to take a cold hard look at their success or failure in doing exactly what you've mentioned. Still, you're going to have some who are thrust into the riches from rags, and you're not going to change the person inside the athlete. There will always be implosions and so my point is that they shouldn't be treated differently simply because they're there. In other words, it's not their fault that they are suddenly in the position of all the wealth and fame, other than for the fact that they are a top athlete. However it IS their fault if they let it go to their heads and lose control, act like idiots and do stupid things, rape, fight dogs, whatever. They should be held to at least the same minimum legal positions that you and I would. And their huge financial means to legal counsel shouldn't be an advantage over someone who can't afford such counsel. Wealth shouldn't dictate how severe the law comes down on you for your crimes.
     
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  10. mountainbikermark

    mountainbikermark Super Moderator
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    They are also a product of the nflpa and nfl agreements. The penalty for non violent offenses actually got weaker in the last update of its rules of conduct.

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  11. UltraDroid

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    My only thought on the Roll Model thing is thst I totally agree with that commercial Charles Barkley made back in the 1990s - the one where he explained that he wasn't paid to be a roll model and people looking for their roll models should look to their parents, a teacher, anyone in the world except athletes. He was right too. I saw the Oakland Raiders win Super Bowls in the 70s and 80s with guys who weren't perhaps nice guys but were great football players. I saw the Cleveland Indians have dismal seasons in the 70s but extoll the virtues of players who were .220 banjo hitters...but very active supporters of civic projects (nice guys). On balance, I'd have preferred winning athletes who maybe were not your idea of roll models.

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  12. dezymond

    dezymond Tech Support Mod
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    And he still preaches the same thing. Every season you can at least hear one rant from Chuck regarding professional athletes as being lousy role models. Chuck is one of the most honest people on earth in my opinion. Even though he's the butt of all jokes and is as goofy as a guy can get sometimes, he gives you his 100% honest opinion on everything and majority of the time he's right.

    I'm willing to bet you'll hear him sound off on this Aldon Smith issue, especially once the NFL dishes out the punishment. I recall him saying that it all boils down to these "kids" getting paid to play a game or promote some footwear. They're not getting paid to set a good example or to be role models, they're being paid because of their extraordinary skill at a game.
     
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